1-20 of 20 results  for:

  • orchestral conductor x
Clear all

Article

Beck, Johann Heinrich (12 September 1856–26 May 1924), conductor, composer, and violinist, was born in Cleveland, Ohio, the son of Charles Beck, a businessman, and Rebecca Butler. He was one of five children, all boys, all of whom played the violin. He was educated in Cleveland and spent most of his life there, although he attended the Leipzig Conservatory from 1879 to 1882. He made his acclaimed European debut at the Leipzig Gewandhaus as violinist in his own String Quartet in C Minor. His diploma read in part: “In Theory Mr. Beck possesses highly advanced knowledge, in practical Composition, ...

Article

Bergmann, Carl (12 April 1821–10 August 1876), conductor, cellist, and composer, was born in Ebersbach, Saxony, the son of middle-class parents. His talent for music manifested itself early, and he was a pupil of Adolph Zimmerman at Zittau as early as 1827 and later studied with the organist-composer Adolph Hesse at Breslau. By 1842 he was playing cello and occasionally conducting the orchestra in Breslau and in these capacities toured central and eastern European cities between 1842 and 1848. His early compositions, written before 1848, apparently included an opera and a symphony....

Article

Dohnányi, Ernst von (27 July 1877–09 February 1960), composer, concert pianist, teacher, and conductor, also known as Ernó and baptized Dohnányi Erno Jeno Frigyes, was born in Pozsony, Hungary-later known as Pressberg, then Bratislava, Slovakia. (The population of Pozsony was approximately half Hungarian and half German, so Dohnányi was comfortable with the language and heritage of both.) He was the son of Frederick von Dohnányi (Dohnányi Frigyes), professor of mathematics and physics at the Royal Catholic Chief Gymnasium (Királyi Katolikus Fögimnásium) and an accomplished cellist and composer. Dohnányi's mother, Ottilia Szlabey, was tiny; she was sometimes referred to as fiercely determined and willing to sacrifice her comfort for others. Dohnányi embodied these characteristics as an adult helping family and friends survive the vicissitudes of wartime Europe. His sister, Mitzi, was a year younger. A brother died in infancy. When traveling outside of Hungary, he called himself Ernst von Dohnányi....

Article

Humiston, William Henry (27 April 1869–05 December 1923), organist, conductor, and composer, was born in Marietta, Ohio, the son of Henry Humiston and Margaret Voris. As a child, Humiston moved to Chicago with his family, where he completed high school in 1886. He continued his education at Lake Forest College, graduating in 1891 with a B.A. During these years and even later, he studied piano and harmony with ...

Article

Hupfeld, Charles Frederick (1788–15 July 1864), violinist, conductor, and composer, was born in Germany. The identities of his parents are not known. He was probably related to Bernhard Hupfeld, a composer and violinist trained in Italy, who served as director of music at the University of Marburg. Charles Hupfeld was closely associated with Henry Hupfeld, Bernhard’s eldest son, who was also a violinist. Charles Hupfeld arrived in Philadelphia as an excellent violinist and probably studied the violin in Germany, but no details of his life there are known....

Article

Jenkins, Edmund Thornton (09 April 1894–12 September 1926), clarinetist, composer, and conductor, was born in Charleston, South Carolina, the son of Daniel Jenkins, a former slave, minister, and founder-director of the Jenkins Orphanage Band, and Lena James. Jenkins attended the Avery Institute in Charleston. As a child, he learned to play violin, clarinet, and piano. His first music teachers were his father and other instructors at the orphanage, which was founded in December 1891 and formally incorporated as the Orphan Aid Society in July 1892. By the time he was fourteen years old, Jenkins had learned to play all the instruments of his father’s brass band. In 1908 he entered Atlanta Baptist College (now Morehouse College) where he studied violin with Kemper Harreld. Jenkins participated in the symphony orchestra, glee club, and other musical activities. During vacations he performed, directed, and toured with the orphanage band. Jenkins left college during the summer of 1914 to travel with the band to London for the Anglo-American Exposition, organized by the Hungarian ...

Image

Ethel Leginska Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-97196).

Article

Leginska, Ethel (13 April 1886–26 February 1970), concert pianist, conductor, and composer, was born Ethel Liggins in Hull, Yorkshire, England, the daughter of Thomas Liggins and Annie Peck. A child prodigy, Leginska gave her first public piano recital at the age of seven. In 1900 she won a scholarship to study the piano at the Hoch Conservatory in Frankfurt under James Kwast and theory under Bernhard Sekles and Ivan Knorr. In 1904 she began a three-year period of study with Theodor Leschetizky in Vienna and in Berlin. In 1907, the year of her London debut, she married Roy Emerson Whittern, an American who was studying composition; he later changed his name to Emerson Whithorne....

Article

Mitropoulos, Dimitri (01 March 1896–02 November 1960), conductor, pianist, and composer, was born in Athens, Greece, the son of Jean Mitropoulos, a leather merchant, and Angeliki Anagnostopoulos. He was musically precocious and began to play the piano at the age of seven. He studied at the Athens Conservatory of Music, where Ludwig Wassenhoven taught him piano and Armand Marsick taught him composition. After fighting on the Bulgarian front during World War I, Mitropoulos returned to the conservatory and graduated in piano in 1918 and in composition in 1920. During these early years Mitropoulos composed several songs to Greek and French texts, a symphonic poem entitled ...

