1-20 of 21 results  for:

  • Medicine and health x
  • gynecologist x
Clear all

Article

Byford, William Heath (20 March 1817–21 May 1890), gynecologist and advocate of medical education for women, was born in Eaton, Ohio, the son of Henry Byford, a mechanic, and Hannah Swain. Henry Byford moved his family to southwestern Indiana shortly after William’s birth and died there nine years later. Young William did odd jobs to help out, but about 1830 Hannah Byford had to move the family to her father’s farm in Crawford County, Illinois. During the next few years William often asked to be allowed to learn a trade to help support the family and improve his own prospects. He finally became apprenticed to a tailor, who moved away two years later. At this time William decided on medicine for his career, although he never mentioned the reason. His reading and studies in chemistry, physiology, and natural history may have steered him in this direction....

Article

Chadwick, James Read (02 November 1844–23 September 1905), gynecologist and medical librarian, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Christopher Champlin Chadwick and Louisa Read, the daughter of a well-to-do Boston merchant. James was named after his grandfather, with whom in 1844 his father entered into partnership as domestic goods commission merchants, the firm of Read and Chadwick then commencing a period of great prosperity. James Read Chadwick was educated in the Boston schools and at Harvard College, graduating with an A.B. in 1865. After an extended trip abroad, he entered the Harvard Medical School in 1867 and received an M.D. in 1871, submitting a thesis on tracheotomy, as illustrated by cases in the records of the Massachusetts General Hospital. That same year he married Katherine M. Lyman, daughter of Dr. George H. Lyman, one of the pioneers in Boston in treating the diseases of women, a field in which Chadwick then began to train. The couple had four children....

Article

Dickinson, Robert Latou (21 February 1861–29 November 1950), gynecologist and sexologist, was born in Jersey City, New Jersey, the son of Horace Dickinson, a hat manufacturer, and Jeannette Latou. During Dickinson’s childhood the family business was located in Brooklyn, New York, where the Dickinsons and Latous were civic and cultural leaders. Dickinson enjoyed a privileged childhood in Brooklyn Heights, with summers on an uncle’s Connecticut farm. When he was twelve, his father took the family to Europe for four years, during which the children were privately tutored and attended schools in Switzerland and Germany. The Dickinsons returned to the United States in 1876. Robert entered Brooklyn Polytechnic Institute and completed the equivalent of the last years of high school in 1879....

Article

Emmet, Thomas Addis (29 May 1828–01 March 1919), surgeon and gynecologist, was born in Charlottesville, Virginia, the son of John Patten Emmet, a professor of natural history at the University of Virginia, and Mary Boyd Tucker. Emmet briefly attended the University of Virginia in 1845. However, he was more interested in natural history and hiking in the woods than in attending classes, and he was asked to withdraw. Nonetheless, during his early years in Charlottesville, Emmet was greatly influenced by ...

Article

Hurd-Mead, Kate Campbell (06 April 1867–01 January 1941), gynecologist and women's historian, gynecologist and women’s historian, was born Kate Campbell Hurd in Danville, Quebec, Canada, the daughter of Edward Payson Hurd, a physician, and Sara Elizabeth Campbell. Hurd’s family moved to Newburyport, Massachusetts, in 1870; there her father, who served as an inspiration to her own medical career, established a medical practice, held a professorship in a Boston medical school, and served on the editorial board of two leading medical magazines. Hurd pursued two years of private tutorials after her 1883 high school graduation in Newburyport before enrolling in the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. She received an M.D. in 1888, some thirty-seven years after the college awarded its first medical degree to a woman. She interned the following year at the New England Hospital for Women and Children in Boston. This hospital, founded in 1862, had, by Hurd’s time, gained a national reputation for being what medical historian Regina Markell Morantz-Sanchez has dubbed the “showplace for quality medical care” administered by women. Under the leadership of ...

