1-10 of 10 results  for:

  • US government (federal) x
  • politicians in American or USA x
  • political figure x
Clear all

Image

Blanche Kelso Bruce. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZC4-2781).

Article

Bruce, Blanche Kelso (01 March 1841–17 March 1898), black political leader and U.S. senator during the Reconstruction era, was born in Farmville, Virginia, the son of Polly (surname unknown), a slave. The identity of his father is unknown, but he took the surname of the man who owned his mother before he was born. His childhood as a slave on a small plantation, first in Virginia, then briefly in Mississippi, and finally in Missouri did not significantly differ, as he later recalled, from that of the sons of whites. This relatively benign experience in slavery perhaps owed a great deal to the fact that he was a light-skinned mulatto and the favorite of a benevolent master and mistress. He shared a tutor with his master’s son and thus obtained the education that prepared him for later success. During the Civil War, despite the benevolence of his owner, he fled to freedom in Kansas, but after slavery was abolished he returned to Missouri where he reportedly established the first school in the state for blacks, at Hannibal....

Article

Cameron, Don (14 May 1833–30 August 1918), U.S. senator and political boss, was born James Donald Cameron in Middletown, Pennsylvania, the son of Simon Cameron, a politician and businessman, and Margaret Brua. After graduating from Princeton in 1852, Cameron worked as a clerk in the Bank of Middletown, established by his father, soon rising to the post of cashier and then president. As a result of his father’s mounting political ambitions, Don Cameron also took charge of the Northern Central Railroad, the so-called Cameron Road, serving as president of the company from 1863 until its absorption by the Pennsylvania Railroad in 1874....

Article

Catron, Thomas Benton (06 October 1840–15 May 1921), U.S. senator and New Mexico territorial politician, was born near Lexington, Missouri, the son of John Catron and Mary Fletcher, farmers. Thomas Catron graduated from the University of Missouri in July 1860 and had just begun to read law when the Civil War broke out. Two months after Fort Sumter, he joined a Confederate infantry brigade that experienced frequent action throughout the war, including participation in the battle of Vicksburg....

Article

Chipman, Nathaniel (15 November 1752–15 February 1843), jurist, U.S. senator, and conservative political leader, was born in Salisbury, Connecticut, the son of Samuel Chipman, a blacksmith and farmer, and Hannah Austin. Chipman entered Yale University in 1773. He joined the Continental army as an ensign during his senior year, in spring 1777, receiving his degree in absentia. Chipman was promoted to lieutenant during the winter at Valley Forge and was present at the battle of Monmouth in June 1778. In October Chipman resigned his commission to study law, complaining that an officer’s salary was insufficient to “support the character of a gentleman” (Chipman, p. 32). One of the first graduates of ...

Image

Sam Houston. Daguerreotype from the studio of Mathew B. Brady. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-110029).

Article

Houston, Sam (02 March 1793–26 July 1863), president of the Republic of Texas and U.S. senator, was born Samuel Houston in Rockbridge County, Virginia, the son of Samuel Houston and Elizabeth Paxton, well-to-do planters of Scotch-Irish descent. Houston’s father died in 1806, and he moved with his mother and eight siblings to Blount County, Tennessee, in 1807....

Article

Ross, Edmund Gibson (07 December 1826–08 May 1907), journalist, U.S. senator, and politician, was born in Ashland, Ohio, the son of Sylvester F. Ross and Cynthia Rice, farmers. Apprenticed as a printer at the age of ten, he moved about as a journeyman printer, living at Sandusky, Ohio, Janesville, Wisconsin, and Milwaukee, where he worked as a job printer, first at the ...

Article

Russell, Richard Brevard, Jr. (02 November 1897–21 January 1971), senator and political leader, was born in Winder, Georgia, the son of Richard Brevard Russell, a lawyer and judge, and Blandina Dillard. Russell was educated at Gordon Military Institute and at the University of Georgia, where he received a law degree in 1918. After serving only about two months in the navy at the end of World War I in late 1918, he returned to practice law with his father in Winder....

Article

Worthington, Thomas (16 July 1773–20 June 1827), entrepreneur, politician, and U.S. senator, was born near Charlestown, Berkeley County, Virginia (now Jefferson County, W.Va.), the son of Robert Worthington, a prominent planter, and Margaret Matthews, from Frederickton, Maryland, who was of Irish background. Orphaned by the age of seven, he received little formal education and in May 1791 went to sea for two years. On his return he farmed the Berkeley County estate, took up surveying, and bought up Virginia military land warrants that he located near Chillicothe in the Northwest Territory. In December 1796 he married Eleanor Van Swearingen of Shepherdstown, Virginia, herself an orphan with a rich property. The couple had ten children. In spring 1798 Worthington freed his slaves and moved his family to Chillicothe; they were joined by his brother-in-law and lifelong political ally, ...