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Bryant, Louise Frances Stevens (19 September 1885–29 August 1959), social statistician and medical editor, was born in Paris, France, the daughter of Charles E. Stevens, a civil engineer, and Miriam Collins Nicholson. She spent her first three years touring Europe with her mother and sister while her father led government-sponsored prospecting operations in South America. In 1888 he died, leaving a sizable inheritance, and they settled in New York City. The inheritance dissipated in unfortunate investments, and in 1910 she moved with her family to Rahway, New Jersey. After attending Hunter College and the Normal College of the City of New York for a year, she matriculated in 1904 at Smith College, where she studied philosophy and zoology and received her B.A. in 1908. Later that year she married Arthur A. Bryant; they had no children....

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Olds, Leland (31 December 1890–03 August 1960), statistician, journalist, and government regulatory official, was born in Rochester, New York, the son of George Daniel Olds, a professor of mathematics at the University of Rochester, and Marion Elizabeth Leland. In 1891 his father became chair of the mathematics department at Amherst College and eventually president of the college in 1924. Inspired by conservationist ...

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Swank, James Moore (12 July 1832–21 June 1914), newspaper editor, statistician, and lobbyist, was born in Loyalhanna Township, Westmoreland County, Pennsylvania, the son of George W. Swank, a local businessman, and Nancy Moore. Swank spent 1849–1850 at Jefferson College, a preparatory school in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, after which he taught school, clerked in his father’s store, read law, and edited a Whig newspaper, the ...

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West, Benjamin ( March 1730–26 August 1813), astronomer and mathematician, was born in Rehoboth, Massachusetts, the son of John West, a farmer. His mother’s name is not known. Not long after his birth, the family moved to Bristol, Rhode Island, where West worked discontentedly on the family farm. West attended the town school for only three months and took a course of navigation offered by Captain Woodbury, who waived his fees for the poor farm boy. Otherwise, West was self-educated, borrowing books from local parsons’ libraries. In 1753 he married Elizabeth Smith; they had eight children. That same year West moved to Providence, Rhode Island, where he opened a private school, and then a dry-goods store that also sold books and was, by some accounts, the first bookstore in town. After nearly twenty years, his business failed and his effects were seized by creditors. His bankruptcy appears to have been a consequence of the depreciation of paper currency and the decline in transatlantic commerce just before the American Revolution. After his bankruptcy, some Bostonians offered to set him up in the book business again, but West doubted he could support his growing family this way. As a patriot, he chose to manufacture clothing for the American troops during the war. At war’s end, he reopened his school in Providence....