Article

Hurdon, Elizabeth (28 January 1868–29 January 1941), gynecologist and pathologist, was born in Bodmin, England, the daughter of John Hurdon, a linen and woolen draper, and Ann Coom. Soon after her birth, the Hurdons and their two daughters moved to Canada. Not much is known about Elizabeth’s early years, but by age thirteen she was attending the Wesleyan Ladies College in Hamilton, Ontario, where in 1886 she received a degree in literature. In 1895 she received a medical degree from the Trinity College of the University of Toronto....

Image

Howard Atwood Kelly. Courtesy of the Clendening History of Medicine Library, University of Kansas Medical Center.

Article

Kelly, Howard Atwood (20 February 1858–12 January 1943), surgeon, gynecologist, and medical biographer, was born in Camden, New Jersey, the son of Henry Kuhl Kelly, a prosperous sugar broker, and Louise Warner Hard, the daughter of an Episcopal clergyman. During his youth, Kelly’s mother instilled in him a love of the Bible and the natural sciences. He attended the University of Pennsylvania, receiving the A.B. in 1877. Kelly originally intended to become a naturalist, but his father persuaded him to study medicine so that he would have a more secure income. In 1882 he received his M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. He then served sixteen months as resident physician at the Episcopal Hospital in Kensington, a Philadelphia suburb with many poor. In 1883, upon completion of his internship, Kelly established a two-room “hospital,” which by 1887 evolved into the Kensington Hospital for Women and was supported by voluntary contributions. In 1888 Kelly performed the first caesarean section in Philadelphia in fifty years in which the mother survived. Among his colleagues this did much to enhance his reputation as a bold and skillful surgeon. During the year 1888–1889 he served as associate professor of obstetrics at the School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania....

Article

Levine, Lena (17 May 1903–09 January 1965), gynecologist, psychiatrist, and pioneer of the birth control movement, was born in Brooklyn, New York, the daughter of Morris H. Levine, a clothing manufacturer, and Sophie Levine. Her parents, Jewish émigrés from Russia, had come to the United States in the 1890s. Her father’s business did well enough that the family lived relatively comfortably compared to their neighbors. Levine received a bachelor’s degree from Hunter College in 1923, and then went on to earn her M.D. from University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College in 1927. Two years later she married Louis Ferber, another medical student, but decided to retain her maiden name. They both did their residencies at Brooklyn Jewish Hospital....

Image

Franklin Henry Martin. Courtesy of the Clendening History of Medicine Library, University of Kansas Medical Center.

Article

Martin, Franklin Henry (13 July 1857–07 March 1935), surgeon, organizer, and editor, was born on a farm near Ixonia, Wisconsin, the son of Edmond Martin and Josephine Carlin, farmers. Martin’s father died in the Union army in 1862. Five years later his mother remarried, and young Martin was put under the care of his maternal grandparents. After passing the teacher’s examination, he taught at several village schools....

Article

Meigs, Charles Delucena (19 February 1792–22 June 1869), physician and teacher, was born in St. George, Bermuda, the son of Josiah Meigs, an editor, educator, and lawyer, and Clara Benjamin. Josiah, although born and raised in Connecticut, was serving as a proctor in the English courts of admiralty in Bermuda when Meigs, the fifth of ten children, was born. The family moved back to Connecticut in 1794, and soon thereafter Meigs’s father was elected professor of mathematics and natural philosophy at Yale College. After six years in New Haven, the family moved to Athens, Georgia, when the father was appointed president of the University of Georgia....

Article

Morris, John McLean (01 September 1914–08 April 1993), reproductive biologist and physician, was born in Kuling, China, the son of DuBois Morris, a Presbyterian missionary and pastor of Presbyterian Church in Manhattan, and Alice Buell. The suffering and cruelty Morris witnessed in China as a child had a lasting influence on his life. He later spoke of seeing people stepping over the bodies of the dead and dying in the streets. His interest in women’s health and reproductive issues stemmed from the widespread infanticide of baby girls he saw in China....

