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Coit, Henry Augustus (20 January 1830–05 February 1895), clergyman and educator, was born in Wilmington, Delaware, the son of Joseph Howland Coit, a priest of the Episcopal church, and Harriet Jane Hard. He spent most of his childhood in Plattsburgh, New York, where his father was rector of Trinity Church. He attended ...

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Cutler, Timothy (31 May 1684–17 August 1765), clergyman and educator, was born in Charlestown, Massachusetts, the son of Major John Cutler, an anchorsmith and member of the General Court, and Martha Wiswall. Although his parents were well-to-do Jacobite sympathizers, Cutler was baptized as a Congregationalist, took his A.B. at Harvard College in 1701, and was admitted to membership in the Charlestown Congregational parish in 1705. It is not clear when he decided to enter the Congregational ministry, and since he was marked as a young man “of an high, lofty, & despotic mien,” he did not promise to be overly popular as a minister among provincial New Englanders. On the other hand, that same “lofty” superiority gave him a valuable credential in the eyes of an emerging New England merchant class that was anxious to match the social allure of Church of England missions with examples of an equally elite Congregational ministry. To that end, Cutler was called in 1709 to the Congregational parish of Stratford, Connecticut, where a Church of England mission (under the auspices of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel) had established a small but threatening presence in the Connecticut colony. He was ordained there on 11 January 1710. One year later, he married Elizabeth Andrew; they had eight children....

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De Koven, James (19 September 1831–19 March 1879), Episcopal priest and educator, was born in Middletown, Connecticut, the son of Henry Louis De Koven, a banker, and Margaret Sebor. He grew up in a large and affluent family in Brooklyn Heights, New York, and at an early age showed exceptional intellectual ability. De Koven graduated from Columbia College in 1851 and the General Theological Seminary in 1854. While in seminary he helped form a “ragged school” for poor boys that met on Sundays....

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Potter, Eliphalet Nott (20 September 1836–06 February 1901), educator and Episcopal clergyman, was born in Schenectady, New York, the son of Alonzo Potter, an Episcopal clergyman, and Sarah Maria Nott. When his father became bishop of the Diocese of Pennsylvania the family moved to Philadelphia, where the younger Potter attended the Protestant Episcopal Academy. He then entered the preparatory department of St. James College, Maryland, but rather than matriculate in college he chose to spend two years as a sailor. That experience led him to wish to do missionary work with sailors, but Potter’s father insisted that he enroll in college. He returned to Schenectady to enroll at Union College and graduated in 1861. He spent the next year studying theology at Berkeley Divinity School in Middletown, Connecticut. He then served brief stints as a chaplain in the Union army and as a missionary in the Lehigh valley of Pennsylvania before being named rector of the Church of the Nativity in South Bethlehem. He remained in that post for seven years (1862–1869), but in that time his career turned toward education....

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Russell, James Solomon (20 December 1857–28 March 1935), educator and priest, was born on the Hendrick Estate in Mecklenburg County near Palmer Springs, Virginia. His father, Solomon, and his mother, Araminta (maiden name unknown), both lived as slaves on adjoining properties, with the North Carolina state line between them. With the ambiguity of slave status following ...

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Wylie, Andrew (12 April 1789–11 November 1851), college president and pastor, was born in Washington, Pennsylvania, the son of Adam Wylie, an immigrant from county Antrim, Ireland, and a farmer in Fayette County in western Pennsylvania (his mother’s name is not known). A studious child, Wylie was educated at home and in local schools. At age fifteen he entered Jefferson College (Cannonsburg, Pa.), supporting himself in part by teaching in nearby schools. He graduated with honors in 1810 and was appointed tutor at the college. Two years later he became its president. He was licensed to preach in 1812 and ordained in the Presbyterian ministry in 1813. That year he married Margaret Ritchie; they had twelve children....