1-9 of 9 Results  for:

  • Christian: independent churches x
  • Sex: Female x
Clear all

Article

Allen, Catherine (1851-1922), Shaker eldress  

Stephen J. Paterwic

Allen, Catherine (03 September 1851–05 June 1922), Shaker eldress, was born Minnie Catherine Allen in Patriot, Indiana, the daughter of John Allen, a clergyman and reformer, and Ellen Lazarus, a reformer. Allen was born on property purchased by her mother in hopes of establishing another socialistic community like Brook Farm. When no one agreed to engage in this experiment, the family moved in 1857 to the Modern Times Colony in Brentwood, Long Island. At the request of her mother, Allen was brought as a boarder to the North Family of Shakers in Mount Lebanon, New York, on 2 February 1865. Her reception into the Shaker society was somewhat unique because the Shakers rarely accepted children if both parents were alive and neither of them planned to join the community. No doubt Allen was accepted because of her parents’ long association with communities such as Brook Farm and because they were sympathetic to the Shakers....

Article

Barker, Ruth Mildred (1897-1990), Shaker trustee  

Jane F. Crosthwaite

Barker, Ruth Mildred (03 February 1897–25 January 1990), Shaker trustee, was born in Providence, Rhode Island, the daughter of James P. Barker and Ruth Jackson. Her father died in 1903, and that year, unable to care for Mildred, her mother took her to the Alfred, Maine, community of the United Society of Believers in Christ’s Second Appearing, informally known as the Shakers. Barker, who came to be known as Sister Mildred, grew up within the Alfred community, signed the covenant, and worked primarily as a caretaker of young girls. She moved to Sabbathday Lake, southwest of Lewiston, Maine, in 1931 with the consolidation of the two communities....

Article

Jackson, Rebecca Cox (1795-1871), itinerant preacher, religious writer, and Shaker eldress  

Jean McMahon Humez

Jackson, Rebecca Cox (15 February 1795–24 May 1871), itinerant preacher, religious writer, and Shaker eldress, was born a free African American in Horntown, Pennsylvania. According to sketchy autobiographical information, she was the daughter of Jane (maiden name unknown) Cox. No reference is made in her writings to her father, who probably died shortly after her birth. Rebecca Cox lived with her grandmother (never named) until she was between three and four years old, but by age six she was again living with her mother, who had remarried and was now called Jane Wisson or Wilson. Her stepfather, a sailor, died at sea the next year. At age ten, she was in Philadelphia with her mother and a younger sister and infant brother, the offspring, it seems, of a third marriage of her mother. Responsibility for caring for her younger siblings seems to have deprived Rebecca of the schooling her mother was somehow able to provide for the other children. Her mother died when she was thirteen, whereupon she probably moved into the household of her older brother Joseph Cox (1778?–1843), a tanner and clergyman eighteen years her senior....

Article

King, Emma Belle (1873-1966), Shaker eldress  

Erika M. Butler

King, Emma Belle (05 June 1873–01 July 1966), Shaker eldress, was born in Providence, Rhode Island, the daughter of Daniel Sylvester King, a carpenter and horsecar conductor, and Nancy Ellen Rowley. Emma and her sister Mary Ellen King were placed with the Shakers (United Society of Believers in Christ’s Second Appearing) in Canterbury, New Hampshire, in 1878. There is some indication that a brother, Daniel S. King, arrived several years later in 1881. Although there is little record of Emma’s parents or how she came to be placed in Canterbury, it is clear that her mother lodged with the Shakers at one point. Of her father’s whereabouts the records say nothing. King does refer, however, in a memorial written for Sister Lizzie Horton, to a period in her childhood in which she was “in grief over the demise of a much loved father.”...

Article

Lee, Ann (29 February 1736–08 September 1784), visionary, prophetess, and founder of the Shakers (later formally the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing)  

Stephen J. Stein

Lee, Ann (29 February 1736–08 September 1784), visionary, prophetess, and founder of the Shakers (later formally the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing), visionary, prophetess, and founder of the Shakers (later formally the United Society of Believers in Christ’s Second Appearing), was born in Manchester, England, the daughter of John Lees, a blacksmith, and his wife, a “very pious woman.” Lee, one of eight children, was baptized in Christ Church on 1 June 1742. She received little, if any, formal education. Tradition has it that she worked in a cotton factory and also as a cutter of hatters’ fur. In 1762 she married Abraham Standerin (also identified as Stanley and Standley), a blacksmith. They both signed the register in the cathedral with only a mark. It is reported that she had four children, all of whom died in infancy or at an early age. The burial record of one daughter, Elizabeth, age six, does exist....

Article

Lindsay, Bertha (1897-1990), Shaker eldress  

Erika M. Butler

Lindsay, Bertha (28 July 1897–03 October 1990), Shaker eldress, was born Goldie Ina Ruby Lindsay in Braintree, Massachusetts, the daughter of Lloyd E. Lindsay, a mechanic, grocer, and photographer, and Abbie H. Smith. Goldie arrived at the Canterbury Shaker Village (United Society of Believers in Christ’s Second Appearing) in 1905, after the death of her parents. Her sister May, in her mid-twenties at the time, was about to marry and head west. The family, Baptists, had worshiped at the village; the Shakers were known to take in young children, and so they were asked to care for her. Years later, when she signed the covenant in 1918, Goldie took the name “Bertha” as a way of honoring Sister Bertha Lillian Phelps, in whose care she had been as a teenager and whom she considered her spiritual mother....

Article

Taylor, Leila Sarah (1854-1923), Shaker author, poet, and associate eldress  

Stephen J. Paterwic

Taylor, Leila Sarah (11 December 1854–29 June 1923), Shaker author, poet, and associate eldress, was born in Westfield, Massachusetts, the daughter of Wesley Taylor, a homeopathic physician, and Sarah Moore. She attended Boston University during the early 1870s and studied English. For two decades she taught high school classes in various Connecticut Valley towns, including Springfield. In 1893 she was elected a teacher in Wayland, a distant suburb of Boston. When the new Wayland Center School opened in 1897, she became the principal and helped teach high school and the upper grammar school grades....

Article

White, Anna (1831-1910), Shaker eldress, author, and songwriter  

Stephen J. Paterwic

White, Anna (21 January 1831–16 December 1910), Shaker eldress, author, and songwriter, was born in Brooklyn, New York, the daughter of Robert White, a businessman and farmer, and Hannah Gibbs, an almoner (a distributor of goods to the needy) for the Quakers. White was educated at Mansion Square Seminary, a Quaker school, in Poughkeepsie, New York. When she was seventeen she learned the tailoring trade and helped her mother distribute alms from the Quakers to the poor of New York City. Her father had become a Shaker and divided his time between living with his natural family and residing with the Shakers. His decision to become a Shaker angered his wife and alienated all his children except Anna who also became interested. Every effort was made to dissuade her from Shakerism, and an uncle even proposed to settle $40,000 on her if she would give up thinking about it....

Article

Wright, Lucy (05 February 1760–07 February 1821), first Elder of the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing (the Shakers)  

Jean M. Humez

Wright, Lucy (05 February 1760–07 February 1821), first Elder of the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing (the Shakers), first Elder of the United Society of Believers in Christ’s Second Appearing (the Shakers), was born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, the daughter of John Wright and Martha “Molly” Robbins. John Wright is characterized by Shaker historian ...