1-14 of 14 results  for:

  • historian (general) x
Clear all

Article

Bancroft, Frederic A. (30 October 1860–22 February 1945), historian, librarian, and philanthropist, was born Frederic Austin Bancroft in Galesburg, Illinois, the son of Addison Newton Bancroft, a businessman, and Catherine Blair. Bancroft, raised in abolitionist surroundings, attended school at Knox Academy, Knox College (1878–1881), transferred to Amherst College in 1881, and graduated a year later. He entered Columbia University’s School of Political Science in 1882 to study southern history with ...

Article

Burr, George Lincoln (30 January 1857–27 June 1938), librarian, historian, and educator, was born in Oramel, New York, the son of William Josiah Burr, a physician, and Jane Lincoln. Educated in the public schools of Newark Valley and the Cortland Academy, Burr worked as a printer to pay for his schooling. In 1877 he entered Cornell University, where he received his A.B. four years later. Upon graduation, thanks to the friendship shown by Cornell president ...

Article

Dexter, Franklin Bowditch (11 September 1842–13 August 1920), educator, librarian, and historian, was born in Fairhaven, Massachusetts, the son of Rodolphus Williams Dexter, a businessman, and Mary Hathaway Taber. He attended the Williston Seminary in preparation for Yale College, in New Haven, Connecticut, from which he graduated with an A.B. in 1861. He received an A.M. in 1864 and a Litt.D. in 1902. He taught Greek at the Collegiate and Commercial Institute in New Haven from 1861 to 1863 before returning to work at Yale....

Article

Farrand, Max (29 March 1869–17 June 1945), historian and library director, was born in Newark, New Jersey, the son of Samuel Ashbel Farrand, the headmaster of the Newark Academy, and Louise Wilson. After graduating from his father’s academy in 1885, Farrand entered Princeton University, from which he earned an A.B. in 1892. Although he majored in biology, he was friendly with various undergraduates interested in literature. Having taken a stimulating course in history under ...

Article

Galbreath, Charles Burleigh (25 February 1858–23 February 1934), librarian, historian, and teacher, was born on a farm in Columbiana County, Ohio, near the town of Leetonia, the son of Edward Paxson Galbreath and Jane Minerva Shaw. His parents were Quakers of Scotch-Irish heritage who moved to Ohio from North Carolina due to their antislavery stand. They instilled in their son an appreciation and interest in the antislavery cause that probably influenced his research on ...

Article

Golder, Frank Alfred (11 August 1877–07 January 1929), historian and library curator, was born near Odessa, Russia, the son of Minnie (maiden name not known) and Joseph Golder, a Talmudic scholar. To escape the virulent anti-Semitic pogroms of the early 1880s, the Golder family in about 1885 emigrated to the United States. They first settled in Bridgeton, New Jersey, where Joseph Golder took whatever odd jobs were available. A Baptist minister named Richard Minch found Frank Golder, whom he remembered as “a little Jew peddlar,” on the streets and provided money for him to go to school. After a few years the Golders moved to Vineland, New Jersey, where they tried farming. In 1893 Golder enrolled in a preparatory school in Georgetown, Kentucky, perhaps aided financially by Reverend Minch. He graduated from it in 1896, then studied at Bucknell University on a two-year program, finally receiving a teacher’s certificate in 1898. In 1899 he signed an American government contract, and from 1900 to 1902 he taught English to children on Unga Island, one of the Aleutian islands. At about this time Golder became a Unitarian....

Article

Larned, Josephus Nelson (11 May 1836–15 August 1913), librarian and social historian, was born in Chatham, Canada West (now Ontario, Canada), the son of Henry Sherwood Larned, a contractor, and Mary Ann Nelson. At the age of twelve Larned and his family moved to Buffalo, New York, where he spent much of the rest of his life. Larned’s formal education ended when he was sixteen, and in later years he chided the Buffalo community for not encouraging its young men to strive for higher education....

