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D. Hayes Agnew. Courtesy of the National Library of Medicine (B011345).

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Agnew, D. Hayes (24 November 1818–22 March 1892), surgeon and medical educator, was born David Hayes Agnew in Nobleville (Christiana), Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, the son of Robert Agnew, a physician, and Agnes Noble. In 1833 Agnew, who grew up in a deeply religious Presbyterian household, entered Jefferson College at Cannonsburg, a stronghold of Presbyterianism in western Pennsylvania. In 1834 Agnew left Jefferson to attend Newark College, established in that year by the Delaware legislature, where his cousin, the Reverend John Holmes Agnew, was professor of languages. With other students at Newark he founded the Athenaeum Literary Society, but when his cousin left in 1835, objecting to a lottery that supported the college, Agnew left with him. After studying medicine at home under his father, Agnew entered the Medical Department of the University of Pennsylvania in 1836—one of the youngest members of the class. Agnew received his M.D. in 1838. The title of his graduating thesis was “Medical Science and the Responsibility of Medical Character.”...

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Antony, Milton (07 August 1789–19 September 1839), physician and educator, was born presumably in Henry County, Virginia, the son of James Antony, Sr., a military officer, and Ann Tate. At sixteen, he became an apprentice under physician Joel Abbott of Monticello, Georgia. At nineteen he enrolled in the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine but, owing to economic circumstances, had to leave without a diploma. He married Nancy Godwin in 1809. They had eleven children....

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Augusta, Alexander Thomas (08 March 1825–21 December 1890), physician and medical educator, was born a free African American in Norfolk, Virginia, to parents whose names and occupations are unknown. Augusta received his early education from a Bishop Payne, defying a law that forbade African Americans to read or write. He continued to improve his reading skills while working as an apprentice to a barber. His interest in medicine led him to relocate to Baltimore, Maryland, where he studied with private tutors. Eventually, Augusta moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to serve an apprenticeship. Although he was denied entry to the University of Pennsylvania, Augusta caught the attention of Professor ...

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Beck, Claude Schaeffer (08 November 1894–14 October 1971), surgeon and educator, was born in Shamokin, Pennsylvania, the son of Simon Beck and Martha Schaeffer. He attended public schools in Shamokin, graduating as valedictorian of his high school class in 1911. After graduating from Millersville State Normal School in Reading, Pennsylvania, in 1914, he continued his undergraduate education at Franklin and Marshall College in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, receiving his A.B. in 1916. Inspired by one of his professors, Richard Schiedt, to enter the field of medicine, Beck enrolled at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, completing his M.D. in 1921....

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John B. Beck. Courtesy of the National Library of Medicine (B01427).

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Beck, John Brodhead (18 September 1794–09 April 1851), medical professor, was born in Schenectady, New York, the son of Caleb Beck, a lawyer, and Catharine Theresa Romeyn. Caleb Beck died in 1798, and Catharine Beck, powerfully committed to a thorough education for each of her five young sons, placed John in the home of her uncle, the Reverend John B. Romeyn, a Dutch Reformed theologian then living in Rhinebeck, New York. Under Romeyn’s tutelage, Beck studied classical languages....

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Theodric Romeyn Beck. Courtesy of the National Library of Medicine (B02600).

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Beck, Theodric Romeyn (11 August 1791–19 November 1855), physician and professor, was born in Schenectady, New York, the son of Caleb Beck, a lawyer, and Catharine Theresa Romeyn, the daughter of the Reverend Derick Romeyn, a founder of Union College. After Caleb died in 1798, Catharine Beck assumed responsibility for raising their five sons....

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Bender, Lauretta (09 August 1897–04 January 1987), child psychiatrist, researcher, and educator, was born in Butte, Montana, the daughter of John Bender, a lawyer, and Katherine Irvine. Her father had moved to Montana to seek business opportunities with copper companies. Disappointed by failures, the Benders moved to Washington State and then to Hollywood, California. Bender repeated first grade three times because she suffered from a form of dyslexia. Her parents and teachers at first thought she was mentally defective but realized that she could learn by listening as well as by reading....

