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Lyman, Charles Parker (01 September 1846–01 February 1918), educator and veterinarian, was born in New York City, the son of Jabez Whiting Lyman, a partner in a Boston dry goods store, and Mary Ainsworth Parker. Lyman married Lucy E. Pope in 1868; they had a son and a daughter. He graduated from the Veterinary College (Edinburgh, Scotland) in 1874 and then returned to the United States to establish a practice in Springfield, Massachusetts. Between 1877 and 1879 he taught veterinary courses at the Massachusetts Agriculture College (now the University of Massachusetts, Amherst). During these same two years he also served as president of the U.S. Veterinary Medical Association. In 1880, for U.S. commissioner of agriculture William G. Le Duc, he undertook an extensive study of contagious bovine pleuro-pneumonia, one of several animal diseases (epizootics) threatening the beef and dairy industries. This work took him to most East Coast stockyards and seaports. In addition he traveled to Great Britain in order to persuade officials there to lift their embargo on imported cattle from the United States. Although unsuccessful in this part of his task, his four reports on this economically devastating disease were widely disseminated and served to convince the public, livestock owners, and politicians that bovine pleuro-pneumonia was, indeed, contagious. An unusual feature of Lyman’s published report was a thematic map showing that the epizootic appeared only in contiguous counties on the Atlantic seaboard. This added visual proof, or so Lyman thought, that the country was, indeed, facing a contagious disease. In 1879 and 1880 Lyman traveled to Great Britain and—by examination—became a member (1879) and then a fellow (1880) of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (London)....

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Pearson, Leonard (17 August 1868–20 September 1909), veterinary educator, bacteriologist, and sanitarian, was born in Evansville, Indiana, the son of Leonard Pearson, an assistant superintendent of the Evansville and Crawfordsville Railroad, and Lucy Small Jones. He studied veterinary medicine at Cornell University with renowned veterinarian ...

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Williams, Walter Long (26 February 1856–23 October 1945), veterinarian, scientist, and educator, was born on a farm near Argenta, Illinois, the son of Jackson Williams and Lavina Long, farmers. He attended Illinois Industrial University (now the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) from January 1875 until June 1877. Studying in the School of Agriculture, he took veterinary courses for farmers taught by Frederick W. Prentice, and therein found his life’s work. Leaving the university because he could no longer afford it, he worked on his father’s farm until the fall of 1878, when he left to study at the Montreal Veterinary College (MVC). There he encountered Duncan McEachran, a pioneering veterinary educator, and ...