1-7 of 7 results  for:

  • education administrator (general) x
  • diplomacy and international relations x
Clear all

Article

Bliss, Tasker Howard (31 December 1853–09 November 1930), soldier, scholar, and diplomat, was born in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, the son of George Ripley Bliss, a Baptist clergyman and professor at Lewisburg Academy (now Bucknell University), and Mary Ann Raymond. After attending Lewisburg Academy for two years, Tasker Bliss was admitted to West Point, where he excelled in foreign languages and finished eighth in his class in 1875. After graduating, he was assigned to the First Artillery in Savannah, Georgia. The next year he returned to West Point for a four-year tour as an instructor in modern languages. His grasp of other tongues included not only his beloved Greek, which he studied relentlessly, but also Latin, French, Spanish, Italian, and Russian. The Custer massacre in 1876 prompted him to request active duty at a frontier post, but Major General ...

Article

Brewster, Kingman, Jr. (17 June 1919–08 November 1988), university president and diplomat, was born in Longmeadow, Massachusetts, the son of Kingman Brewster, Sr., a lawyer, and Florence Besse. He was descended on his father’s side from Elder William Brewster of the Massachusetts Bay Colony. Brewster’s parents divorced when he was six. His mother subsequently married Harvard University music professor Edward Ballentine, and the new family settled in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Brewster attended Belmont Hill School outside Boston (1930–1936), where he took an interest in journalism and debating and also took time to work on the reelection campaign of isolationist Republican senator ...

Article

Clapp, Margaret Antoinette (11 April 1910–03 May 1974), educator and diplomat, was born in East Orange, New Jersey, the daughter of Alfred Chapin, an insurance broker, and Anna Roth. Educated in public schools, she received an A.B. with honors from Wellesley College in 1930, having served as student government president her senior year. Moving back to New Jersey, she commuted to New York City where she attended graduate school part time and taught English literature first at the Todhunter School (1930–1939) and then following its merger, at the Dalton School (1939–1942). She received an A.M. from Columbia University in 1937....

Article

Eddy, William A. (09 March 1896–03 May 1962), diplomat, intelligence agent, and military officer, was born in Sidon, a city in present-day Lebanon, to William King Eddy and Elizabeth (Nelson) Eddy, both of whom were Presbyterian missionaries. Eddy was reared in Beirut, where his father taught at the American University. He had a near-native facility with the Arabic language and could recite long passages from the Koran in several Arabic dialects. After completing his undergraduate degree at Princeton University in 1917, Eddy served in the U.S. Marine Corps during World War I. For his valor as a captain in the Battle of Belleau Wood he was awarded the Navy Cross, the Distinguished Service Cross, two Silver Stars, and two Purple Hearts. As a result of his wartime injuries, Eddy walked with a limp for the rest of his life and often used a cane. In 1917 he married Mary Garvin, also the daughter of Protestant missionaries; the couple had four children....

Image

David Jayne Hill Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-98315).

Article

Hill, David Jayne (10 June 1850–02 March 1932), diplomat and college president, was born in Plainfield, New Jersey, the son of Daniel Trembley Hill, a Baptist minister, and Lydia Ann Thompson. Hill lived in various places during his youth as his father followed calls to a number of pulpits in the Middle Atlantic states. In 1870 Hill enrolled at the University of Lewisburg in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, graduating as valedictorian in 1874. That year he married Anna Liddell; they had one son. Hill was to asked to join the faculty, rising quickly to professor of rhetoric in 1877. A battle for control of the college between traditional rural, small-town Baptists in the Lewisburg region and modernists in the metropolitan Philadelphia area soon elevated him further. The latter group won, ousted the president, and replaced him with the 29-year-old Hill. He quickly legalized fraternities, reduced restrictions on student lives, permitted elective courses, and encouraged faculty to play a greater role in governance. To lessen fiscal pressures Hill virtually put the college’s name up for sale and persuaded William Bucknell, a wealthy Philadelphia Baptist, to effectively purchase the University of Lewisburg, which was renamed Bucknell University. Bucknell, in turn, placed money and power in the young president’s hands....

Article

White, Andrew Dickson (07 November 1832–04 November 1918), university president and diplomat, was born in Homer, New York, the son of Horace White, a businessman, and Clara Dickson. Vigilant lest their wealth spoil Andrew, the Whites emphasized the duty of every person to serve others. At his parents’ request, he enrolled at Geneva College, a small Episcopalian institution near Syracuse. In search of a more challenging intellectual environment, he transferred to Yale in his sophomore year and completed his undergraduate degree in 1853. Uncertain about his vocation, White traveled to Europe, first as unpaid attaché to Thomas H. Seymour, U.S. minister to Russia, and then as a student in Germany, where in the heady atmosphere of ...