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Crocker, William (27 January 1874–11 February 1950), plant physiologist, was born on a farm in Montville, Ohio, the son of Charles David Crocker, a farmer and carpenter, and Catherine House. He left home at age fourteen and attended the preparatory school of Baldwin University in Berea, Ohio. From there he went to Illinois Normal College, graduating in 1898; his next period of formal education was at the University of Illinois, from which he received a B.A. in 1902 and an M.A. in 1903. In the ten years preceding his M.A., Crocker taught at various country schools, and after graduating he took a teaching job in biology at Northern Illinois Normal School. This lasted two years, and he then turned to further graduate studies at the University of Chicago, receiving a Ph.D. in 1906. His principal professor at Chicago was ...

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Goddard, David Rockwell (03 January 1908–09 July 1985), plant physiologist, was born in Carmel, California, the son of Pliny E. Goddard, an anthropologist, and Alice Rockwell, a teacher. His early life was spent in Leonia, New Jersey, where he attended public schools. In 1922 Goddard was stricken with influenza and, quarantined for weeks in his father’s library, was inspired to read the works of great authors. This, combined with his studies to prepare for examinations, taught him the valuable lessons that he could learn outside the classroom. When he was fifteen, his father bought a secondhand greenhouse that he and his brothers assembled. Growing plants and flowers greatly interested the young Goddard, and he spent most of his spare time growing plants and selling nursery stock....

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Hoagland, Dennis Robert (02 April 1884–05 September 1949), plant physiologist, was born in Golden, Colorado, the son of Charles Breckenridge Hoagland and Lillian May Burch, occupations unknown. He spent his first eight years in his birthplace, but then the family moved to Denver, where Hoagland graduated from East Denver High School in 1903. He began his education as a chemistry major at Stanford University and received the A.B. in 1907. In 1908 he took a position as assistant chemist in the Laboratory of Animal Nutrition at the University of California, Berkeley, and in 1910 he became an assistant chemist in the Food and Drug Administration of the Department of Agriculture. Hoagland was awarded a graduate scholarship in animal biochemistry at the University of Wisconsin in 1912 and graduated with the M.A. in 1913. At Wisconsin, he worked with ...