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Brawley, Edward McKnight (18 March 1851–13 January 1923), Baptist minister, educator, and editor, was born in Charleston, South Carolina, the son of free African-American parents, Ann L. (maiden name unknown) and James M. Brawley. Brawley’s parents took a keen interest in the education and professional development of their son, providing him private schooling in Charleston, sending him at the age of ten to Philadelphia to attend grammar school and the Institute for Colored Youth, and having him apprenticed to a shoemaker in Charleston from 1866 to 1869. He enrolled as the first theological student at Howard University for a few months in 1870; he transferred to Bucknell University in Pennsylvania in January 1871. The first African-American student at Bucknell, Brawley completed his education with the encouragement and financial support of a white couple named Griffith and his own work teaching vocal music and preaching during school vacations. The white Baptist church in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, with which he had affiliated, ordained him to the ministry the day after his graduation, 1 July 1875; he was examined by a board composed largely of professors and other learned individuals. In 1878 he received the A.M. from Bucknell and, in 1885, an honorary doctor of divinity degree from the State University in Louisville, Kentucky....

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Pendleton, James Madison (20 November 1811–04 March 1891), Baptist minister, professor, and journalist, was born in Spotsylvania County, Virginia, the son of John Pendleton and Frances J. Thompson, farmers. The year following Pendleton’s birth (he was named in honor of President Madison), the family relocated to a farm near Pembroke in Christian County, Kentucky, where he lived until he was twenty years old. In 1829, at age seventeen, he was baptized and joined Bethel Baptist Church, which licensed him to preach in 1831. He spent the next two years preaching at various churches in or around Christian County. Hopkinsville Baptist Church ordained him to Christian ministry in 1833, when he enrolled in the Christian County Seminary in Hopkinsville where he studied until 1836, obtaining an education in the Greek and Latin classics. During this period, he continued to preach locally. His education was superior to that of most Baptist ministers west of the Appalachian Mountains in the nineteenth century. In 1837 he accepted an invitation to become the pastor of the Baptist Church in Bowling Green, Kentucky, where he had a successful ministry for twenty years as the first Baptist pastor in western Kentucky to enter the ministry as a full-time profession. In 1838 he married Catherine Stockton Garnett; they had three daughters and two sons....