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Blankenburg, Lucretia Longshore (08 May 1845–29 March 1937), suffragist and reformer, was born near New Lisbon, Ohio, the daughter of Thomas Ellwood Longshore, a Quaker schoolteacher, and Hannah E. Myers, who also was from a Quaker family and who became the first woman doctor in Philadelphia. She was named for ...

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Sarah Platt Decker. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-111458).

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Decker, Sarah Sophia Chase Platt (01 October 1855–07 July 1912), clubwoman, suffragist, and community activist, was born in McIndoe Falls, Vermont, the daughter of Edwin Chase, a lumber dealer, paper manufacturer, and Baptist abolitionist known as the “Fighting Deacon,” and Lydia Maria Adams. The family moved to Holyoke, Massachusetts, when Sarah was quite young. She graduated from high school in Holyoke and while still in her teens became active in community work as a trustee of a fund to aid the poor. In 1875 she married a Holyoke merchant, Charles B. Harris....

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Shuler, Nettie Rogers (08 November 1865?–02 December 1939), suffragist and clubwoman, was born Antoinette Rogers in Buffalo, New York, the daughter of Alexander Rogers, a clerk for the American Express Company, and Julie Antoinette Houghtaling. Her father had emigrated from County Perth, Scotland. Her mother’s family had been in America since the Revolution. Nettie Rogers graduated from Buffalo Central High School. In 1887 she married Frank J. Shuler, a bookkeeper. They had one child, a daughter named Marjorie....

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Turner, Eliza L. Sproat (1826–20 June 1903), poet, suffragist, and women's club leader, poet, suffragist, and women’s club leader, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the daughter of a Vermont farmer who was later engaged in literary work, and Maria Lutwyche, who had immigrated to Philadelphia from Birmingham, England, around 1818. Very few details are known about her childhood, but her father apparently died when she was still a girl, and Eliza lived with her mother and brother. Though details of her education are unknown, she seems to have been well educated. She taught in the Philadelphia public schools for several years and at Girard College from 1850 to 1852....

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Welsh, Lilian (06 March 1858–23 February 1938), physician, educator, and suffragist, was born in Columbia, Pennsylvania, the daughter of Major Thomas Welsh and Annie Eunice Young. Her father served in the Mexican War in 1847, returned to civilian life, and then rejoined the military when the Civil War broke out. He had just risen to the rank of brigadier general, commanding a division of 4,500 men, when he took ill and died in 1863. Welsh graduated from Columbia High School at the age of fifteen as one of two young women making up the first graduating class. Between the years 1873 and 1881 she taught at the primary, elementary, and secondary levels and attended Millersville State Normal School in Pennsylvania and taught there. From 1881 to 1886 she served as the principal of Columbia High School. In 1885, finding no opportunities for women to advance their careers as superintendents of schools, she considered the two choices open to her for continuing her education: work for the A.B. at Bryn Mawr College, which had just opened that year, or proceed to the study of medicine for which at the time no college requirement was necessary. Interest in chemistry steered her on the latter course. She earned the M.D. from the Women’s Medical College of Pennsylvania in 1889 and pursued her studies further by working toward a Ph.D. in chemistry at the University of Zurich in the hopes of becoming a research scientist. While in Zurich, she met Dr. ...