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Ahern, Mary Eileen (01 October 1860–22 May 1938), librarian and editor, was born on a farm southwest of Indianapolis, Indiana, to William Ahern, a farmer, and Mary O’Neill, both Irish immigrants. In 1870 the family left the farm for Spencer, Indiana, where Mary Eileen graduated from high school in 1878. Following her graduation from Central Normal College in Danville, Indiana, in 1881, she worked as a teacher in the public schools of Bloomfield, Spencer, and Peru, Indiana, for eight years....

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Andrews, Regina (21 May 1901–05 February 1993), librarian and dramatist, was born Regina M. Anderson in the Hyde Park section of Chicago, Illinois, to Margaret Simons Anderson, a clubwoman and ceramics artist, and William Grant Anderson, an attorney. Regina grew up in an upper-middle-class family because of her father’s success as a defense attorney, which earned him the nickname “Habeas Corpus.” Her views about race were no doubt shaped by her father’s fighting for racial justice for his clients and his collaboration with the antilynching advocate ...

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Bostwick, Arthur Elmore (08 March 1860–13 February 1942), editor and librarian, was born in Litchfield, Connecticut, the son of David Elmore Bostwick, a physician, and Adelaide McKinley. Bostwick took advantage of the cultural assets in his hometown, reading periodicals from a neighbor’s private library, studying romance and classical languages, participating in music ensembles, and attending the Episcopal church where his mother was organist. His innate intellectual abilities were thus stimulated, laying the foundation for an active life of the mind. He attended Yale College, won the first Silliman Fellowship in physical science, graduated Phi Beta Kappa, and earned a B.A. in 1881 and a Ph.D. in physics in 1883. Aspiring to a college professorship, he declined an appointment as a Fellow at the Johns Hopkins University in favor of a temporary position at Yale but, when a permanent post was not forthcoming, he moved to Montclair, New Jersey, where he taught high school from 1884 to 1886. In 1885 Bostwick married Lucy Sawyer, with whom he had three children....

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Coggeshall, William Turner (06 September 1824–02 August 1867), journalist, state librarian, and diplomat, was born in Lewistown, Pennsylvania, the son of William C. Coggeshall, a coachsmith, and Eliza Grotz. At the age of eighteen he headed west and settled in Akron, Ohio. There he launched his career by starting the ...

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Dexter, Franklin Bowditch (11 September 1842–13 August 1920), educator, librarian, and historian, was born in Fairhaven, Massachusetts, the son of Rodolphus Williams Dexter, a businessman, and Mary Hathaway Taber. He attended the Williston Seminary in preparation for Yale College, in New Haven, Connecticut, from which he graduated with an A.B. in 1861. He received an A.M. in 1864 and a Litt.D. in 1902. He taught Greek at the Collegiate and Commercial Institute in New Haven from 1861 to 1863 before returning to work at Yale....

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Edmands, John (01 February 1820–17 October 1915), librarian, was born in Framingham, Massachusetts, the son of Jonathan Edmands and Lucy Nourse, farmers. Edmands attended a district school six months of the year until he was sixteen and then began a five-year apprenticeship to a carpenter. He entered Phillips Academy at Andover in 1841 and graduated in 1843, when he entered Yale College. In 1845–1846 Edmands, a junior, was assistant librarian of one of the three college literary societies, the Brothers in Unity. The literary societies maintained circulating libraries to supplement the rather limited collection in the college library. These were installed in wings near the college library. In return, the society libraries agreed to faculty supervision. A society librarian was an honorary position held by a senior who was elected by the members; each librarian had assistants from the lower classes. One of a society librarian’s duties was to help the members research debates and theses. After their move to a new library building, the three society librarians compiled up-to-date catalogs of their holdings. When Edmands was a junior, he compiled, with Samuel Richards, Yale’s first dictionary catalog under the supervision of Yale librarian Edward C. Herrick. The catalog was published without author credit in April 1846. This edition was larger and better organized than the Brothers’ previous catalog (1838)....

