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Moore, Alfred (21 May 1755–15 October 1810), Revolutionary officer, attorney general of North Carolina, and associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, was born in New Hanover County, North Carolina, the son of Maurice Moore, a judge, and Anne Grange Moore. In 1764 Judge Maurice Moore, who was among the principal leaders of the Cape Fear River country, sent his son to Boston for his education. Prior to the outbreak of the Revolution, Alfred returned home and read law with his father. He won his license to practice law in April 1775 and on 1 September married Susanna Elizabeth Eagles of Brunswick County; they had two children....

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Stockton, John Potter (02 August 1826–22 January 1900), lawyer, senator, and New Jersey attorney general, was born in Princeton, New Jersey, the son of Robert Field Stockton, a naval officer, and Harriet Maria Potter. Like the Adamses of Massachusetts and the Jays of New York, the Stocktons of New Jersey were prominent in public affairs for over two centuries. Stockton graduated from the College of New Jersey (later Princeton University) in 1843. He read law in the office of his cousin Richard Stockton Field and was admitted to the bar in 1850. Stockton then practiced law in Princeton and Trenton. He married Sarah Marks, with whom he had three children....

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Tucker, John Randolph (24 December 1823–13 February 1897), attorney general of Virginia, congressman, and legal educator and scholar, was born in Winchester, Virginia, the son of Henry St. George Tucker, the president of the Virginia Court of Appeals, and Anne Evelina Hunter. Tucker spent part of his youth at the Tucker home, “Woodbury,” in Jefferson County and received his early education at a private school in Winchester. He later attended the Richmond Academy and, from 1839 to 1844, the University of Virginia, where his father taught law. In addition to law, Tucker studied moral and political philosophy, mathematics, and physical science. In 1845 he began practicing law in Winchester and soon rose to legal and political prominence. In 1848 he married Laura Holmes Powell; they had seven children. In 1852 and 1856 he was a presidential elector on the Democratic ticket, and in May 1857 he was elected attorney general of Virginia. He was twice reelected, in 1859 and 1863, and served until 1865....

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Earl Warren Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-92346).

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Warren, Earl (19 March 1891–09 July 1974), chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, governor of California, and attorney general of California, was born in Los Angeles, California, the son of Erik Methias “Matt” Warren, a railroad repairman, and Christine “Crystal” Hernlund. Both of Warren’s parents came to the United States as young children, his father from Norway and his mother from Sweden. They were married in Minneapolis but moved to California in the 1880s. After the 1894 Pullman strike at the Southern Pacific Railroad in Los Angeles Matt Warren was blacklisted, but he later found employment as a repairman at the new Southern Pacific facilities in Sumner, California, a town later annexed by nearby Bakersfield....