Image

Theophilus Parvin. Courtesy of the Clendening History of Medicine Library, University of Kansas Medical Center.

Article

Parvin, Theophilus (09 January 1829–29 January 1898), obstetrician and gynecologist, was born in Buenos Aires, Argentina, the son of Theophilus Parvin, a minister-missionary, and Mary Rodney. His mother was the daughter of Caesar Augustus Rodney, U.S. attorney general in the cabinets of Presidents ...

Article

Putnam, Helen Cordelia (14 September 1857–03 February 1951), physician and public health reformer, was born in Stockton, Minnesota, the daughter of Herbert Asa Putnam, a general store owner, and Celintha T. Gates. She received her A.B. from Vassar College in 1878 and then enrolled in Harvard University’s Sargent School of Physical Training. In 1883, having completed that school’s course of study, she returned to Vassar as director of physical education. Shortly thereafter she became active in the affairs of the American Association for the Advancement of Physical Education and served as its vice president from 1885 to 1888. She also enrolled in the Woman’s Medical College of Pennsylvania, where she specialized in obstetrics and the diseases of women and received her M.D. in 1889. In 1890 she left Vassar to become an intern at the New England Hospital for Women and Children in Boston. Two years later she moved to Providence, Rhode Island, where she practiced gynecology for the next forty-three years....

Article

Sims, J. Marion (25 January 1813–12 November 1883), pioneer gynecologist, was born James Marion Sims in Lancaster, South Carolina, the son of John Sims, a farmer and hotel keeper, and Mahala Mackey. He was educated at South Carolina College, where he received a B.A. in 1832. He decided to enter medicine and began by apprenticing to a local doctor, Churchill Jones. After attending lectures at the Medical College of Charleston, he obtained his medical diploma from Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia in 1835. Sims launched his practice in Mount Meigs, Alabama, and in 1836 married Eliza Theresa Jones. In 1849 the couple settled with their extended family in Montgomery, Alabama. They had at least five children....

Article

Skene, Alexander Johnston Chalmers (17 June 1837–04 July 1900), gynecologist and professor of medicine, was born in Fyvie, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, the son of Johnston Skene and Jean McConachie. He was educated in local schools and then attended King’s College in Aberdeen (now part of the university) before emigrating to North America at the age of nineteen. He studied medicine in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, in 1860, and at the University of Michigan in 1861 and 1862; he then went to New York and earned his M.D. degree from the Long Island College Hospital Medical School, Brooklyn, in 1863. Immediately afterward, during the Civil War, Skene served for a year in South Carolina as an assistant surgeon with the Union volunteer corps. He later renewed his military connections when, in 1884 and 1885, he was surgeon on the staff of the commander of the New York State National Guard....

Article

Storer, Horatio Robinson (27 February 1830–18 September 1922), pioneer gynecologist and anti-abortion crusader, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of David Humphreys Storer, a prominent naturalist and medical professor, and Abby Jane Brewer. His father had written on the fishes of Massachusetts and North America, helped establish the Tremont Street Medical School in Boston, and eventually taught obstetrics and medical jurisprudence at Harvard Medical School. Storer followed remarkably similar professional interests....

Article

Taussig, Frederick Joseph (26 October 1872–21 August 1943), gynecologist, was born in Brooklyn, New York, the son of Joseph S. Taussig, a banker, and Mary L. Cuno. He grew up in St. Louis, Missouri, and graduated from Harvard University with an A.B. in 1893 and from the Washington University Medical School in St. Louis in 1898. Following medical school he interned in St. Louis and then studied gynecology in Berlin and Vienna. In 1902 he set up a private practice in St. Louis, where he resided for the remainder of his career. In the same year he joined the staff of the Washington University Medical School, achieving the rank of professor of clinical obstetrics and gynecology in 1911. He married Florence Gottschalk in 1907; they had two children. He was elected president of the American Gynecological Society (1936–1937), and he became a director of the American Society for the Control of Cancer in 1938....