1-20 of 41 results  for:

  • alternative medical practice x
Clear all

Article

Anderson, Garland (1886–31 May 1939), playwright and minister, was born in Wichita, Kansas. Little is known about his parents, although his mother is said to have been an active reformer and a poet. Garland completed four years of school (the only formal education he ever received) before his father moved his family to California to take a job as a janitor in the post office. The following year Garland’s mother died, and at age twelve he left home to become a newsboy, selling the ...

Article

Austin, Harriet N. (1825–1891), hydropathic physician and health and dress reformer, was born in Connecticut but raised in Moravia, New York. Little is known about her parentage or early life. At age twenty-six she enrolled in the first class of the coeducational American Hydropathic Institute operated by ...

Image

Simon Baruch. Courtesy of the National Library of Medicine (B01386).

Article

Baruch, Simon (29 July 1840–03 June 1921), physician and sanitarian, was born in Schwersenz, Prussia, to Polish Jews Bernhard Baruch and Theresa Gruen. His parents’ occupations are unknown. He attended the Royal Friedrich Wilhelm Gymnasium in Posen for about seven years before emigrating to the United States in 1855 and settling in Camden, South Carolina, in 1859. In Camden, he apprenticed himself to Drs. Thomas J. Workman and Lynch Horry Deas. Baruch attended the Medical College of South Carolina in Charleston in 1860–1861 and completed his education at the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond in 1862, after the South Carolina school closed at the outbreak of the Civil War. His college expenses were paid by Mannes Baum, a family friend from Schwersenz, who had sponsored his emigration in 1855. Baruch became a U.S. citizen on 19 January 1871....

Article

Barbara A. Van Brimmer

Beach, Wooster (1794–28 January 1868), physician, was born in Trumbull, Connecticut, the son of Lewis Beach. His father was of English descent and his mother’s name is unknown. Beach received a scant education in a rural school. As a young man, he developed a zealous interest in reforming religious and medical practices of the time. He particularly distrusted current medical practices and was familiar with the criticisms of physicians such as ...

Article

Buchanan, Joseph Rodes (11 December 1814–26 December 1899), physician and author, was born in Frankfort, Kentucky, the son of Joseph Buchanan, a physician, and Nancy Rodes Garth. His father had a varied career as a physician and journalist and was one of the first faculty members at Transylvania University in Lexington. Upon his father’s death in 1829, Buchanan worked as both a printer and schoolteacher in Lexington. In 1835 he became acquainted with the “science” of phrenology formulated by the European investigators, Franz Joseph Gall and Johann Gaspar Spurzheim. Buchanan found phrenology to be a promising technique for investigating humanity’s moral and intellectual capacities and resolved to further his studies by entering medical school at the University of Louisville....

Image

Charles Caldwell. Courtesy of the National Library of Medicine (B04072).

Article

Caldwell, Charles (14 May 1772–09 July 1853), physician, author, and teacher, was born in Caswell County, North Carolina, the son of Charles Caldwell, a farmer. His mother’s maiden name was Murray, although her given name is unknown. Caldwell’s father was an elder in the Presbyterian church and wanted Charles to become a minister. Accordingly, from the age of eleven to fourteen, Caldwell studied Latin and classical literature at a Latin school operated by Dominie Harris in Mecklenburg County. By the time Caldwell left Harris’s school, however, he had decided against a religious career....

Article

Cayce, Edgar (18 March 1877–03 January 1945), psychic "reader" and influential figure in "alternative" medicine and spirituality, psychic “reader” and influential figure in “alternative” medicine and spirituality, was born near Hopkinsville, Kentucky, the son of Leslie B. Cayce, a tobacco farmer and small-town businessman, and Carrie Elizabeth Major. Cayce was raised in the Christian church (Disciples of Christ), taught Sunday school, and always saw himself as a Christian and active churchgoer. He left school while a teenager to become apprenticed to a photographer and pursued photography as a career for the first part of his life. He married Gertrude Evans in 1903; the union produced three sons. The couple initially made their home in Bowling Green, Kentucky, where Cayce set up a photography business. In 1909 he moved the business to Selma, Alabama....

Article

Dunham, Carroll (29 October 1828–18 February 1876), physician and educator, was born in New York City, the son of Edward Wood Dunham, a prosperous commission merchant and the first president of New York’s Corn Exchange Bank, and Maria Smyth Parker. Dunham’s mother died during the cholera epidemic of 1834, when Dunham was six years of age....

Article

Erickson, Milton Hyland (05 December 1901–25 March 1980), psychiatrist and hypnotherapist, was born in Aurum, Nevada, the son of Albert Erickson, a miner and prospector, and Clara Florence Miner. Around 1905 the family resettled on a farm in Wisconsin, where Erickson was raised. In 1925 he married Helen Hutton; they divorced in 1935. Erickson attended the University of Wisconsin, where he received a B.A. in 1927 and an M.A. in psychology and a medical degree, both in 1928. While still an undergraduate, he began to experiment with hypnotic techniques. By his junior year, Erickson had hypnotized several hundred people and performed demonstrations of hypnosis for the faculties of the medical school and the psychology department....

Article

Evans, Warren Felt (23 December 1817–04 September 1889), author of books on mental healing and metaphysical religion, was born in Rockingham, Vermont, the son of Eli Evans and Sarah Edson, farmers. He married M. Charlotte Tinker in 1840; they had three children. After spending a few years at Middlebury and Dartmouth Colleges, he was ordained a Methodist Episcopal minister in New Hampshire in 1844. Evans served in eleven different churches before his interest in the writings of the Swedish mystic Emanuel Swedenborg prompted him to resign from the Methodist ministry in 1864 and join the New Church of Jerusalem. For years he had been afflicted with a nervous disorder resulting in chronic poor health. The so-called “regular physicians” of the time and their various medicines had proved of no help. Then, in 1863, Evans visited the famed mental healer ...

