You are looking at  1-13 of 13 articles  for:

  • federal government official x
  • education administrator (general) x
Clear All

Article

Bennett, Henry Garland (14 December 1886–22 December 1951), university and government administrator, was born near New Hope in Nevada County, Arkansas, the son of Thomas Jefferson Bennett, a blind evangelist, and Mary Elizabeth Bright. At the age of eight, Henry was enrolled in the primary department (laboratory school) at Ouachita College in Arkadelphia, where he remained until 1907, when he received the bachelor of arts degree. Following graduation, he earned a teaching certificate, taught in a business college in Texarkana, sold textbooks, and finally entered the public educational system in Oklahoma, subsequently holding teaching or administrative positions in Boswell, Choctaw County, and Hugo. Bennett secured a master’s degree from the University of Oklahoma in 1924, and Columbia University granted him the Ph.D. in 1926 for a dissertation entitled “The Coordination of the State Institutions of Higher Education in Oklahoma.” In Hugo, Bennett met Vera Pearl Connell, the daughter of a lawyer and federal judge who resided in Durant. The couple were married in January 1913; they had five children....

Article

Dennett, Tyler Wilbur (13 June 1883–29 December 1949), historian, government official, and college president, was born in Spencer, Wisconsin, the son of William Eugene Dennett, a Baptist preacher, and Roxena Tyler. He attended a small school in Pascaog, Rhode Island, where his parents moved shortly after he was born, and then the Friends School in Providence. His higher education included one year at Bates College in Maine and three years at Williams College in Massachusetts, where he was a scholarship student, edited the school paper, and played football....

Article

Eisenhower, Milton Stover (15 September 1899–02 May 1985), government official and university president, was born in Abilene, Kansas, the son of David Eisenhower, a mechanic at a local creamery, and Ida Stover. Of Pennsylvania Dutch stock, David raised his six sons to be fiercely independent while Ida nurtured them in the values of the River Brethren Church. “Opportunity is all about you,” was the Eisenhower creed. “Reach out and take it.”...

Article

Ford, Guy Stanton (09 May 1873–29 December 1962), historian, editor, and academic administrator, was born in Liberty Corners, Salem Township, Wisconsin, the son of Thomas D. Ford, a medical doctor, and Helen E. Shumway, a teacher. During Guy’s early childhood, his father’s drinking and business failures forced his mother, with her two sons, to move in with a series of relatives, eventually leading them to Sutherland, Iowa, in 1883. Shortly thereafter his father moved to Plainfield, Iowa, a town of about 300 people. In 1884 the family reunited in Plainfield. Thomas Ford was an extremely impractical man and the family lived in relative poverty throughout Guy’s years in Plainfield....

Image

Oliver O. Howard. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-B8172-3719).

Article

Howard, Oliver Otis (08 November 1830–26 October 1909), soldier, government official, and educator, was born in Leeds, Maine, the son of Rowland Bailey Howard and Eliza Otis, farmers. As a boy Howard worked in the company of a young black farmhand, an experience to which he later attributed his broadmindedness in racial matters. Howard graduated from Bowdoin College in 1850 and entered the U.S. Military Academy. He graduated from West Point in 1854, ranked fourth in his class. In 1855 Howard married Elizabeth Ann Waite; the couple had seven children. He first served at the federal arsenals in New York and Maine and then as an ordnance officer in Florida. In 1857 Howard returned to West Point to teach mathematics. The same year he experienced the religious conversion that would earn him such sobriquets as “the Christian Soldier.” His distaste for alcohol and profanity hardly endeared him to many of his fellows. ...

Article

Hunt, Henry Alexander, Jr. (10 October 1866–01 October 1938), educator and government official, was born in Sparta, Hancock County, Georgia, the son of Mariah and Henry Alexander Hunt, Sr., a tanner and farmer. Mariah, who exhibited some of the fundamentals of an education and had studied music, was a free woman of color; Henry Alexander was white. Available evidence suggests that the couple lived together before the Civil War but maintained separate households afterward. Henry was the fifth of eight racially mixed children. At age sixteen, having completed the formal education available to him in Hancock County, he followed his older sister and enrolled at Atlanta University. A popular campus leader, Hunt was captain of the baseball team, moot court judge, and president of the Phi Kappa Society. In addition to his college course, Hunt learned the builder’s trade and, during vacations, worked as a journeyman carpenter to earn money for his education. He graduated with a B.A. in 1890....

Image

James M. Landis. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-115254).

Article

Landis, James McCauley (25 September 1899–30 July 1964), federal administrator and Harvard Law School dean, was born in Tokyo, Japan, the son of Henry Mohr Landis and Emma Marie Stiefler, missionary-teachers. He first came to the United States at age thirteen for schooling. He graduated from Mercersburg Academy (1916), Princeton University (1921), and Harvard Law School (1924), attaining at each the highest levels of academic achievement and receiving one of Harvard’s first doctorates of juridical science....

Article

Morgan, Arthur Ernest (20 June 1878–15 November 1975), college president and first chairman of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), college president and first chairman of the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, the son of John Morgan, a surveyor and schoolteacher, and Anna Wiley, also a schoolteacher. Shortly after Arthur’s birth, the family moved to St. Cloud, Minnesota, where he grew up. If his father influenced Arthur to become an engineer, his mother influenced him to become hard working, disciplined, and self-righteous; to seek perfection in all his pursuits; and to hold others to his elevated personal standards. Morgan’s lifelong inability to tolerate behavioral and moral differences in associates and subordinates alike originated in childhood....

Image

Eugene Victor Rostow. Charcoal and pastel on colored paper, c.1968, by Gardner Cox. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution.

Article

Rostow, Eugene Victor Debs (25 August 1913–26 November 2002), legal scholar and government official, was born in Brooklyn, New York, to Victor A. Rostow, a metallurgical engineer, and Lillian Helman Rostow. His mother was the daughter of Russian-Jewish immigrants; his father, also Jewish, had emigrated from Russia in 1904. Both parents were ardent socialists and named their first child after ...

Article

Tugwell, Rexford Guy (10 July 1891–21 July 1979), academic and public official, was born in Sinclairville, New York, the son of Charles Tugwell, a successful businessman and banker, and Dessie Rexford. Tugwell received his B.S. (1915), M.A. (1916), and Ph.D. (1922) in economics at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School. In 1914 he married Florence E. Arnold; they had two children....