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Hauge, Gabriel Sylfest (07 March 1914–24 July 1981), economist, White House aide, and banker, was born in Hawley, Minnesota, the son of Soren Gabrielson Hauge, a Lutheran minister, and Anna B. Thompson. Hauge lived in the small town of Hawley until he enrolled in Concordia College at Moorhead, Minnesota, in 1931. Active in clubs as well as the student newspaper and radio station, he was elected class president each of his first three years. As a senior, he was student body president and class valedictorian....

Article

Heller, Walter Wolfgang (27 August 1915–15 June 1987), chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers, was born in Buffalo, New York, the son of Ernst Heller, a civil engineer, and Gertrude Warmburg. Both parents were German immigrants. In 1935 Heller received an A.B. from Oberlin College, where he earned election to Phi Beta Kappa. He did his graduate work in economics at the University of Wisconsin and received his M.A. in 1938 and a Ph.D. in 1941, specializing in finance and taxation. At the time, Heller received a Social Science Research Council grant to study income tax laws in thirty-one states, the District of Columbia, and Canada. Heller married Emily Karen Johnson, also a graduate student at the University of Wisconsin, in 1938. They had three children....

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Okun, Arthur Melvin (28 November 1928–23 March 1980), academic economist, policymaker, and presidential adviser, was born in Jersey City, New Jersey, the son of Louis Okun, a candy and tobacco wholesaler, and Rose Cantor. He attended Passaic (N.J.) High School and was an undergraduate at Columbia College in New York City, graduating in 1949 with a B.A. in economics. Seven years later he completed his Ph.D. at Columbia. Okun married Suzanne Grossman in 1951; they had three sons....

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Stein, Herbert (27 August 1916–08 September 1999), economist and policy advisor, was born in Detroit, Michigan, the son of David Stein, a Russian immigrant who was a mechanic at Ford Motor Company, and Jessie Segal Stein. When the Great Depression came, Stein's father spent some time working at General Electric in Schenectady, New York, and then was unemployed for a large part of the downturn. Stein graduated from high school at age fifteen and entered Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts, in the same year. He was a distinguished student and won the prestigious Wells Prize before he was twenty for scholarly work on Allied finances in World War I. As a scholarship student at Williams, Stein worked his way through, partly by washing dishes in the Sigma Phi fraternity house. Sigma Phi did not admit Jews as members; it was characteristic of Stein that he showed no resentment over this situation....