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Frary, Francis Cowles (09 July 1884–04 February 1970), chemical engineer, was born in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the son of Francis Lee Frary, a merchant, and Jeanette Cowles. Frary was educated at the University of Minnesota, where he earned an A.C. degree (1905) and an M.S. (1906) in chemistry. He studied in Berlin in 1906–1907, then returned to Minnesota to complete a Ph.D. in chemistry (1912). He married Alice Hall Wingate in 1908; they had two children....

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Frasch, Herman (25 December 1851–01 May 1914), chemist, chemical engineer, and inventor, was born in Gaildorf, Wuerttemberg, Germany, the son of Johannes Frasch, a prosperous pharmacist and burgomaster of the town; his mother’s name is not recorded. Frasch was educated at the Gymnasium and then apprenticed to a pharmacist but decided to come to the United States at age seventeen. He settled in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he became an assistant in the laboratory of Professor ...

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Houdry, Eugene Jules (18 April 1892–18 July 1962), chemical engineer, was born in Domont, France, the son of Jules Houdry, a steel-mill owner, and Émilie Thaïs Julie Lemaire. He studied mechanical engineering at the École des Arts et Métiers in Paris and in 1911 received his degree, as well as a gold medal from the French government for graduating first in his class. He then went to work with his father as a junior partner and engineer and developed a keen interest in the fledgling sport of automobile racing. Drafted into the French army at the beginning of World War I and assigned to the tank corps, Houdry rose to the rank of lieutenant; in 1917 he was badly wounded while repairing a damaged tank in the middle of a battle. He received the croix de guerre for bravery under fire and was made a chevalier in the Legion of Honor....

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Lewis, Warren Kendall (21 August 1882–09 March 1975), chemical engineer, was born in Laurel, Delaware, the son of Henry Clay Lewis and Martha Ellen Kinder, farmers. Lewis’s early education was in the public schools of Laurel. His parents, hoping to give him better educational opportunities, sent him to relatives in Newton, Massachusetts, to complete his high school education. He entered the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1901, studying in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering and receiving a B.S. in 1905. Upon graduating he became an assistant to William Hurtz Walker, a chemistry professor at MIT, who soon established the Research Laboratory of Applied Chemistry (1908). With this background, Lewis went to Germany under an Austin Traveling Fellowship, receiving a doctorate in chemistry in 1908 from the University of Breslau (now Wroclaw, Poland)....

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Little, Arthur Dehon (15 December 1863–01 August 1935), chemical engineer and industrial researcher, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Thomas Jones Little, a U.S. Army captain who was wounded during the Civil War, and Amelia Hixon. When the war ended, his father was granted a modest pension, and the family relocated to Portland, Maine. As a young boy Little demonstrated an unusual talent for both writing and chemistry; an essay he wrote about the marine life in Portland’s Casco Bay won second prize in a contest sponsored by Harvard University, and at age thirteen he and a friend built a rudimentary chemical laboratory in the Littles’ basement after nearly blowing up the house the year before. Recognizing their son’s giftedness, in 1877 his parents sent him to New York City to obtain his high school education at the privately run Berkeley School. In 1881 he matriculated at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he became cofounder and editor in chief of the student newspaper while majoring in chemistry. In 1884, when his family’s deteriorating financial situation precluded his continuing his formal education, he went to work for the Richmond Paper Company’s wood pulp mill in Rumford, Rhode Island....

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Othmer, Donald F. (11 May 1904–01 November 1995), chemical engineer, was born Donald Frederick Othmer in Omaha, Nebraska, the son of Frederick Othmer, a sheet metal worker, and Fredericka Darling Othmer. The family's finances were modest and Othmer claimed he earned every penny he spent, since he worked a paper route for 35 cents a week at age ten. He developed his engineering skills working with wood and metal in his father's shop. His inspiration for chemistry came from his Omaha Central High School teacher, Dr. H. A. Senter, a German chemist who modeled his classroom after Robert Bunsen's 1850 lab at Heidelberg University, complete with a continuous flame in the middle of the lab bench....

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Sherwood, Thomas Kilgore (25 July 1903–14 January 1976), chemical engineer and educator, was born in Columbus, Ohio, the son of Milton Worthington Sherwood and Sadie D. Tackaberry. His family soon moved to Montreal, Quebec, Canada, where he spent his youth.

After completing his bachelor of science degree at McGill University in 1923, Sherwood began graduate studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), a leading center for chemical engineering education, where he worked with W. H. Adams and ...

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Teeple, John Edgar (04 January 1874–23 March 1931), chemical engineer, was born in Kempton, Illinois, the son of William Harvey Teeple and Abby May Hinckley. He attended Valparaiso University in Indiana, earning his B.S. in 1893 and an A.B. the following year. He subsequently spent four years as instructor of chemistry and mathematics at Fremont College in Nebraska. In 1897 he married Lina Pease, with whom he had three children. In 1898 Teeple continued his education at Cornell University, taking graduate courses in chemistry and earning a B.S. in 1899. He then taught for five years at Cornell as an instructor in organic and physiological chemistry and earned his Ph.D. from Cornell in 1903....