1-8 of 8 results  for:

  • air transport x
  • inventor (general) x
Clear all

Article

Colley, Russell (22 July 1897–04 February 1996), inventor, designer, and aeronautical engineer, was born Russell Sidney Colley in Stoneham, Mass., the son of Frank S. Colley, a druggist, and Florence Vesta Hopkins Colley. Russell spent several summers in high school serving as an apprentice electrician. After he revealed his desire to become a women's fashion designer, his art teacher directed him out of her freehand drawing class into what she considered more appropriate, a mechanical drawing class. He was accepted into Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston, Massachusetts, and in 1918 completed the two-year machine construction and tool design course....

Image

Glenn H. Curtiss. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-106325).

Article

Curtiss, Glenn Hammond (21 May 1878–23 July 1930), aeronautical inventor and manufacturer, was born in Hammondsport, New York, the son of Frank R. Curtiss, the owner of a harness shop, and Lua Andrews. After the death of his father in 1883, Curtiss was raised by his mother and his strong-willed grandmother Ruth Curtiss in the bucolic Finger Lake region of western New York. After graduating from the eighth grade in 1892, Curtiss secured a job stenciling numbers on the backing of photographic film for the Eastman Dry Plant and Film Company (later Eastman Kodak Company) of Rochester. The next year he purchased a bicycle and found employment as a messenger for Western Union....

Article

Link, Edwin Albert, Jr. (26 July 1904–07 September 1981), inventor and businessman, was born in Huntington, Indiana, the youngest son of Edwin Albert Link, Sr., and Katherine Martin. In 1910 the family moved to Binghamton, New York, when Link’s father purchased the bankrupt Binghamton Automatic Music Corporation. Renamed the Link Piano and Organ Company, the firm established a reputation for manufacturing theater organs, player pianos, and nickelodeons. Because he was less interested in academics than in tinkering with mechanical devices, Link’s educational record was erratic. He spent a brief time at the Rockford Training High School (Ill.), Los Angeles Polytechnic High School, Bellefonte Academy (Pa.), and Lindsley Institute (W.Va.). In 1922 he returned to Binghamton and entered Central High School. He also worked for his father’s company, where he rebuilt and repaired organs....

Article

Lockheed, Malcolm (1887–13 August 1958), aircraft engineer and inventor, was born Malcolm Loughead in Niles, California, the son of John Loughead, a hardware store owner, and Flora Haines, a fruit grower and writer. (He later started using a phonetic spelling of his Scottish name, which people had persisted in pronouncing “log-head” or “loaf-head.”) His mother, long separated from her husband, was a college graduate and a former schoolteacher who supported her family by growing and marketing fruit and writing feature articles for the ...

Article

See Wright, Wilbur

Image

Orville Wright and Wilbur Wright. Orville in the center, Wilbur in back, with Charles Rolls at the wheel of his Rolls-Royce and a chauffeur, at Shellbeach, England. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-92097).

Article

Wright, Wilbur (16 April 1867–30 May 1912), and Orville Wright (19 August 1871–30 January 1948), inventors of the airplane, were born, respectively, near Millville, Indiana, and in Dayton, Ohio, the sons of Milton Wright, a clergyman, and Susan Catherine Koerner. Their father, who rose from circuit preacher to bishop of the Church of the United Brethren in Christ, and their mother presided over a loving home where children were encouraged to think for themselves and support one another. “From the time we were little children,” Wilbur remarked just before his death, “my brother Orville and myself lived together, played together, worked together, and in fact, thought together… . nearly everything that was done in our lives has been the result of conversations, suggestions and discussions between us.”...