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Adams, Comfort Avery (01 November 1868–21 February 1958), engineering professor and consulting engineer, was born in Cleveland, Ohio, the son of Comfort Avery Adams and Katherine Emily Peticolas. Although the family experienced stringent financial circumstances during Adams’s youth, he entered Case Institute of Applied Science (now part of Case Western Reserve University) after attending public schools in Cleveland. At Case he was laboratory assistant to a young physicist, ...

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Eddy, Harrison Prescott (29 April 1870–15 June 1937), consulting sanitary engineer, was born in Millbury, Massachusetts, the son of William Justus Eddy, the treasurer of a textile mill, and Martha Augusta Prescott. Eddy attended public school in Worcester, Massachusetts, and then enrolled at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute, where in 1851 he received a B.S. in chemistry. At the institute, he studied under Leonard P. Kinnicutt, a leading sanitary chemist, who would play a continuing role in Eddy’s life....

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Hunt, Robert Woolston (09 December 1838–11 July 1923), metallurgist and consulting engineer, was born in Fallsington, Pennsylvania, the son of Robert A. Hunt and Martha Lancaster. Hunt’s father, a retired doctor, had opened a drugstore in Covington, Kentucky, but he died when Hunt was seventeen, leaving the boy unable to afford further formal education. Robert ran his father’s business for two years but in 1857 moved to Pottsville, Pennsylvania, where he began working at John Burnish & Company, an iron rolling mill in which his cousin was a partner. Here Hunt was exposed to the practicalities of the iron industry as a puddler and roller. Following a course in analytical chemistry at the laboratory of Booth, Garrett & Reese in Philadelphia, Hunt found employment as a chemist in 1860 with the Cambria Iron Company in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, where he established the first analytical chemical laboratory as an integral component of an American ironworks....

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Steinman, David Barnard (11 June 1886–21 August 1960), consulting engineer, was born in New York City, the son of Louis Kelvin Steinman, a factory worker, and Eva Scollard. Steinman graduated from the City College of New York in 1906 and went on to study engineering at Columbia University. Throughout this period he worked as a part-time instructor in the New York City public schools. Having completed his graduate course work at Columbia in 1910, he was hired as an instructor of civil engineering at the University of Idaho. With the publication of his thesis on suspension and cantilever bridges in 1911, he received a Ph.D. in engineering. At Idaho he advanced to the position of professor, and by the time he resigned in 1914 to return to New York, his expertise as a civil engineer had enabled him to make a number of physical improvements to the campus. In 1915 he married Irene Stella Hoffman; they had one daughter and two sons....

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Stuart, Francis Lee (03 December 1866–15 January 1935), civil engineer and consulting engineer, was born in Camden, South Carolina, the only son of Barnwell Rhett Stuart and Emma Croome Lee. Orphaned by the death of his parents at age two, Stuart was raised by his grandmother until age eleven. When his grandmother passed away, an uncle in the Georgetown section of Washington, D.C., took the boy in. In 1882 Stuart graduated from the Emerson Institute in Washington, D.C....

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Teeple, John Edgar (04 January 1874–23 March 1931), chemical engineer, was born in Kempton, Illinois, the son of William Harvey Teeple and Abby May Hinckley. He attended Valparaiso University in Indiana, earning his B.S. in 1893 and an A.B. the following year. He subsequently spent four years as instructor of chemistry and mathematics at Fremont College in Nebraska. In 1897 he married Lina Pease, with whom he had three children. In 1898 Teeple continued his education at Cornell University, taking graduate courses in chemistry and earning a B.S. in 1899. He then taught for five years at Cornell as an instructor in organic and physiological chemistry and earned his Ph.D. from Cornell in 1903....

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Warner, Edward Pearson (09 November 1894–12 July 1958), aeronautical engineer and aviation consultant, was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the son of Robert Lyon Warner, an electrical engineer, and Ann Pearson. Warner was raised in a professional environment—his father had been educated at Cornell—and attended the elite Volkmann School in Boston after his father accepted a position in Cambridge. Early in his education, Warner displayed a remarkable aptitude for mathematics, and since he was interested in aviation he turned his attention to solving the problems of flight. In 1911 he and a friend won a soaring competition in Boston, Warner designing the glider and his friend piloting it. Warner attended Harvard University, receiving a B.A. in engineering with honors in 1916. He then pursued additional work at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), earning a B.S. and then an M.A. in 1919....