1-20 of 23 results  for:

  • Education and scholarship x
  • Religion and belief x
  • scholars of language and culture x
Clear all

Article

Adler, Cyrus (13 September 1863–07 April 1940), academic administrator and Jewish communal leader, was born in Van Buren, Arkansas, to Samuel Adler, a merchant and planter, and Sarah Sulzberger. At an early age Adler’s family moved to Philadelphia and then to New York, where his father died in 1867. The family returned to Philadelphia, where his mother’s brother, David Sulzberger, became head of the household and was a great influence on Adler’s upbringing. As a boy, Adler received an intensive education in Judaic subjects from a consortium of Philadelphia rabbis, headed by ...

Article

Alexander, Joseph Addison (24 April 1809–28 January 1860), Presbyterian scholar and minister, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Janetta Waddel and Archibald Alexander, a Presbyterian minister. Alexander, who was always called Addison, grew up in Princeton, New Jersey, where in 1812 his father was called to be the first professor at Princeton Theological Seminary. At an early age, Alexander displayed the ability in languages that would make him a marvel throughout his life. By the time he began formal instruction with local tutors, his father had taught him the rudiments of Latin and Greek and also introduced him to Semitic languages. By the time he graduated from the College of New Jersey as a seventeen-year old in 1826, he had read the Koran in Arabic, made considerable progress in Persian and Syriac, and begun the wide-ranging study of contemporary European languages that he never stopped. It was his habit, begun before entering college and continuing to the week of his death, to read the Bible daily in at least six languages. Alexander’s nephew and biographer, Henry Carrington Alexander, concluded that he read, wrote, and spoke Latin, German, French, Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese; that he read without helps and wrote Arabic, Hebrew, Persian, Greek, Romaic, and Chaldean; that he could read Ethiopic, Dutch, Sanskrit, Syriac, Coptic, Danish, Flemish, and Norwegian; and that he knew enough Polish, Swedish, Malay, Hindustani, and Chinese to peruse works in these languages. The linguistic marvel was also a social recluse who never married and who, despite great interest in travel and world affairs, lived contentedly in Princeton as a student and professor his whole life. ...

Article

Andrews, Lorrin (29 April 1795–29 September 1868), missionary and educator, was born in East Windsor (now Vernon), Connecticut, the son of Samuel Andrews and his wife, whose name is unknown. Andrews grew up on the frontier in Kentucky and Ohio and later attended Jefferson College in Pennsylvania. After graduation he studied at Princeton Theological Seminary in New Jersey, where he graduated in 1825. He worked as a mechanic and printer while in school, and later as a teacher. On 26 April 1827 he volunteered his services to the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions (ABCFM) and was accepted for work in the Sandwich Islands, as Hawaii was then called. His various job experiences and his life in rough pioneer country where hard work was valued prepared him well for his missionary tasks....

Article

Barton, George Aaron (12 November 1859–28 June 1942), Assyriologist and biblical scholar, was born in East Farnham, Quebec, Canada, the son of Daniel Barton, a farmer and blacksmith, and Mary Stevens Bull. He attended the Oakwood Seminary, Poughkeepsie, New York, becoming a minister of the Society of Friends in 1879, and graduated from Haverford College with an A.B. in 1882 and an M.A. in 1885. Around 1883 he moved to Boston, where he worked in insurance for a year, then from 1884 to 1889 taught mathematics and classics at the Friends School in Providence, Rhode Island. In 1884 he married Caroline Brewer Danforth; they adopted one child. In 1889 he entered Harvard Graduate School (M.A. 1890), where he studied Assyriology with David G. Lyon and Semitics and the Bible with Crawford H. Toy and Joseph H. Thayer. In 1891 he received his Ph.D. for a study, “The Semitic Ishtar Cult,” later published in the ...

Article

Boardman, Sarah Hall (04 November 1803–01 September 1845), Baptist missionary and translator, was born in Alstead, New Hampshire, the daughter of Ralph Hall and Abiah O. Hall (her maiden name). Sarah learned Latin, read widely in Christian apologetics and philosophy, and taught school for a time. She was also a writer and poet, and as the eldest of thirteen children, she helped to raise her siblings. Sarah converted to the Christian faith at age sixteen and was baptized by Lucius Bolles, a Baptist pastor in Salem, Massachusetts. In 1825 she married the Reverend George Dana Boardman; they had three children. The couple then accepted a missionary assignment with the Baptist Board of Foreign Missions in Burma. Temporarily detained in Calcutta, India, due to the Burmese War, they arrived in Moulmain in 1827 and settled in Tavoy in 1828. In 1831 George died, and Boardman was left with her children in Tavoy, which was under military siege....

