1-20 of 111 results  for:

  • Education and scholarship x
  • educational reform x
Clear all

Article

Alberty, Harold Bernard (06 October 1890–02 February 1971), professor of curriculum design and development, was born in Lockport, New York, the son of Willard K. Alberty and Carrie L. Post. Alberty attended rural schools in northeastern Ohio and was graduated from Liverpool Township High School in Medina County, Ohio, in 1908. In 1912 Alberty was graduated from Baldwin University (now Baldwin-Wallace College) in Berea, Ohio, where he studied liberal arts and pre-law subjects. He taught eighth grade in the Berea schools during his final year of college in an effort to underwrite his tuition and continued to hold this position until 1913, when he was graduated from Cleveland Law School and was admitted to the Ohio bar. Because no law positions were then available, Alberty continued to teach, an activity that fascinated him, and he rose quickly in the county school administration, serving as assistant principal of Berea High School from 1913 to 1915; superintendent of Berea schools from 1915 to 1917; district superintendent of Cuyahoga County schools from 1917 to 1920; and assistant Cuyahoga County superintendent from 1920 to 1924. He received an A.M. in school administration from Ohio State University in 1923. Throughout this period Alberty planned to return to the practice of law. In 1916 he married Anna Hower; they had one child. Their marriage ended with her death in the latter 1940s....

Image

A. Bronson Alcott. At age fifty-three. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-54729).

Article

Alcott, A. Bronson (29 November 1799–04 March 1888), Transcendentalist and reformer, was born Amos Bronson Alcox in Wolcott, Connecticut, the son of Joseph Chatfield Alcox and Anna Bronson, farmers. Farming the rocky Connecticut soil was not lucrative, and Alcott worked hard with his parents to help support seven younger siblings, thereby limiting his opportunities for a formal education. He attended the local district school until age ten, but thereafter his intellectual growth largely depended on his own reading and discussions with friends of a similar scholarly bent, the first being his cousin William Andrus Alcott. William later attended Yale College and established a career as a physician and popular author of health manuals, but continuing poverty prevented Bronson from obtaining a college education. At age fifteen he, like many of his young Connecticut contemporaries, began peddling small manufactured goods, first in Massachusetts and New York, then in Virginia and the Carolinas....

Article

Alderman, Edwin Anderson (15 May 1861–29 April 1931), educational reformer and university president, was born in Wilmington, North Carolina, the son of James Alderman, a timber inspector, and Susan Jane Corbett. Alderman attended private schools in Wilmington before spending two years (1876–1878) at the Bethel Military Academy near Warrenton, Virginia. In 1878 he entered the University of North Carolina, from which he received a Ph.B. with honors in English and Latin. His developing mastery of the beauty and power of the spoken word was recognized when he won a medal for oratory at the 1882 commencement exercises. In 1885 he married Emma Graves; they had three children, all of whom died in early childhood....

Article

Andrews, Fannie Fern Phillips (25 September 1867–23 January 1950), pacifist and educational reformer, was born in Margaretville, Nova Scotia, the daughter of William Wallace Phillips, a shoemaker, and Anna Maria Brown, a church activist. Andrews grew up in Lynn, Massachusetts; she graduated from Salem Normal School in 1884 and taught school in Lynn between 1884 and 1890. In 1890 she married Edwin G. Andrews, a salesman in Lynn; they had no children. In 1895–1896 Andrews resumed her studies, at the Harvard summer school, and in 1902 she received her A.B. from Radcliffe in education and psychology....

Article

Antony, Milton (07 August 1789–19 September 1839), physician and educator, was born presumably in Henry County, Virginia, the son of James Antony, Sr., a military officer, and Ann Tate. At sixteen, he became an apprentice under physician Joel Abbott of Monticello, Georgia. At nineteen he enrolled in the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine but, owing to economic circumstances, had to leave without a diploma. He married Nancy Godwin in 1809. They had eleven children....

Article

Bardin, Shlomo ( December 1898–16 May 1976), Jewish educator, was born Shlomo Bardinstein in Zhitomir, Ukraine, the son of Haim Israel Bardinstein and Menia Weissburd, members of Zhitomir’s Jewish bourgeoisie. After completing his secondary education at the Zhitomir School of Commerce in 1918, he left Russia for Palestine, which was probably when he shortened his name to “Bardin.” From 1920 he worked as an administrative assistant at the Hebrew Secondary School in Haifa before leaving in 1923 for the University of Berlin, where he studied history and economics. Two years later he entered University College in London for a year’s study of English. Bardin returned to Haifa in 1926 and spent two years teaching at the Hebrew Boarding School. He went to New York City in 1928 and was accepted as a graduate student at Columbia University’s Teachers College. At Columbia he studied comparative education with progressive educators who urged him to research the Danish Folk High School to examine its creative use of music to reach disaffected youth. He received his M.A. in 1930. In 1931 Bardin married a sculptor, Ruth Jonas, daughter of a wealthy Brooklyn lawyer; the couple would have two children....

