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Francis, Thomas, Jr. (15 July 1900–01 October 1969), physician, virologist, and epidemiologist, was born in Gas City, Indiana, the son of Thomas Francis, a Methodist lay preacher and steelworker, and Elizabeth Ann Cadogan, a Salvation Army worker. He graduated from Allegheny College in 1921 and from Yale University School of Medicine in 1925. He received his residence training under Francis G. Blake at the New Haven Hospital....

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Paul, John Rodman (18 April 1893–06 May 1971), clinical epidemiologist and virologist, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Henry Neill Paul, a lawyer, and Margaret Crosby Butler. In 1911 Paul entered Princeton; after graduating in 1915, he went to Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. After the United States became involved in World War I, he joined the Johns Hopkins Hospital unit as an enlisted man, setting up Base Hospital No. 18 in Bazoille sur Meuse, France, in June 1917. After his return to Baltimore in 1918, the great influenza epidemic reached the United States, and Paul observed the great risks of cross-infection among hospitalized patients. After receiving his M.D. in 1919, he spent a brief period as an assistant pathologist at Johns Hopkins. From 1920 to 1922 he was an intern at the Pennsylvania Hospital in Philadelphia....

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South, Lillian Herreld (31 January 1879–14 September 1966), physician, epidemiologist, and bacteriologist, was born near Bowling Green, Kentucky, the daughter of J. F. South, a physician, and Martha Bell Moore. She graduated from E. B. Potter College in Bowling Green in 1897. South studied at the Paterson (N.J.) General Hospital School of Nursing, earning an R.N. degree in 1899. She then enrolled at the Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, graduating with an M.D. in 1904. From 1906 to 1910 she practiced medicine in Bowling Green with partners ...