Article

Pryor, Arthur Willard (22 September 1870–18 June 1942), virtuoso trombonist, conductor, and composer, was born in St. Joseph, Missouri, the son of Samuel Daniel Pryor, a bandleader, and Mary “Mollie” A. Coker, a pianist. Beginning his musical study as early as age six, Pryor studied piano, violin, string bass, cornet, alto horn, and valve trombone. By age eleven he was quite accomplished on the latter instrument, playing solos with his father’s band. At fifteen he taught himself to play the slide trombone utilizing only two positions instead of the usual seven. Later in his career, to his advantage, he used this technique of playing some notes in “false” or “wrong” positions, developing a facility that is often considered the greatest of all time; he also developed a technique for playing chords (multiphonics)....

Image

Sergei Rachmaninoff Photograph by Arnold Genthe, 1918. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-G432-2683).

Article

Rachmaninoff, Sergei (02 April 1873–28 March 1943), composer, pianist, and conductor, was born Sergei Vasilyevich Rachmaninoff on his parents’ estate at Oneg, near Novgorod, Russia, the son of Vasily Arkadyevich Rachmaninoff, a wealthy but dissolute army officer, and Lubov Petrovna Butokova. As a result of Vasily Rachmaninoff’s extravagant ways, the family was forced to liquidate its assets, which included a number of country estates, and in 1882 they moved to a small flat in Saint Petersburg....

Article

Rapee, Erno (04 June 1891–26 June 1945), composer, conductor, and pianist, was born in Budapest, Hungary. A piano virtuoso, he studied composition and piano at the Budapest Royal Conservatory, graduating at the age of eighteen. A conducting student of Ernst Schuch, the general musical director of the Dresden Royal Opera House, Rapee held conductor and assistant conductor posts with various European theaters. Following a concert tour of South America and Mexico, he came to New York City in 1912. Arriving literally without funds, Rapee found employment as a musician at New York’s Cafe Monopole for $25 a week. He also worked briefly as an accompanist for Harry Lauder, the popular Scottish singer and comedian. In 1913 he was engaged as musical director for New York City’s Hungarian Opera Company. The following year he made his American vaudeville debut, playing classical numbers and patriotic medleys on the piano....

Article

Schelling, Ernest Henry (26 July 1876–08 December 1939), pianist, composer, and conductor, was born in Belvidere, New Jersey, the son of Felix Emmanuel Schelling, a physician and musician from St. Gall, Switzerland, and the English-born Rose White Wilkes of Philadelphia. Schelling’s early musical studies were under the strict training of his gifted father. Ernest’s public debut at age four at the Philadelphia Academy of Music was hailed by a review in the ...

Article

Sobolewski, Edward (01 October 1804–17 May 1872), conductor, composer, and violinist, was born Johann Friedrich Eduard Sobolewski in Königsberg, East Prussia (now Kaliningrad, Russia), the son of Johann Sobolewski, an oboe player and soldier, and Amalia Louisa Corittkin. His early education included study with Königsberg musicians such as Friedrich Dorn, organist Wilhelm Jensen, composer and conductor Friedrich Selter, and August Gotthold, the director of the Frederick College. At age sixteen he was first violinist in Zander’s Quartet, a group established in 1791. He studied composition with Carl Friederich Zelter in Berlin and Carl Maria von Weber in Dresden (1821–1824). In 1830 he became director of music at the theater in Königsberg and became the cantor of the Altstädtische Kirche in 1835. When the Philharmonische Gesellschaft was founded in 1838, Sobolewski was selected as the conductor. He also conducted the chorus of the Academy of Music (from 1843). He served as music critic of the ...

Article

Stoessel, Albert Frederic (11 October 1894–12 May 1943), conductor, violinist, and composer, was born in St. Louis, Missouri, the son of Albert John Stoessel, a theater musician, and Alfreda Wiedmann. Studying violin first with his father and then with Hugo Olk, a former student of Joseph Joachim in Berlin and concertmaster of the St. Louis Orchestra, the musical prodigy’s public education ended with the eighth grade. A precocious talent sharpened by family nurturing and community support, fifteen-year-old Albert entered the Berlin Hochschule für Musik, studying violin with Emanuel Wirth and Willy Hess (boy wonder soloist with ...

Article

Walter, Bruno (15 September 1876–17 February 1962), conductor, pianist, and composer, was born Bruno Walter Schlesinger in Berlin, Germany, the son of Joseph Schlesinger, a bookkeeper, and Johanna Fernbach. His childhood was spent in modest, lower-middle-class surroundings in the northeastern part of Berlin, where he was influenced by the literary and musical interests of his parents. He began musical studies with his mother, a student at the Stern Conservatory, and when he was only eight years old he was admitted as a student at Stern. At age nine he performed a piano solo in a public recital, after which he received free tuition at the conservatory. His progress as a pianist was rapid, as evidenced by his appearance as soloist in the Moscheles E-flat major concerto with the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra in 1889....

Article

Weston, Paul (12 March 1912–20 September 1996), musician, was born Paul Wetstein in Springfield, Massachusetts, the son of Paul Richard Wetstein, a teacher at Miss Hill's School for Girls, and Anna Grady Wetstein. Educated through high school in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, he was Phi Beta Kappa at Dartmouth College, majoring in economics and leading a jazz band, and graduating cum laude in 1933....

Image

Paul Weston. Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

Article

Willson, Meredith (18 May 1902–15 June 1984), lyricist/composer, conductor, and flutist, was born Robert Reiniger Meredith Willson in Mason City, Iowa, the son of John D. Willson, a lawyer and businessman, and Rosalie Reiniger, a teacher. Both of Willson’s grandfathers were considered early settlers by more recent immigrants, adding to the family’s local prominence. Meredith appeared in his mother’s Sunday school musicals as early as the age of four and at twelve sang a solo as Don (“a shepherd”) in the local production of his sister Dixie’s musical, ...