1-7 of 7 results  for:

  • territorial governor x
Clear all

Article

Blount, William (26 March 1749–21 March 1800), territorial governor and U.S. senator, was born in Bertie County, North Carolina, the son of Jacob Blount, a landowner, and Barbara Gray. While probably not formally schooled, he displayed a keen interest in the promotion of education throughout his career. Blount married Mary Grainger (known as “Molsey”) in 1778; they had eight children....

Article

Branch, John, Jr. (04 November 1782–04 January 1863), governor of North Carolina and Florida Territory, U.S. senator, and secretary of the navy, was born in the borough of Halifax, North Carolina, the son of prominent and wealthy parents, John Branch, Sr., and Rebecca Bradford. The senior Branch was a large landowner and revolutionary patriot who, as high sheriff, gained a reputation for identifying Tories. He represented Halifax County in four sessions of the House of Commons in the 1780s. The well-born Bradford was a daughter of Colonel John Bradford (d. 1787). Young Branch assumed the patrician inclinations of his parents. After receiving an A.B. from the University of North Carolina in 1801, he read law under the supervision of Judge ...

Article

Dodge, Henry (12 October 1782–19 June 1867), soldier, governor of Wisconsin Territory, and U.S. senator, was born at Post Vincennes (now Vincennes), Indiana, the son of Israel Dodge, a farmer and businessman, and Nancy Ann Hunter. His father moved the family to Kentucky and then to Ste. Genevieve on the Missouri frontier in 1796. By the time Henry was born his father had become a wealthy landowner. Henry had little formal education, but worked on his father’s farms and in his mills, distilleries, and mines. In 1800 Henry Dodge married Christina McDonald; they had thirteen children, but only nine survived infancy. He succeeded his father as sheriff of the Ste. Genevieve district in 1805....

Article

Edwards, Ninian (17 March 1775–20 July 1833), U.S. senator and governor of Illinois, was born on the family farm, “Mount Pleasant,” in Montgomery County, Maryland, the son of Benjamin Edwards, a farmer, merchant, and prominent politician, and Margaret Beall. As a boy, Ninian received instruction from private tutors in preparation for formal schooling at Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. Upon graduation in 1792 he took up law and, after moving with his parents in 1795 to Bardstown, Kentucky, was elected to the Kentucky legislature at age twenty. He also won election as a presidential elector on the Jefferson/Clinton ticket in 1804....

Article

Nye, James Warren (10 June 1814–25 December 1876), governor of Nevada Territory and U.S. senator, was born at De Ruyter, New York, the son of James Nye and Thankful Crocker. His father’s occupation is unknown. Although his family had very limited financial resources, James received a secondary education at Homer Academy and studied law in Hamilton, New York. He married Elsie Benson in Fabius, New York, and they had two children....

Image

Robert J. Walker. Daguerreotype from the studio of Mathew B. Brady. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-109886).

Article

Walker, Robert John (19 July 1801–11 November 1869), U.S. senator, cabinet officer, and governor of Kansas Territory, sometimes known as Robert James Walker, was born in Northumberland, Pennsylvania, the son of Jonathan Hoge Walker, a lawyer and judge, and Lucretia Duncan. Robert entered the University of Pennsylvania, finishing a two-year course magna cum laude in 1819. He read law with his father for two years, and he earned a master’s degree from the University of Pennsylvania in 1822. Returning to Pittsburgh, Robert, to his conservative father’s surprise, joined the new Democratic party and threw his abundant energy into ...