Article

Barnard, Henry (24 January 1811–05 July 1900), educator and editor, was born in Hartford, Connecticut, the son of Chauncey Barnard, a sea captain and farmer, and Betsey Andrews. Barnard spent his formative years in Connecticut and graduated from Yale in 1830. Immediately after college he taught school in Pennsylvania for a year and loathed it. He then read law and was admitted to the Connecticut bar in 1834; however, he never practiced. During the winter of 1832–1833 he spent three months in Washington, D.C., where he met many of the leading political figures of the day, and then traveled in the South. Still lacking direction, he embarked on a grand tour of Europe in March 1835; the impetus for the trip was his selection as one of the Connecticut delegates to the London international peace congress. While in England he was introduced to a number of the foremost Whig intellectuals, politicians, and reformers; at the time he seemed to be primarily interested in the cause of prison reform. After touring England he spent six months on the Continent before returning home to attend his ailing father....

Article

Barnes, Mary Downing Sheldon (15 September 1850–27 August 1898), educator, was born in Oswego, New York, the daughter of Edward Austin Sheldon, an educator, and Frances Anna Bradford Stiles. After completing her early education in the public schools of Oswego, she entered the Oswego Normal and Training School, where she finished the classical course in 1868 and the advanced course the following year. While at Oswego, Sheldon was greatly influenced by her father, who as principal of the school had molded the institution into a leading center of Pestalozzian-based education. Following graduation, she taught at the Normal and Training School in Oswego for two years before entering the sophomore class at the University of Michigan in September 1871. One of the first female students to attend the university, Sheldon was originally interested in the natural sciences. Having taken two history courses under Professor C. K. Adams, however, she was invited to teach Greek, Latin, and botany as well as history at the Normal and Training School upon her graduation in 1874. Denied the chance to teach her first love, physics, she “revenge[d] herself by applying scientific methods to history” (Barnes, quoted in Keohane, p. 68)....

Article

Berkson, Isaac Baer (23 December 1881–10 March 1975), educational philosopher, was born Isadore Berkson in Brooklyn, New York, the son of Henry Berkson, a merchant, and Jennie Berkman. He attended the City College of New York (1908–1912), where he received a B.A. in liberal arts, Greek, and Latin; and Columbia University and Teachers College (1912–1919), where he earned a master of arts in history of philosophy and sociology of education and a Ph.D. in philosophy and education. In 1919 he married Libbie Suchoff; the couple had three children....

Article

Bestor, Arthur Eugene (19 May 1879–03 February 1944), president of the Chautauqua Institution, was born in Dixon, Illinois, the son of Orson P. Bestor, a Baptist minister, and Laura Ellen Moore. Arthur Bestor attended Wayland Academy in Beaver Dam, Wisconsin, before moving to the University of Chicago, from which he received a bachelor’s degree in 1901. From 1903 to 1905 Bestor pursued doctoral studies at the University of Chicago in history and political science but did not complete the degree. In 1905 he married Jeanette Louise Lemon; they had four children....

Image

Arthur Dean Bevan. Courtesy of the Clendening History of Medicine Library, University of Kansas Medical Center.

Article

Bevan, Arthur Dean (09 August 1861–10 June 1943), surgeon and reformer of medical education, was born in Chicago, Illinois, the son of Thomas Bevan, a physician, and Sarah Elizabeth Ramsey. After attending high school in Chicago, Bevan earned his Ph.B. at Yale’s Sheffield Scientific School in 1881. He then entered Rush Medical College in Chicago and obtained his M.D. in 1883. He finished first in the competitive examination for the U.S. Marine Hospital Service....

Article

Blow, Susan Elizabeth (07 June 1843–?27 Mar. 1916), educational reformer, was born in Carondelet, a section of St. Louis, Missouri, the daughter of Henry Taylor Blow, a wealthy owner of lead-mining operations, president of the Iron Mountain Railroad, state senator, and minister to Venezuela and Brazil, and Minerva Grimsley, daughter of another prominent manufacturer and local politician. Susan Blow grew up in a large household and an environment of high German culture, business, and government affairs. Her extended family and social network included uncles, cousins, and business associates of her father who were involved in local, state, national, and international politics. Her grandfather Peter Blow had brought slaves with him from Virginia and Alabama. One of them was ...