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Engel, Carl (21 July 1883–06 May 1944), composer, editor, and librarian, was born in Paris, France, the son of German parents Joseph C. Engel and Gertrude Seeger. Engel studied music, philosophy, and psychology at the Universities of Strasbourg and Munich. His musical training included individual instruction on the violin and piano and composition with Ludwig Thuille. The Engel family immigrated to the United States in 1905, settling in New York City. Engel quickly affiliated with the city’s young composers and musicians interested in new music and, later, their New Music Society of America, a group dedicated to the performance of American works....

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Folsom, Charles (24 December 1794–08 November 1872), librarian and editor, was born in Exeter, New Hampshire, the son of James Folsom and Sarah Gilman (occupations unknown). After preparation at Phillips Exeter Academy, Folsom entered Harvard College as a sophomore in 1810. He taught school at Sudbury during winter vacations and graduated from Harvard in 1813. He then taught at the academy in Hallowell, Maine, and in the fall of 1814 returned to Cambridge to study divinity. After giving that up, he made arrangements to study medicine, but instead, on the recommendation of Harvard president John T. Kirkland, sailed in 1816 to the Mediterranean on the 74-gun ship of the line ...

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Foss, Sam Walter (19 June 1858–26 February 1911), poet and librarian, was born in Candia, New Hampshire, the son of Dyer Foss and Polly Hardy, farmers. Foss’s mother died when he was four. He attended public or “common” schools, graduating from Portsmouth High School in 1877. He then matriculated at New Hampshire Conference Seminary and Female College in Tilton, which later became Tilton Academy, for one year. There he converted to Methodist Episcopalianism and earned a scholarship to attend Brown University. Because he worked to support himself, he was prevented from deep involvement in college life; nevertheless, he was elected class poet and a member of the ...

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Griswold, William McCrillis (09 October 1853–03 August 1899), librarian, bibliographer, and indexer, was born in Bangor, Maine, the son of Rufus Wilmot Griswold, a minister, editor, and writer, and Harriet Stanley McCrillis. Griswold was raised in Bangor, graduated from Phillips Exeter Academy in 1871, and attended Harvard University from 1871 to 1875. After graduating from Harvard he traveled in Europe for several years. In 1882 he married Anne Deering Merrill, with whom he had four children....

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Perkins, Frederic Beecher (27 September 1828–27 January 1899), editor, author, and librarian, was born in Hartford, Connecticut, the son of Thomas Clap Perkins, a lawyer, and Mary Foote Beecher. He entered Yale with the class of 1850 but left in 1848 to study law in his father’s Hartford office. He eventually graduated from Connecticut Normal School in 1852, and Yale conferred a master of arts degree on him in 1860 and listed him in its biographical records for the class of 1850....

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Plummer, Mary Wright (08 March 1856–21 September 1916), library educator and poet, was born in Richmond, Indiana, the daughter of Jonathan Wright Plummer, a businessman, and Hannah Bullard. She attended the Friends Academy, a Quaker school in Richmond, until 1873 when the family moved to Chicago, where her father was employed as a druggist. Except for a year spent at Wellesley College (1881–1882), she remained in Chicago with her family until 1887. In that year she left to attend the beginning class of the first library school in the United States, the School of Library Economy, organized by ...

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Sellers, Charles Coleman (16 March 1903–31 January 1980), biographer and librarian, was born in the Philadelphia suburb of Overbrook, Pennsylvania, the son of Horace Wells Sellers, an engineer and architect who worked on the restoration of Independence Hall in the 1920s, and Cora Wells, Horace Sellers's first cousin. Charles Sellers earned a B.A. from Haverford College in 1925 and an M.A. in American history from Harvard in 1926. Sellers's early biographical writings focused on atypical subjects, such as the eloquent, idiosyncratic nineteenth-century American evangelist ...