Article

Gallaudet, Thomas (03 June 1822–27 August 1902), Episcopal minister to the deaf, was born in Hartford, Connecticut, the son of Thomas Hopkins Gallaudet, educator of the deaf, and Sophia Fowler. Thomas Hopkins had founded the Connecticut Asylum, a school for the deaf in Hartford in 1817, and Sophia was one of its first graduates. They had little money but their work was well known and brought them into contact with the highest echelons of society. Growing up in these surroundings, Thomas early became interested in education for the deaf and particularly in communication through sign language....

Article

Goodell, William (14 February 1792–18 February 1867), missionary and linguist, was born in Templeton, Massachusetts, the son of William Goodell and Phebe Newton, farmers. Goodell’s father was too poor to provide an education for his son but recognized that his mind was keen and that his physique was not suited for hard manual labor. Consequently he encouraged Goodell to seek aid from the charity fund at Phillips Academy in Andover. At the age of fifteen he packed all of his belongings and walked sixty miles to Andover, where he so impressed the preceptor ...

Article

Haupt, Paul (25 November 1858–15 December 1926), Assyriologist and biblical scholar, was born in Görlitz, Germany, the son of Carl Gottlieb Haupt, a police officer, and Elise Hülse. He dropped his two original first names, Hermann Hugo, early in life. Graduating from the Gymnasium Augustum in Görlitz, he prepared for a career in music, but after entering the University of Leipzig, he concentrated in Semitic languages. He received his Ph.D. in 1878, under Friedrich Delitzsch; his dissertation was published in 1879 as ...

Article

Jones, George Heber (14 August 1867–11 May 1919), Methodist missionary and student of Korean culture, was born in Mohawk, New York, the son of Charles Edward Jones and Susan Cosser. Educated in the public schools of Utica, New York, he left for the Korean mission field at the age of twenty in 1887, less than three years after the Methodist church had begun its work there. American Methodists William B. Scranton and Henry Gerhardt Appenzeller had reached Seoul, Korea, early in 1885 and realized the daunting obstacles they faced, principally profound cultural differences and local suspicions. But they persevered and in 1886 called for two new men to augment their work. In 1887 Jones accompanied Franklin Ollinger, a veteran missionary, to Seoul. Two years later other Methodist missionaries arrived, notably women. This small staff endured continual hardships, including disease and political turmoil, in establishing an enduring Methodist presence in Korea....

Article

Kellogg, Samuel Henry (06 September 1839–03 May 1899), missionary-linguist and pastor, was born in Quogue, Suffolk County, New York, the son of Samuel Kellogg, a Presbyterian minister, and Mary Pierce Henry. As a child he was precocious but frail, and he received his early education at home, except for about six months at Haverstraw (N.Y.) Mountain Institute. He attended Williams College briefly in 1856 but withdrew because of ill health. He matriculated at Princeton University in 1858 and graduated in 1861 as one of the top two graduates of the 100 members of his class. He then entered Princeton Seminary, from which he graduated in 1864. During his final seminary year, he was an instructor in mathematics at the college....

Article

Montgomery, James Alan (13 June 1866–06 February 1949), Semitist and clergyman, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Thomas Harrison Montgomery and Anna Morton. In 1887 he graduated with a B.A. degree from the University of Pennsylvania, where in 1904 he also received his Ph.D., having specialized in biblical Hebrew. During the same period he studied theology at the Philadelphia Divinity School from which he was graduated in 1890 and became a deacon of the Protestant Episcopal church. In 1893 he was consecrated as a priest. That same year he married Mary Frank Owen; they had no children. He was a curate at the Church of the Holy Communion in New York City in 1892–1893; at St. Paul’s in West Philadelphia from 1893 to 1895; and at St. Peter’s in Philadelphia from 1895 to 1899. From 1899 until 1903 he was rector of the Church of the Epiphany in Germantown, also serving as assistant editor of the ...

Article

Morgan, Abel (1673–16 December 1722), Baptist minister, translator, and biblical scholar, was born in Alltgoch, Llanwenog, Cardiganshire, Wales, the son of Morgan ap Rhydderch ap Dafydd, a Baptist pastor; his mother’s name is unknown. Although the details of Morgan’s formal education are obscure, his accomplishments indicate that care was taken, for he followed in the traditions of an uncle, a great-uncle, and a great-grandfather, all of whom were noted as poets, writers, or translators....

