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Allen, Glover Morrill (08 December 1879–15 February 1942), mammalogist and ornithologist, was born in Walpole, New Hampshire, the son of Nathaniel Glover Allen, a minister, and Harriet Ann Schouler Allen. His father, who was 68 when his son was born, retired in 1885, at which time the family moved to Newton, Massachusetts. He died when his son was ten. Allen attended the local public schools and Newton High School and then entered Harvard, becoming a member of Phi Beta Kappa in his junior year and graduating magna cum laude in 1901. The early natural history interests Allen had evinced from boyhood prompted him to concentrate in botany, zoology, and foreign languages. His first major publication, ...

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Anthony, Harold Elmer (05 April 1890–29 March 1970), mammalogist, museum curator, and author, was born in Beaverton, Oregon, the son of Alfred Webster Anthony and Anabel Klink. His father, a mining engineer and amateur ornithologist and collector, encouraged the boy’s interests in natural history. Anthony was an avid hunter, as were other lads in his community, but he early evinced an interest in preserving small mammal and bird skins for further study. Educated in the local public schools of Portland, Oregon, Anthony attended Pacific University in Forest Grove, Oregon, for one year (1910–1911)....

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Hamilton, William John, Jr. (11 December 1902–17 July 1990), mammalogist, naturalist, and educator, was born in Corona, Queens, New York, the son of William John Hamilton and Charlotte Richardson. His interest in nature was kindled in boyhood by a Sunday school teacher who gave him a plant to care for when Hamilton was seven. He was soon involved in gardening (which would remain a major avocation all his life), bird watching, muskrat trapping, and kindred activities. In his teens, he raised needed income by supplying timber rattlesnakes to the New York Zoological Society’s Bronx Zoo and moth cocoons to a shop on lower Fifth Avenue in New York City....

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Jackson, Hartley Harrad Thompson (19 May 1881–20 September 1976), mammalogist and government official, was born in Milton, Wisconsin, the son of Harrad Jackson and Mary Thompson, English immigrants who settled in that state, and the only one of their eight children who was born in the United States. Educated in the local schools, he developed an interest in birds and later in mammals, the latter of which would become the focus of his lifelong research. He soon began a personal collection of study skins. At the age of fourteen he met Ludwig Kumlien, a prominent Wisconsin naturalist and Arctic explorer, who gave Jackson useful guidance in his natural history pursuits. His first article, on screech owls, was published in ...

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Edgar Alexander Mearns. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-115922).

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Mearns, Edgar Alexander (11 September 1856–01 November 1916), ornithologist, mammalogist, and army surgeon, was born in Highland Falls, New York, the son of Alexander Mearns and Nancy Carswell. He attended Donald Highland Institute in Highland Falls. When still very young, he grew interested in local plants and animals and planned a book on the natural history of the area, which he was unable to complete at the time. Many years later, in 1898, he did publish a fifty-page account of some of his conclusions as “A Study of the Vertebrate Fauna of the Hudson Highlands, with observations on the Mollusca, Crustacea, Lepidoptera, and the Flora of the Region” in the ...

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Miller, Gerrit Smith, Jr. (06 December 1869–24 February 1956), mammalogist, was born in Peterboro, New York, the son of Gerrit Smith Miller, cattle breeder, and Susan Dixwell. The elder Miller, the grandson of noted abolitionist Gerrit Smith, is credited with inventing the American game of football and organizing the first American team, the Oneida Club, in Boston in 1862. Miller’s maternal aunt Fanny Dixwell was the wife of ...

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Tate, George Henry Hamilton (30 April 1894–24 December 1953), mammalogist and naturalist, was born in London, England, the son of Septimus George Tate, a railroad administrator, and Elizabeth Hamilton. His family lived in Canada from 1895 to 1902, after which they spent a year in the United States. In 1903 they returned to England, remaining until 1912, when they came back to the United States to stay. The family resided in New York City, and Tate’s father worked in his railroad company offices there. The younger Tate attended primary schools in England, Canada, and the United States, worked as a telegraph operator for the Western Union Company on Long Island from 1912 to 1914, and then returned to England to become an infantry and later an engineering officer in the British army during World War I. He was a student at the Imperial College of Science and Technology in London in 1918–1919, then spent much of the year 1919–1920 managing a lime plantation in Dominica, British West Indies. In the autumn of 1920, he was an instructor at the Newton Academy in New Jersey....

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Young, Stanley Paul (30 October 1889–15 May 1969), mammalogist, wildlife biologist, and scientific administrator, was born in Astoria, Oregon, the son of Swedish immigrants Benjamin Youngquist and Christina Swanson. His father, who had been a cabin boy on the Confederate ship Alabama, later a member of the U.S. Merchant Marine, a sugar plant foreman, and owner of several Pacific coast fish canneries, changed the family name to Young when his son was a boy. Young’s mother died when he was twelve, his father when he was twenty-two. He was raised by his older married sister Carol....