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Clarke, Parker (03 April 1748–25 March 1823), surgeon and soldier, was born in Ipswich, Massachusetts, the son of Parker Clarke and Lydia Phillips. In 1769 he married Judith Lunt; they had three sons. After obtaining some medical training in New England, Clarke immigrated to Cumberland Township on the Isthmus of Chignecto in Nova Scotia. By 1770 he was living in Fort Lawrence, where he farmed and practiced medicine as a prominent member of the New England planter community, which by then formed the majority of the population on the isthmus and throughout Nova Scotia....

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Culpeper, John (1644–1693), proprietary official and rebellion leader, first appears in the records of Barbados in 1663 when at age nineteen he wrote the will of a neighbor and served as the overseer of his estate. The same document also mentions a Margaret Culpeper, who was surely related to him. By February 1671 Culpeper had arrived in southern Carolina with a slave, and at the end of the year his wife, Judith, joined him, accompanied by a woman servant. Within a month of his arrival in Charles Town, the able Culpeper had replaced the inadequate surveyor of the province. His extant map of Charles Town was the first accurate plat of the settlement. A year later his commission from the lords proprietor as surveyor general, dated 30 December 1671, was received about the time he was elected to the provincial assembly. By the end of 1672, in addition to his 2-acre town lot where he was residing, Culpeper was granted a 370-acre plantation....

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Faulkner, Thomas (1743–07 July 1803), soldier, was born in New England, the son of Edward Faulkner and Martha Stewart. Faulkner immigrated to Nova Scotia in the early 1760s, settling in the Cobequid district on the north shore of Minas Basin. This prosperous farming district included the townships of Truro, Onslow, and Londonderry, and it had a population, primarily composed of New Englanders of Scotch-Irish background, that amounted to perhaps 1,000 people in 1775. Noted for its antipathy to the central government at Halifax, Cobequid was characteristically in the forefront of political opposition to Governor Francis Legge’s militia legislation of late 1775. This legislation imposed a tax to support the militia, a portion of which would be drawn from outlying districts to defend the capital of Halifax....

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Girty, Simon (1741–18 February 1818), British Loyalist and frontier warrior, was born near Harrisburg in colonial Pennsylvania, the son of farmers. One of at least four children born to Simon Girty and Mary Newton, young Simon was raised in modest circumstances. He received no formal education and remained illiterate. When only ten years of age, his father was killed by an Indian. Girty later maintained that his stepfather met a similar fate. In the course of the French and Indian War, Simon was captured by the Seneca and held captive for thirty-six months. During his captivity, Girty became familiar with the language of his captors....

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Whipple, Prince (fl. 1776–1783), revolutionary war soldier, was born to unknown parents in Amabou, Africa. When Whipple was about ten, his parents sent him to America with either a brother or cousin, ostensibly to be educated in the manner of Prince’s older brother, who had returned from America four years before. Unfortunately, the captain of the ship on which the two boys traveled diverted to Baltimore, Maryland, and sold them into slavery instead....

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Youngs, John (baptized 10 Apr. 1623–12 April 1698), political agitator and public official, was born at Southwold, England, the son of John Youngs, a Puritan minister, and Joan Herrington. Although forbidden to leave England in May 1637, the elder Youngs was in Salem, Massachusetts, with his family in December of that year and in the New Haven colony in 1638; in 1640 he founded the town of Southold at the east end of Long Island. The younger John Youngs acquired and developed land throughout Southold. In 1653 he married his stepsister, Mary Gardner, and they had five children. She died in 1689, and about 1691 he married Hannah (Wines) Tooker, a widow....