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de Lima, Agnes Abinun (05 August 1887–27 November 1974), progressive journalist, publicist, and educator, was born in Holywood, New Jersey, the daughter of Elias S. Abinun de Lima, a partner in D. A. de Lima and Sons, a banking firm, and Esther Abinun de Lima. Her parents were from Curacao. De Lima was raised in an upper-class home in New York City and Larchmont Manor, New York, and was taught by tutors and music teachers....

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Hannagan, Stephen Jerome (04 April 1899–05 February 1953), press agent, was born in Lafayette, Indiana, the son of William John Hannagan, a patternmaker, and Johanna Gertrude Enright. At age fourteen Hannagan began working at a local newspaper, the Lafayette Morning Journal, and continued working there while attending high school and then Purdue University, which he left in 1919 after two years (without graduating). Moving to Indianapolis he worked briefly for another newspaper and then for an advertising agency. His newspaper experiences taught him that journalists appreciated honest and accurate sources and a good human interest story....

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Malkiel, Theresa Serber (01 May 1874–17 November 1949), trade union leader, woman suffragist, publicist, and educator, was born in Bar, Russia. In 1891 she emigrated with her parents to the United States.

Soon after her arrival, Theresa Serber became a pioneer in the Jewish workers’ movement and socialist labor agitation in New York City. Employed in the garment industry, she joined the Russian Workingmen’s Club in 1892. In October 1894 she was among a group of seventy women who founded the Infant Cloak Makers Union (ICMU). Although it was a depression year, she and her associates decided not to accept wage cuts and deteriorating labor conditions any longer. Their action was front-page news. Eventually the ICMU became part of the Socialist Trades and Labor Alliance. In 1896, Serber was among the delegates to the first convention of the latter alliance; in 1899, along with many others, she broke with labor leader ...

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Michelson, Charles (18 April 1869?–08 January 1948), journalist and political publicist, was born in Virginia City, Nevada, the son of Samuel Michelson, a storekeeper, and Rosalie Przlubska, both emigrants from Prussia. His brother, older by seventeen years, was Albert Abraham Michelson, a Nobel Prize–winning physicist. Charles Michelson did not take to the studious ways of the rest of the family, left school as an adolescent, found odd jobs, and became “a frontier tramp,” a time he recalled as “the most perfect period of my life” (...

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Redpath, James (24 August 1833–10 February 1891), journalist and entertainment impresario, was born in Berwick-on-Tweed, Scotland, the son of Ninian Davidson Redpath, a teacher, and Maria Main. After being educated in his father’s academy, Redpath emigrated with his family to the United States in 1849 and soon found work as a reporter for ...

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Revell, Nellie McAleney (13 March 1873–12 August 1958), journalist and publicist, was born in Riverton, Illinois, the daughter of Hamilton H. McAleney and Elizabeth Evans. While Revell in later life referred to her father as editor and publisher of the Springfield (Ill.) Republican...

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Emmett Jay Scott. Courtesy of the Ohio Historical Society.

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Scott, Emmett Jay (13 February 1873–12 December 1957), educator and publicist, was born in Houston, Texas, the son of Horace Lacy Scott, a civil servant, and Emma Kyle. Scott attended Wiley College in Marshall, Texas, for three years but left college in 1890 for a career in journalism. Starting as a janitor and messenger for a white daily newspaper, the ...

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Tully, Jim (03 June 1891?–22 June 1947), writer and publicity agent, was born near St. Marys, Ohio, the son of James Dennis Tully, a laborer, and Marie B. Lawlor, a former teacher. The third of six children, Jim was never certain of the year of his birth. When he was about six years old, his mother died, and he was sent to live in a local Catholic orphanage, where he spent five or six years and received a rudimentary education....

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Ward, Herbert Dickinson (30 June 1861–18 June 1932), author and publicist, was born in Waltham, Massachusetts, the son of William Hayes Ward, a renowned Assyriologist and editor, and Ellen Maria Dickinson. Because his father traveled extensively, Ward attended numerous schools, but his father took a serious interest in his education and urged him to begin the study of Hebrew at the age of seven. When his mother died in 1873, Ward came under the care of his father’s two unmarried sisters, who managed the family household. Both his mother and father were descendants of old Calvinist families, and Ward was brought up in what he often claimed was the Puritan tradition of New England, though his father became a voice for liberal theology. To enhance his facility with modern languages, Ward was sent abroad to study twice in Germany and Switzerland. He completed a year of preparation at Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, before enrolling at Amherst College, his father’s alma mater. He graduated from Amherst in 1884, having developed an interest in geology. He was, however, persuaded by his father to complete a course of theological study before choosing his life’s work. He taught for one year at Catawba College in Newton, North Carolina, then enrolled at Union Theological Seminary for two years, completing his studies with a year at Andover Theological Seminary in 1888. While he continued his studies, he supported himself by writing Sunday school lessons and by doing research for the biblical department of the ...