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Georgia Neese Clark. Courtesy of the Library of Congress.

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Clark, Georgia Neese (27 January 1898–26 October 1995), U.S. treasurer, was born Georgia Neese in Richland, Kansas, the daughter of Albert Neese, a farmer and businessman, and Ellen O'Sullivan Neese. Her father, a self-made man, had prospered in the years before her birth and become the town's leading citizen, owning much of its property as well as the bank and general store. Although a Presbyterian, Georgia Neese briefly attended a small Catholic college in nearby Topeka after graduating from high school in 1917, then transferred to Washburn University in that city. She majored in economics at Washburn and was also active on campus, serving as president of several student organizations, including the drama club. Determined to become an actress, she moved to New York City following graduation in 1921 and enrolled at Sargent's Dramatic School....

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Hillegas, Michael (22 April 1729–29 September 1804), colonial merchant, revolutionary, and first treasurer of the United States, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Michael Hillegas, a naturalized Palatine German and Philadelphia merchant, and Margaret (maiden name unknown). Orphaned at age twenty-one, Hillegas by the following year had taken control of his father’s business interests and begun a career that continued to expand and prosper throughout his life. He sold metal goods, including stoves and stills; had interests in iron manufacturing, sugar refinement, and real estate; and owned at least partial interest in the ship ...

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Meredith, Samuel (1741–10 February 1817), treasurer of the United States, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Reese Meredith, a merchant, and Martha Carpenter. He attended Dr. Allison’s Academy in Philadelphia and then joined his father’s business. As a Philadelphia merchant concerned with the American colonies’ conflicts with Britain, Meredith signed the nonimportation resolutions adopted in Philadelphia on 7 November 1765. He then served as a deputy to the Provincial Convention held in Philadelphia in January 1775. In 1772 Meredith married Margaret Cadwalader of Philadelphia, daughter of Dr. ...

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Priest, Ivy Maude Baker (07 September 1905–23 June 1975), political and governmental official, was born in Kimberly, Utah, the daughter of Orange Decatur Baker, a miner, and Clara Fernley. The family moved in 1911 to Bingham Canyon, where her mother became active in local political affairs. Through her mother, Ivy became interested in politics. As a teenage Republican worker in Bingham she tended children and ran errands for voters at election time....

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Spinner, Francis Elias (21 January 1802–31 December 1890), congressman and treasurer of the United States, was born in German Flats (now Mohawk), New York, the son of recent German immigrants, John Peter Spinner and Mary Brument. His father, a Roman Catholic priest who had renounced his church, was the pastor for two German-speaking congregations of the Dutch Reformed church in Herkimer and German Flats. Although his father was a university graduate, Spinner received only a common school education supplemented with what he could pick up through wide reading. Fascinated by accounting, Spinner longed to enter business, but his father wished him to learn a skilled trade and actually removed him from an apprenticeship to an Albany confectioner because he was being taught sales and bookkeeping. His father then apprenticed him to a saddlemaker in Amsterdam, New York....