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Leffingwell, Christopher (11 June 1734–07 November 1810), businessman and civic leader, was born in Norwich, Connecticut, the son of Benajah Leffingwell, one of the town’s wealthiest residents, and Joanna Christophers, the daughter of a New London merchant. Born to wealth and social position, Leffingwell used his advantages to increase his own fortune and to serve the community into which he was born and where he died....

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Outerbridge, Eugenius Harvey (08 March 1860–10 November 1932), merchant and civic leader, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Alexander Ewing Outerbridge, a shipping executive, and Laura C. Harvey. A member of a prominent and wealthy family that included the brothers Alexander Ewing Outerbridge, a metallurgist, and Sir Joseph Outerbridge of Bermuda, Eugenius Outerbridge was educated at Ury House, a private school in Philadelphia. At the age of sixteen he took a job with Harvey & Company, a long-established import-export firm belonging to his mother’s family, in St. John’s, Newfoundland. After two years he returned to the United States as the New York agent for the company, and in 1881 the New York office was reorganized as Harvey & Outerbridge, with Outerbridge as the sole resident partner. In 1923, when it was incorporated, he became its president. In addition to his thriving import and export business, Outerbridge was active in numerous other business ventures. He became the president, treasurer, and managing director of the Pantasote Leather Company in New York and New Jersey and was vice president and managing director of the Agasote Millboard Company of New York. In 1891 he married Ethel Boyd; they had two children. Their son, Kenneth Boyd Outerbridge, became the president of Harvey & Outerbridge after Eugenius Outerbridge’s death....

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Seligman, Joseph (22 November 1819–25 April 1880), merchant, investment banker, and New York civic leader, was born in Baiersdorf, Bavaria, the son of David Seligman and Fanny Steinhardt. Joseph, who excelled in literature and in the classics, graduated from the Erlangen Gymnasium and started to study medicine. Resentful of the economic and sociopolitical restrictions against Jews in the Germanies, he decided against a career in medicine and against one in the wool-weaving business of his father and in 1837 made the long journey on the ship ...

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Welsh, John (09 November 1805–10 April 1886), merchant, civic leader, and minister to Great Britain, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of John Welsh, a merchant, and Jemima Maris. Although trained by his father, who specialized in trade with the West Indies, Welsh entered the dry goods business and became a partner in the firm of Dulles, Wilcox, & Welsh. In 1829 he married Rebecca B. Miller, with whom he had two children before her death in 1832. In 1838 he married Mary Lowber; they had nine children. After his father died in 1854, Welsh joined his brothers Samuel and William in the family sugar-importing firm. Welsh widened his business interests by investing in and becoming president, for one disastrous year, of the North Pennsylvania Railroad, which in July 1855 began a nineteen-mile run between Philadelphia and Gwynedd. In 1856 a careless conductor caused a collision on a North Pennsylvania excursion train carrying 500 Roman Catholic girls and boys from St. Michael’s parish in Kensington. Thirty-nine children were killed and seventy-two were wounded. Deeply distressed, Welsh contributed $500 to a relief fund and gave up the presidency of the road....