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Cover Frick, Helen Clay (September 3, 1888–November 9, 1984)

Frick, Helen Clay (September 3, 1888–November 9, 1984)  

Corp author Bain News Service

In 

Portrait of Helen Frick, between ca. 1915 and ca. 1920 by Bain News Service

Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 [LC-B2- 5094-8]

Article

Frick, Helen Clay (3 Sept. 1888–9 Nov. 1984), philanthropist and art historian  

Melanie Linn Gutowski

Frick, Helen Clay (3 Sept. 1888–9 Nov. 1984), philanthropist and art historian, was born Helen Childs Frick in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the third child of Henry Clay Frick and Adelaide Howard Childs Frick. Her upbringing was one of extraordinary privilege as her father, the controversial industrialist and art collector, showered his family with every luxury. Little of her father’s public reputation as a ruthless businessman and strike breaker would touch her idyllic childhood at Clayton, the family home. Helen was intensely devoted to her father, seen especially in her decision around age ten to change her given middle name to his own....

Article

Perkins, Charles Callahan (1823-1886), art critic, philanthropist, and administrator  

Robert L. Gale

Perkins, Charles Callahan (01 March 1823–25 August 1886), art critic, philanthropist, and administrator, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of James Perkins, a wealthy and generous merchant, and Eliza Greene Callahan. After early schooling in Boston and attendance at boarding schools in nearby Cambridge and in Burlington, New Jersey, Perkins entered Harvard. He disliked the curriculum there but graduated in 1843....

Article

Zimbalist, Mary Louise Curtis Bok (1876-1970), founder and president of the Curtis Institute of Music, Philadelphia, and philanthropist  

Alfred Mann

Zimbalist, Mary Louise Curtis Bok (06 August 1876–04 January 1970), founder and president of the Curtis Institute of Music, Philadelphia, and philanthropist, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the daughter of Cyrus H. K. Curtis and Louisa Knapp. When she was an infant the family moved to Philadelphia, where her father became an eminently successful publisher of newspapers and periodicals. Her parents were gifted musical amateurs, and music became one of her principal subjects when she received her formal education at the Ogontz School for Young Ladies in Abington, Pennsylvania—a school to which she contributed generously in later years. Her studies in piano and music theory were ably supervised by her mother, with whom she began extensive travels to Europe at the age of thirteen. In 1893 she became engaged to ...