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Sibley, John Langdon (29 December 1804–09 December 1885), librarian and historian, was born in Union, Maine, the son of Jonathan Sibley, a physician, and Persis Morse. His father’s medical practice was more “extensive than gainful.” Sibley was educated at home, except for two years (1819–1821) at Phillips Exeter Academy, where he was provided free tuition and living expenses. He graduated from Harvard College in the class of 1825, having supported himself in college through a series of jobs, including work in the library. Following graduation he was appointed assistant librarian to librarian ...

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Smith, Lloyd Pearsall (06 February 1822–02 July 1886), librarian, publisher, and editor, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of John Jay Smith, a librarian, and Rachel Collins Pearsall. Following graduation from Haverford College at age fifteen, Smith became a bookkeeper and an accountant in the counting house of Waln & Leaming. In 1844 he married Hannah E. Jones, with whom he later adopted a daughter. While still at Waln & Leaming, Smith began publishing, among other works, ...

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Sonneck, Oscar George Theodore (06 October 1873–30 October 1928), music bibliographer, librarian, and editor, was born in Lafayette (now Jersey City), New Jersey, the son of George C. Sonneck, a civil engineer, and Julia Meyne. His father died while Oscar was still an infant, and his mother took him with her to Germany, where she had accepted a domestic position in Frankfurt-am-Main. His primary education took place at Kiel’s Gelehrtenschule, and he attended Gymnasium at Frankfurt. After a brief sojourn at the University of Heidelberg, he took up residence at the University of Munich, where he stayed until 1897. His musical education included the study of piano (with James Kwast), composition and orchestration (with Iwan Knorr) in Frankfurt; composition and musicology (with Melchior Ernest Sachs) in Munich; and conducting at the Sondershausen Conservatory under Carl Schröder. During his formative years he displayed a decidedly artistic disposition, composing and publishing a number of songs and piano pieces during the late 1890s and even putting out two volumes of poetry in German in 1895 and 1898....

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Spencer, Anne (06 February 1882–27 July 1975), poet, librarian, and teacher, was born Annie Bethel Scales Bannister in Henry County, near Danville, Virginia, the daughter of Joel Cephus Bannister, a former slave and saloon owner, and Sarah Louise Scales. The only child of divorced parents, at the age of eleven Annie was sent to Virginia Seminary in Lynchburg, where she excelled in literature and languages. After graduating in 1899 she taught for two years, then in 1901 married fellow student Edward Spencer and lived the rest of her life in Lynchburg....

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Thwaites, Reuben Gold (15 May 1853–22 October 1913), historian, editor, and librarian, was born in Dorchester, Massachusetts, the son of William George Thwaites and Sarah Bibbs, farmers. Thwaites’s family had emigrated from Yorkshire, England, three years before his birth. He attended school in Dorchester and in 1866 moved with his parents to Oshkosh, Wisconsin, where he helped them farm, taught school, and read the equivalent of a program of college courses. He became a reporter on the ...

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Timothy, Lewis (?– December 1738), printer and librarian, was born Lewis Timothée, probably in the Netherlands, of Huguenot parents (names unknown) who had fled France after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes in 1685. His wife Elizabeth Timothy (maiden name unknown) was almost certainly educated in Holland, and by the time of their arrival in Philadelphia from Rotterdam in 1731, the couple had been married long enough to have four children, aged nine and under. At the time of Timothy’s death he had six living children, and his wife was pregnant with another. Timothy settled in Philadelphia where, on 21 September 1731, he took the oath of allegiance to the British Crown. Fluent in several languages, he soon advertised that he would instruct students in French. Working as a journeyman printer for ...

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Ward, James Warner (05 June 1816–28 June 1897), librarian and author, was born in Newark, New Jersey, the son of William Ward and Sara Warner. Ward studied in the Boston Public Schools and then served for four years as freight checker in a shipping house in Salem, Massachusetts....