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Berry, George Packer (29 December 1898–05 October 1986), immunologist and medical educator, was born in Troy, New York, the son of the Reverend George Titus Berry and Carrie Electa Packer. Following preparatory education at the Hill School in Pottstown, Pennsylvania, he attended Princeton University, from which he received an A.B. with the highest honors in biology in 1921. After obtaining his M.D. from the Johns Hopkins Medical School in 1925, Berry trained as a house officer at the Johns Hopkins Hospital (1925–1927) and was afterwards assistant resident physician (1927–1928) and instructor in medicine at the Johns Hopkins Medical School (1928–1929). He joined the Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research in 1929, where he was assistant and later associate; he also served as assistant resident physician at the hospital of the Rockefeller Institute. At Rockefeller he worked with such well-known investigators as ...

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Bigelow, Henry Jacob (11 March 1818–30 October 1890), surgeon and medical educator, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Jacob Bigelow, a physician, and Mary Scollay. After graduation from Harvard College in 1837, Bigelow studied medicine with his father, supplementing his preceptorship with attendance at medical lectures at Harvard and Dartmouth medical schools. Although Dr. ...

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Bryant, Joseph Decatur (12 March 1845–07 April 1914), surgeon and medical educator, was born in East Troy, Wisconsin, the son of Alonzo Ambrose Bryant and Harriet Atkins, farmers. He completed his early education in the local public schools and received his secondary education at a private academy in Norwich, New York, near his father’s boyhood home. He then moved to New York City to study medicine with George W. Avery, a local physician, and attend Bellevue Hospital Medical College, where he received an M.D. in 1868....

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James Lawrence Cabell. Courtesy of the National Library of Medicine (B04041).

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Cabell, James Lawrence (26 August 1813–13 August 1889), teacher of medicine and sanitarian, was born in Nelson County, Virginia, the son of George Cabell, a physician, and Susanna Wyatt. George Cabell’s brother Joseph was a founder of the University of Virginia. In 1839 James Cabell married Margaret Gibbons. They had no children of their own but did adopt two nieces....

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Hugh Cabot. Courtesy of the Clendening History of Medicine Library, University of Kansas Medical Center.

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Cabot, Hugh (11 August 1872–14 August 1945), surgeon, educator, and medical reformer, was born in Beverly Farms, Massachusetts, the son of James Elliot Cabot, an architect, naturalist, and graduate of Harvard Law School, and Elizabeth Dwight. The youngest of seven boys, Cabot was an active child, exposed to music, the Unitarian religion, the challenge of the outdoors, and his parents’ philanthropic ideals. His privileged yet altruistic upbringing underlay his future productive life....

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Charles Caldwell. Courtesy of the National Library of Medicine (B04072).

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Caldwell, Charles (14 May 1772–09 July 1853), physician, author, and teacher, was born in Caswell County, North Carolina, the son of Charles Caldwell, a farmer. His mother’s maiden name was Murray, although her given name is unknown. Caldwell’s father was an elder in the Presbyterian church and wanted Charles to become a minister. Accordingly, from the age of eleven to fourteen, Caldwell studied Latin and classical literature at a Latin school operated by Dominie Harris in Mecklenburg County. By the time Caldwell left Harris’s school, however, he had decided against a religious career....

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Chaillé, Stanford Emerson (09 July 1830–27 May 1911), physician, medical educator, and sanitarian, was born in Natchez, Mississippi, the son of William Hamilton Chaillé, a planter, and Mary Eunice Stanford. Chaillé’s father died when he was six, and after his mother’s death in 1844 he went to live with relatives in Boston. He graduated from Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts, and attended Harvard University, where he received his B.A. in 1851 and his M.A. in 1854....