Article

Marx, Alexander (29 January 1878–26 December 1953), historian and librarian, was born in Elberfeld, Germany, the son of George Marx, a merchant and banker, and Gertrude Simon. The family moved to Königsberg when Alexander was seven, and he received an intensive secular and Jewish religious education. After graduating from the Gymnasium, he spent a year in Halberstadt engaged in rabbinic studies under the tutelage of the renowned Rabbi Joseph Nobel. Between 1896 and 1903 Marx studied at the universities of Berlin and Königsberg and at the Orthodox Rabbinical Seminary in Berlin. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Königsberg in 1903....

Article

Schomburg, Arthur Alfonso (24 January 1874–10 June 1938), historian, bibliophile, and curator, was born Arturo Alfonso Schomburg in San Juan, Puerto Rico, the son of Mary Joseph, an unwed midwife or laundress who had been born free in 1837 on St. Croix, Virgin Islands. Some sources claim that his father was Carlos Federico Schomburg, a German-born émigré merchant, but in a reply to a questionnaire from ...

Article

Sibley, John Langdon (29 December 1804–09 December 1885), librarian and historian, was born in Union, Maine, the son of Jonathan Sibley, a physician, and Persis Morse. His father’s medical practice was more “extensive than gainful.” Sibley was educated at home, except for two years (1819–1821) at Phillips Exeter Academy, where he was provided free tuition and living expenses. He graduated from Harvard College in the class of 1825, having supported himself in college through a series of jobs, including work in the library. Following graduation he was appointed assistant librarian to librarian ...

Article

Thwaites, Reuben Gold (15 May 1853–22 October 1913), historian, editor, and librarian, was born in Dorchester, Massachusetts, the son of William George Thwaites and Sarah Bibbs, farmers. Thwaites’s family had emigrated from Yorkshire, England, three years before his birth. He attended school in Dorchester and in 1866 moved with his parents to Oshkosh, Wisconsin, where he helped them farm, taught school, and read the equivalent of a program of college courses. He became a reporter on the ...

Article

Whitehill, Walter Muir, Jr. (28 September 1905–05 March 1978), librarian and historian, was born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the son of Walter Muir Whitehill, an Episcopal priest, and Florence Marion Williams. Following graduation from Harvard College in 1926, Whitehill remained as a tutor in Harvard’s Department of Fine Arts for two academic years. Spending summers in Spain, he began research on Spanish Romanesque architecture, which he continued during 1928–1929. Returning to Harvard in 1929, he earned an A.M. in fine arts, and in 1930 he married Jane Revere Coolidge; they had two children....

Article

Winsor, Justin (02 January 1831–22 October 1897), librarian and historian, was born in Boston, the son of Nathaniel Winsor, Jr., a prosperous merchant and ship broker, and Ann Thomas Howland. After attending a boarding school in Sandwich, Massachusetts, Winsor enrolled at the Boston Latin Grammar School. While there, he visited the New-England Historic Genealogical Society and became interested in studying the history of his father's ancestors, who had come from Duxbury, Massachusetts, and that of his mother's ancestors, one of whom had been a ...

Article

Wroth, Lawrence Counselman (14 January 1884–25 December 1970), book historian and librarian, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, the son of the Reverend Peregrine Wroth, an Episcopal clergyman active in diocesan affairs, and Mary Augusta Counselman. In 1902 Lawrence Wroth entered the Johns Hopkins University, where he took the historical-political course and graduated with an A.B. in 1905. He hoped to be a writer and unexpectedly found the way to his subject and his career in the fall of 1905. When the position of librarian of the Episcopal Diocese of Maryland suddenly became vacant, Wroth was appointed to it. The diocesan library had an important collection of source materials ranging from the colonial period to the nineteenth century, and as Wroth became familiar with it, he began to write articles on Maryland history for scholarly publications. In 1911 he published his first book, a life of Parson Weems ( ...