Article

Blum, Virgil Clarence (27 March 1913–05 April 1993), educator, author, activist, and clergyman, was born in Defiance, Iowa, one of twelve children of John Peter and Elizabeth (Rushenberg) Blum, both farmers. His grade school and high school years were spent at St. Peter's school in Defiance. In 1932 he began college at Dowling College, Des Moines, Iowa, and the next year transferred to Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska. On 31 Aug. 1934 he entered the Society of Jesus at St. Stanislaus Seminary at Florissant, Missouri, where he earned a bachelor's degree in Latin and English in 1938. (A brother, Victor Joseph, also became a Jesuit and became a professor of geophysics and seismology at St. Louis University). Virgil studied philosophy at St. Louis University in St. Louis, Missouri, continuing studies in the summer until he earned a master's degree in history and political science in 1945....

Article

Brameld, Theodore Burghard Hurt (20 January 1904–18 October 1987), professor of philosophy and philosophy of education, was born in Neillsville, Wisconsin, the son of Theodore E. Brameld, a real estate agent, and Minnie Dangers, a crafts teacher. Brameld was graduated in 1922 from Neillsville High School and attended Ripon College, from which he was graduated in 1926. He then held an administrative position at the college and in 1928 enrolled at the University of Chicago to study philosophy. He received a Ph.D. in 1931, having studied the works of ...

Article

Bulkley, John Williams (03 November 1802–19 June 1888), teacher, administrator, and educational reformer, was born in Fairfield, Connecticut. The identities of his parents are unknown. Bulkley’s father arranged for his son’s common school education with an eye to mechanical pursuits, but young Bulkley’s inclinations gravitated toward more intellectual endeavors. About 1820 he moved to Clinton, New York, to prepare himself for Hamilton College. Focusing on the study of mathematics and the classics, he hoped to enter Hamilton as a sophomore. His health failed, however, and he was compelled to disrupt his educational ambitions and embark on a recuperative sea voyage. Bulkley never did return to college, but he had the satisfaction in 1853 of receiving an honorary master of arts from his intended alma mater....

Article

Byford, William Heath (20 March 1817–21 May 1890), gynecologist and advocate of medical education for women, was born in Eaton, Ohio, the son of Henry Byford, a mechanic, and Hannah Swain. Henry Byford moved his family to southwestern Indiana shortly after William’s birth and died there nine years later. Young William did odd jobs to help out, but about 1830 Hannah Byford had to move the family to her father’s farm in Crawford County, Illinois. During the next few years William often asked to be allowed to learn a trade to help support the family and improve his own prospects. He finally became apprenticed to a tailor, who moved away two years later. At this time William decided on medicine for his career, although he never mentioned the reason. His reading and studies in chemistry, physiology, and natural history may have steered him in this direction....

Article

Carter, James Gordon (07 September 1795–21 July 1849), educational reformer, was born in Leominster, Massachusetts, the son of James Carter and Betsy Hale, farmers. Carter’s boyhood summers were spent helping his parents eke out a meager income from the land. He received his basic elementary education in the town’s winter school. Carter’s days on the farm came to an end in 1812 when he enrolled in Groton Academy. He supported himself there and later at Harvard College by teaching at various district and singing schools and by lecturing on the history of Masonry. Upon graduating from college with honors in 1820, Carter opened a school in Lancaster, Massachusetts, devoted to helping Harvard students overcome academic difficulties. He continued to teach there for ten years. Carter had experience with students with special needs, for during his final year at Harvard he taught a class of disruptive older students, most of them sailors, in Cohasset. At the end of the term his pupils joined with the school committee in presenting him with a letter of thanks for his effectiveness as a disciplinarian and teacher....

Article

Clapp, Elsie Ripley (16 November 1879–28 July 1965), progressive educator and community school leader, was born in Brooklyn, New York, the daughter of William Clapp and Sarah Ripley. Her well-off family, then living in New York City’s fashionable Washington Square, sent her to Vassar College, 1899–1903. She transferred to Barnard College, Columbia University, where she received the B.A. degree in English in 1908. She also earned the M.A. degree in philosophy from Columbia University in 1909. She enrolled in a philosophy of education course under ...