Article

Neumark, David (03 August 1866–15 December 1924), rabbi, Jewish philosopher, and Hebraist, was born in Szczerzec, Galicia, the son of Solomon Neumark, a shopkeeper, and Schifrah Scheutz. He received a traditional Jewish education and attended cheder (a communal Jewish elementary school) at a very young age while simultaneously receiving supplemental Hebraic instruction from his father who was himself a learned Jew. When his father died, Neumark’s mother ran the family store on her own so that her seven-year-old son would be able to continue his Jewish education. After finishing ...

Article

Pareja, Francisco (15??–15 June? 1628?), priest and missionary, was born in Aunon, diocese of Toledo, Spain. Nothing is known about his birth, parentage, or life before his arrival in Florida in 1595 except that he entered the Franciscan Order of Friars Minor in the order’s province of Castile....

Image

Albert Pike. Photoprint, c. 1886. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-100590).

Article

Pike, Albert (29 December 1809–02 April 1891), lawyer, soldier, and Masonic scholar, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Benjamin Pike, a cobbler, and Sarah Andrews. The boy was torn between his father, whose irreverence and drinking scandalized neighbors, and his mother, who read the Bible to her only son daily and planned on his entering the ministry. In 1813, seeking to supplement his income by farming, Benjamin Pike moved the family to Newburyport, Massachusetts. In 1825 Albert was sent to live with his uncle, a teacher at Framingham Academy, who soon learned that Pike had a prodigious memory that enabled him to digest large volumes and recall their contents at will; the boy learned Hebrew, Latin, and Greek almost effortlessly. Eight months after his arrival in Framingham, Pike passed the entrance examination for Harvard College. He could not afford the tuition, however, so, instead of enrolling at Harvard, he taught common school at Gloucester. The following year Harvard agreed to admit him as a junior, but school officials insisted that he pay the first two years’ tuition. Outraged, Pike abandoned his dreams of a formal education....

Article

Pool, David De Sola (16 May 1885–01 December 1970), religious leader and author, was born in London, England, the son of Eleazar Pool, a businessman, and Abigail Davis. He graduated from University College of the University of London in 1905. He had concurrently attended Jews’ College, where he pursued rabbinic studies. Continuing his studies at the Rabbinical Seminary in Berlin, he earned in 1907 his doctoral degree from Heidelberg University. His thesis, a study of the ...

Article

Riggs, Stephen Return (23 March 1812–24 August 1883), missionary and linguist, was born in Steubenville, Ohio, the son of Stephen Riggs, a blacksmith, and Anna Baird. He was educated at the Latin school in Ripley, Ohio, at Jefferson College, and for one year at Western Theological Seminary. On 6 April 1836 he was ordained by the Chillicothe Presbytery at West Union, Ohio. He preached for a year in Hawley, Massachusetts, where in February 1837, he married Mary A. C. Longley, to whom he had become engaged while she was teaching school in southern Indiana. The couple had eight children. Her father, General Thomas Longley, was for many years in the General Court of Massachusetts, and her grandfather, Colonel Edmund Longley, had served under Washington....

Article

Salisbury, Edward Elbridge (06 April 1814–05 February 1901), Orientalist, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Josiah Salisbury, a merchant and clergyman, and Abby Breese. He received his preliminary education at home from his father and later at the Boston Latin School and graduated from Yale in 1832. He remained for the next four years in New Haven, studying Hebrew and theology in preparation for a career as a minister. Under the influence of his teacher ...

Article

Schereschewsky, Samuel Isaac Joseph (06 May 1831–15 October 1906), Episcopal bishop and translator, was born in Tauroggen, Russian Lithuania, the son of Samuel Joseph Schereschewsky and Rosa Salvatha. His father was of the Ashkenazic and his mother of the Sephardic Jews. Both of his parents, about whom little is known, died when he was a boy, and he was raised by a half brother and his wife, who wanted him to become a rabbi. From about 1846 to 1850 he studied at the rabbinical schools at Krazi and Zhitomir, Russia. From 1852 to 1854 he studied at the University of Breslau, Germany. At Zhitomir and Breslau his interest in Christianity was aroused by missionaries of the London Society for Promoting Christianity among the Jews, but it probably was his study of a Hebrew translation of the New Testament that convinced him that Jesus had fulfilled the messianic prophecies of the Hebrew Bible (or Old Testament)....