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Aaron Burr. Engraving on paper, c. 1793 - 1814, by Charles Balthazar Julien Févret de Saint-Mémin. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon.

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Burr, Aaron (06 February 1756–14 September 1836), revolutionary soldier, U.S. senator, and vice president of the United States, was born in Newark, New Jersey, the son of Aaron Burr, a theologian and the second president of the College of New Jersey (later Princeton University), and ...

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Howard, John Eager (04 June 1752–12 October 1827), revolutionary soldier, governor of Maryland, and U.S. senator, was born at “The Forrest,” in Baltimore County, Maryland, the son of Cornelius Howard and Ruth Eager. His English ancestor, Joshua Howard, had emigrated to Maryland after serving in the army of James II during Monmouth’s Rebellion in 1685 and had received a grant of land in Baltimore County. Because subsequent generations had added to this plantation, Cornelius could provide John with a good education under private tutors. John served in Maryland’s militia for the duration of the War of Independence, first as captain in the “Flying Camp” of 1776, as major of the Fourth Regiment from late February 1777 onward, then as lieutenant colonel of the Fifth Regiment after early March 1778, until transfer to the Second Regiment in October 1779. He served in the battles of White Plains, Germantown, and Monmouth in the North and Camden, Guilford Court House, Hobkirk’s Hill, Cowpens, and Eutaw Springs in the South, where he was severely wounded on 8 September 1781 and was forced to resign his commission and return home. Singled out for a heroic charge at Cowpens, Congress awarded him a silver medal, which he wears in a portrait by ...

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North, William (1755–03 January 1836), army officer and U.S. senator, was born at Fort Frederic, Pemaquid, Maine, the son of Captain John North, a surveyor, militia officer, and local judge, and Elizabeth Pitson. After his father’s death in 1763, North moved with his mother to Boston. He attended Boston Latin School, then took a position in a merchant’s office, where he remained until the British closed the port of Boston in the fall of 1774. In May 1776 North was commissioned a second lieutenant in Colonel ...

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Pickering, Timothy (17 July 1745–29 January 1829), revolutionary war officer, cabinet officer, congressman, and senator, was born in Salem, Massachusetts, the son of Timothy Pickering, Sr., a lay churchman and farmer, and Mary Wingate. Young Timothy Pickering graduated from Harvard in 1763 and returned home to Salem, where he took a position as assistant to the register of deeds, John Higginson, studied law, and, as a Loyalist, plunged into the political debate that preceded the War for Independence. In 1766 Governor ...

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Smith, Samuel (27 July 1752–22 April 1839), soldier and politician, was born in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, the son of John Smith, a successful merchant, and Mary Buchanan. The family relocated to Baltimore in 1760, and their personal wealth enabled Smith to attend private academies in Elkton, Maryland, and Newark, Delaware. Intent upon a commercial career, the young man was apprenticed in his father’s firm both in America and England, and he spent several years traveling abroad....

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Sumter, Thomas (14 August 1734–01 June 1832), revolutionary war general, congressman, and senator, was born in Louisa County, Virginia, the son of William Sumter, a farmer and miller said to have been an indentured servant, and Patience (maiden name unknown). According to family tradition, both parents emigrated from England. Nothing is known of Sumter’s youth, and he had only a limited education....