1-4 of 4 Results  for:

  • Social welfare and reform x
  • women's suffragist x
  • social reformer (general) x
Clear all

Article

Gellhorn, Edna Fischel (18 Dec. 1878–24 Sept. 1970), suffragist and reformer, was born Edna Fischel in St. Louis, Missouri, the eldest child of Washington Emil and Martha (Ellis) Fischel. She had three younger brothers. Her father was a professor of clinical medicine at Washington University and cofounded the Barnard Free Skin and Cancer Hospital. Her mother taught elementary school in rural districts for several years before marrying and continued teaching for some time afterward. Martha Fischel was active in social welfare work in St. Louis, establishing the first domestic science classes in the city, and serving with the Red Cross during World War I. Both Fischels were prominent members of the Ethical Culture Society of St. Louis and believed in the importance of public service; their example deeply influenced Edna’s life....

Article

Kent, Elizabeth Thacher (22 Sept. 1868–15 Aug. 1952), social reformer, suffragist, and environmentalist, was born Elizabeth Thacher in New Haven, Connecticut to Thomas Anthony Thacher, a professor and administrator at Yale, and his second wife, Elizabeth Baldwin Sherman. Both parents boasted long American lineages dating back to pre-Revolutionary times. Called “Bessie” or “Bess,” the young Elizabeth was the only girl among nine children in the blended family. She attended private schools in Connecticut. She shared a close bond with her cousin, Elizabeth Selden White, who lived nearby. The cousins married Yale classmates of Elizabeth’s brother William. Elizabeth Thacher married William Kent in ...

Article

Laidlaw, Harriet Burton (16 Dec. 1873–25 Jan. 1949), suffragist, essayist, and social reformer, was born Harriet Davenport Wright Burton in Albany, New York, the oldest of three children and only daughter of George Davidson Burton, a bank teller, and Alice Davenport Wright. After her father’s death in ...

Article

Lewis, Dora Kelly (13 Oct. 1862–31 Jan. 1928), social reformer and suffragist, was born Dora Kuhl Kelly in Chester, Pennsylvania, the fourth of six surviving children of parents Henry Kuhl Kelly and the former Louisa Warner Hard. Both sides of the prominent Irish-German Kelly-Hard family traced their ancestry back to colonial America. Henry Kelly, a Civil War veteran, worked in the sugar industry. Louisa Kelly was admired for her fervent religiosity and taught her children to use the Bible as a living guide. Dora Kelly married attorney Lawrence Lewis in ...