1-9 of 9 results  for:

  • Art and architecture x
Clear all

Article

Benson, Eugene (01 November 1839–28 February 1908), art critic, painter, and essayist, was born in Hyde Park, New York, the son of Benjamin Benson. His mother’s name is not known. He went to New York City in 1856 to study painting at the National Academy of Design; he also learned portraiture in the studio of J. H. Wright. Taking up residence at the New York University Building, he formed close friendships with several other artists who lived there, most notably ...

Article

Cox, Kenyon (27 October 1856–17 March 1919), artist and critic, was born in Warren, Ohio, the son of Jacob Dolson Cox, later a Union general in the Civil War, governor of Ohio, secretary of the interior for President Ulysses S. Grant, attorney, and legal educator, and Helen Finney, daughter of the famous evangelist ...

Article

de Kooning, Elaine (12 March 1918–01 February 1989), artist and critic, was born Elaine Marie Catherine Fried in Brooklyn, New York, the daughter of Charles Frank Fried, an accountant, and Mary Ellen O’Brien. She grew up in Brooklyn, and, encouraged by her mother, began to show a strong interest in art by the age of five. She attended Erasmus Hall High School, where she began her formal training in art. After a brief enrollment at Hunter College, Elaine Fried began to study at the Leonardo da Vinci Art School in Manhattan in 1937. A year later she switched to the American Artists School and, influenced by the political environment of the school, began to work in a social realist vein. Her artistic direction changed quickly, however, after she began private study with the Dutch-born painter ...

Article

Gallatin, Albert Eugene (23 July 1881–15 June 1952), art museum founder, critic, and painter, was born in Villanova, Pennsylvania, the son of Albert Horatio Gallatin, a professor of analytical chemistry at New York University, and Louisa Belford Ewing. He was the proud namesake of his great-grandfather, ...

Article

Miller, Charles Henry (20 March 1842–21 January 1922), doctor of medicine, artist, and writer, was born in New York City, the son of Jacob H. Miller, an architect, and Jayne M. Taylor. He attended Mount Washington Collegiate Institute to prepare for a career in law or medicine, although early on he had displayed an interest in painting and drawing. In 1860 Miller exhibited his first painting at the National Academy of Design, and the following year he sent two more paintings for exhibition. His father, unhappy with his son’s interest in art, urged him to enroll in the New York Homeopathic Medical Institute. Miller acquiesced to his father’s wishes and completed his medical studies in 1863, receiving his degree from ...

Article

Pach, Walter (11 July 1883–27 November 1958), artist and art critic, was born in New York City, the son of Gotthelf Pach, a photographer, and Frances Wise. The elder Pach was the official photographer for the Metropolitan Museum of Art and by bringing Walter to the museum while he worked, Gotthelf Pach introduced his son to art at an early age. Pach grew up in a comfortable, middle-class home with one brother, Alfred. He graduated with a bachelor of arts degree from the College of the City of New York in 1903. Thereafter he received artistic training in Manhattan under Leigh Hunt, ...

Article

Porter, Fairfield (10 June 1907–18 September 1975), painter and art critic, was born in Winnetka, Illinois, the son of James Porter and Ruth Furness. His father was an architect who built the family’s Greek revival home in suburban Chicago and their summer house on Great Spruce Head Island in Penobscot Bay off the coast of Maine. Porter attended and graduated from the Winnetka public schools. When he was fourteen he went to Europe with his father. At the National Gallery in London he was strongly impressed by the works of Italian Renaissance artists and the paintings of J. M. W. Turner. After a year at Milton Academy he entered Harvard University, where he studied art history and philosophy. During the summer before his senior year, Porter traveled and sketched in France and Germany and concluded his trip with a short visit to the Soviet Union. There he heard Leon Trotsky speak, visited the Shchukin Gallery of Modern Art in Moscow, and took careful visual and verbal note of Russian daily life. The trip was fundamental in shaping Porter’s leftist views, which matured during the Great Depression....

Article

Porter, James Amos (22 December 1905–28 February 1970), African-American painter, art historian, and writer, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, the son of John Porter, a Methodist minister, and Lydia Peck, a schoolteacher. The youngest of seven siblings, he attended the public schools in Baltimore and Washington, D.C., and graduated cum laude from Howard University in 1927 with a bachelor of science in art. That same year Howard appointed him instructor in art in the School of Applied Sciences. In December 1929 he married Dorothy Louise Burnett of Montclair, New Jersey; they had one daughter....

Article

Smithson, Robert Irving (02 January 1938–20 July 1973), artist and art theorist, was born in Passaic, New Jersey, the son of Irving Smithson, the vice president of a mortgage loan firm, and Susan Duke. Smithson grew up in Rutherford and Clifton, New Jersey. His pediatrician was the poet ...