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Anthony, John Gould (17 May 1804–16 October 1877), conchologist, was born in Providence, Rhode Island, the son of Joseph Anthony and Mary Gould. As a child he became interested in natural history, particularly in marine mollusks, the study of which absorbed him all his life and led to his appointment as first curator of conchology in the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard. Before that he was an accountant by profession and a collector at heart....

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Gould, Augustus Addison (23 April 1805–15 September 1866), physician and conchologist, was born in New Ipswich, New Hampshire, the son of Nathaniel Duren Gould, a music teacher and conductor, and Sally Andrews Prichard. Taking charge of the family farm at age fifteen, he prepared for college and entered Harvard University in 1821, receiving an A.B. degree in 1825. Thereafter, he served two years as tutor with the McBlair family in Baltimore County, Maryland. Deciding on a medical career, Gould studied with physicians ...

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Stearns, Robert Edwards Carter (01 February 1827–27 July 1909), conchologist, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Charles Stearns, a bank clerk, and Sarah Carter. Stearns developed a love of natural history during his youth, an interest he shared with his father. After attending the Fort-hill School in Boston, he received mercantile training and followed in his father’s footsteps....

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Tryon, George Washington, Jr. (20 May 1838–05 February 1888), conchologist and naturalist, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Edward K. Tryon, a businessman involved in the manufacture and trade of sporting firearms, and Adeline Savitd. Tryon showed an early interest in natural history and in the collection of specimens, especially shells. Studious and methodical, he showed skill at identifying and curating when only seven. His education began at home and at private schools; at age twelve he entered Friends’ Central School in Philadelphia, attending for three years. This marked the end of his formal education, although he subsequently learned French, German, and music from private tutors. His interest in literature and music was lifelong—strong enough for him to write a comic opera, manage an orchestra, and edit, publish, and arrange music—but these activities did not alter his intent to be a natural historian. He was persuaded to enter the family business in 1857, but he left in 1868 to devote the rest of his life to conchology, becoming one of the most knowledgeable American authorities in that growing field....