Article

Fowler, Lorenzo Niles (23 June 1811–02 September 1896), phrenologist, was born in Cohocton, Steuben County, New York, the son of Horace Fowler and Martha Howe, farmers. He pursued studies that would lead to the ministry and also studied in the classical department of Amherst Academy, Amherst, Massachusetts. Deeply influenced by his older brother ...

Article

Fowler, Orson Squire (11 October 1809–18 August 1887), phrenologist and publisher, was born in Cohocton, Steuben County, New York, the son of Horace Fowler, a farmer, and Martha Howe. He was graduated from Amherst College in 1834 and in 1835 married Eliza Brevoort Chevalier, a widow, by whom he had two children. Though educated for the ministry, he devoted himself to phrenology, the “science” of the mind that was formulated by Franz Joseph Gall and introduced to the United States by Johann Gaspar Spurzheim. Phrenology postulated that, because the brain was the organ of the mind and shaped the skull, there was an observable concomitance between the mind (talents, disposition, character) and the shape of the head. In an analysis, a phrenologist examined the latter to determine the former. Immediately after graduation Fowler started his professional career as itinerant practical phrenologist in New England. Using charts and a phrenological bust, he lectured on phrenology and analyzed heads, sizing “organs” or “faculties” such as amativeness, combativeness, firmness, and ideality to determine character. It was believed that each faculty manifested itself through its own cerebral organ, the size of which indicated its functional power. The size of the organ, it was believed, could be increased or decreased by exercise....

Article

Christopher Ellithorp

Gram, Hans Burch (13 July 1787–26 February 1840), physician, was born Hans Benjamin Gramm in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Hans Gram, secretary to the Danish governor of Santa Cruz, and Jane Burdick. After the death of his parents, he left Boston in 1806 or 1807 to claim his grandfather’s estate in Copenhagen, Denmark. Gram obtained a portion of the estate that allowed him to secure an education. Through the favor of his uncle, a Dr. Fenger, physician to the Danish king, he became a student at the Royal Medical and Surgical Institute. Fenger also provided him entrée to other schools and hospitals in northern Europe....

Article

Guernsey, Egbert (08 July 1823–19 September 1903), homeopathic physician, was born in Litchfield, Connecticut, the son of John Guernsey and Amanda Crosby. His education at Phillips Andover Academy prepared him for a year’s work teaching, after which he took a year’s scientific course at Yale College. He began the study of medicine with ...

Article

Hale, Edwin Moses (02 February 1829–15 January 1899), homeopathic physician, was born in Newport, New Hampshire, the son of Syene Hale, a physician, and Betsy Dow. In 1836 the family moved to Fredonia, Ohio, where Hale attended public school until the age of fifteen, when he removed to Newark, Ohio, to learn printing. He became associate editor of the local newspaper and, briefly, deputy postmaster. He then gave up journalism for the study of law....

Article

Hempel, Charles Julius (05 September 1811–24 September 1879), homeopathic physician, was born in Solingen, Germany. Little is known of his parentage and early life. After completing his college education, Hempel was compelled to take the Prussian military examination, which he passed, enabling him to defer service until age twenty-four. He took the opportunity to study at the Collège de France and the University of Paris, supporting himself by translating. He attended lectures by chemist Joseph Gay-Lussac, physician François Broussais, and Jules Michelet. Hempel lived with Michelet’s family for six months while assisting the historian with his ...

Article

Hering, Constantine (01 January 1800–23 July 1880), homeopathic physician and educator, was born in Oschatz, Saxony, the son of Christian Gottlieb Karl Hering, a school headmaster and church organist, and Christiane Friedericke Kreutzberg. After receiving “classical schooling” in Zittau, Saxony, he began studying medicine in Dresden in 1817. While taking courses in medicine at the University of Leipzig in 1820, he was asked by his teacher to write a paper denouncing homeopathic medicine (a system of therapeutics developed by Samuel Hahnemann, based on the principle that a substance that is capable of causing symptoms in a healthy person is capable of curing similar symptoms when they occur as a part of a natural illness). Hering investigated the system and became convinced of its efficacy. He transferred to the University of Wurzburg and received his medical degree in 1826. Hering worked for a short time as a teacher of mathematics and natural sciences in Dresden. An avid naturalist and botanist, he was commissioned as a naturalist by the king of Saxony and was sent to Surinam to collect specimens. After contributing articles to several homeopathic journals in Europe, Hering was asked by the king to cease his involvement in medicine while in Surinam. In response to this request, Hering resigned his commission and stayed on to practice medicine. He remained in Surinam until 1833, at which time he was invited to join a colleague in the United States and settled in Philadelphia....

Article

Kellogg, John Harvey (26 February 1852–14 December 1943), physician, surgeon, and health reformer, was born in rural Livingston County, Michigan, the son of John Preston Kellogg and Anne Stanley, farmers. In 1852 Kellogg’s parents accepted the religious teachings that led to the organization of the Seventh-day Adventist church in 1863. This decision had a marked influence on their son’s life. By 1856 the family had resettled in Battle Creek, Michigan. Part of the proceeds from the sale of their farm was used to relocate the infant Adventist publishing plant from Rochester, New York, to Battle Creek, where Kellogg’s father now operated a small store and broom shop....