1-5 of 5 results  for:

  • oil or gas industrialist x
  • Business and finance x
  • Manufacture and trade x
Clear all

Article

Addicks, John Edward O’Sullivan (21 November 1841–07 August 1919), promoter and aspiring politician, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of John Edward Addicks, a politician and civil servant, and Margaretta McLeod. Addicks’s father achieved local political prominence and arranged for his son to take a job at age fifteen as a runner for a local dry goods business. Four years later Addicks took a job with a flour company and, upon reaching his twenty-first birthday, became a full partner in the business. Like many Quaker City merchants, Addicks speculated in local real estate in the booming port town, avoided service in the Civil War, and achieved a modicum of prosperity in the postwar period. He became overextended, as he would be most of his career, however, and went broke in the 1873 depression....

Article

Getty, J. Paul (15 December 1892–06 June 1976), petroleum entrepreneur, was born Jean Paul Getty in Minneapolis, Minnesota, the son of George Franklin Getty, an attorney and oil investor, and Sarah Catherine McPherson Risher. Getty’s father invested in oil in Bartlesville, Indian Territory (now Okla.), with the company incorporated as the Minnehoma Oil Company. The business struck oil in 1903, and young Getty accompanied his father to Indian Territory, during which time he developed a fascination for the oil industry. Getty attended Emerson Grammar School in Minneapolis and then, after the family moved, attended Harvard Military Academy in Los Angeles while working in his father’s oil fields during summer vacations. Other oil strikes at Tulsa and Glenn Pool added to the family’s wealth, but Getty’s father moved to California more for the climate and personal reasons than for business. Getty graduated from high school in 1909 and agreed to work for his father, saying he wanted to “start at the bottom.” He entered the University of Southern California to study political science and economics and then transferred to the University of California at Berkeley in 1911, only to resign from his courses without graduating that year. He then studied at Oxford, sat for a noncollegiate diploma in economics and political science in June 1913, and graduated. After graduation he traveled in Europe and then returned to the United States....

Article

Phillips, Frank (28 November 1873–23 August 1950), oilman and banker, was born in Scotia, Nebraska, the son of Lewis F. Phillips, a farmer, county assessor, and judge, and Lucinda Josephine Faucett, a schoolteacher. Although Phillips was born in Nebraska, his father’s farming career necessitated a move to Creston, Iowa, in 1874. There Frank attended the local school but dropped out at age fourteen. Phillips would have no contact with the realm of formal education until he received a number of honorary degrees years later....

Article

Richardson, Sid Williams (25 April 1891–30 September 1959), oilman and entrepreneur, was born in Athens, Texas, the son of Nancy “Nannie” Bradley and John Isidore Richardson, a farmer and cattleman. He was named for an itinerant evangelist. Richardson’s father reportedly got the better of him in Sid’s first attempt at making a business deal, but the youth learned quickly. While still in high school he traveled to Louisiana and maneuvered local cattlemen into underbidding each other, resulting in cheap calves for Richardson and a $3,500 profit when he sold them in Texas....

Article

Rogers, Henry Huttleston (29 January 1840–19 May 1909), oil tycoon, railroad builder, and capitalist, was born at Fairhaven, Massachusetts, the son of Rowland Rogers, a bookkeeper, and Mary Eldredge Huttleston. A high school graduate, Rogers worked in his hometown five years before leaving in 1861 for Pennsylvania, where oil had been discovered in 1859. Beginning with a $1,200 investment in a small refinery erected at McClintockville, Pennsylvania, Rogers and a partner, Charles Ellis, made $30,000 their first year. In 1866 Rogers met ...