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Cavanaugh, John Joseph (23 January 1899–28 December 1979), priest and educator, was born in Bennington Township, Shiawasee County, Michigan, the son of Michael Francis Cavanaugh and Mary Ann Keegan, farmers. His father died when John was five years old, and his mother was forced to sell their small farm and move with four young children to nearby Owosso, taking in boarders for a time to meet expenses. After completing parish grammar school, young John enrolled in an accelerated commercial course of typing, shorthand, and bookkeeping and, at thirteen, entered the work force, eventually serving as a business secretary....

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Corby, William (02 October 1833–28 December 1897), Roman Catholic priest and educator, was born in Detroit, Michigan, the son of Daniel Corby, a real estate dealer, and Elizabeth Stapleton. After working for four years in his father’s real estate firm, Corby entered the University of Notre Dame in 1853. He joined the Congregation of Holy Cross, a religious order, in 1854 and continued his studies at Notre Dame until 1860, when he was ordained a priest. Soon afterward, he was appointed director of the Manual Labor School at Notre Dame, Indiana, and served as pastor of a parish in South Bend, Indiana....

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Gasson, Thomas Ignatius (23 September 1859–27 February 1930), Roman Catholic priest and educator, was born in Sevenoaks, Kent, England, the son of Henry Gasson and Arabella Quinnell. The occupation of his parents is unknown, but his family was of the landed gentry. Gasson was tutored by the Reverend Allen T. Edwards and was also educated at St. Stephen’s School, Lambeth, London. Gasson emigrated to the United States in 1872, having made plans to live with an older brother in Philadelphia. There he received private tutoring and was befriended by two Catholic women, Catherine Doyle and Anne McGarvey. The extent of their influence became evident in October 1874, when Gasson forsook his father’s Huguenot heritage and was received into the Catholic faith by the Reverend Charles Cicaterri, S.J., at the Chapel of the Holy Family (now the Jesuit Church of the Gesu) in Philadelphia. Gasson took his new faith one step further by joining the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) religious order on 17 November 1875, thereby beginning his novitiate....

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Healy, Patrick Francis (02 February 1834–10 January 1910), Jesuit priest and university president, was born in Jones County, Georgia, the son of Michael Morris Healy, an Irish-American planter, and Mary Eliza (maiden name uncertain, but possibly Clark), a mulatto slave. The senior Healy deserted from the British army in Canada during the War of 1812 and by 1818 had made his way to rural Georgia where he settled, speculated in land, and acquired a sizable plantation and numerous slaves. He fathered ten children by an African-American woman he had purchased. Healy acknowledged Mary Eliza as “my trusty woman” in his will, which provided that she be paid an annuity, transported to a free state, and “not bartered or sold or disposed of in any way” should he predecease her. Healy also acknowledged his children by Mary Eliza, although by state law they were slaves he owned, and he arranged for them to leave Georgia and move to the North, where they would become free....

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Raynor, John Patrick (01 October 1923–14 November 1997), educator, university president, and clergyman, was born in Omaha, Nebraska, one of ten children of Walter V. Raynor, an investment banker and bond salesman, and Mary Clare (May) Raynor. From 1938 to 1941 John attended the Jesuit high school Creighton Prep in Omaha. He joined the Society of Jesus on 17 August 1941 at St. Stanislaus Seminary in Florissant, Missouri....