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Berry, Edward Wilber (10 February 1875–20 September 1945), paleobotanist, teacher, and university administrator, was born in Newark, New Jersey, the son of Abijah Conger Berry and Anna Wilber. Berry is a classic example of the self-trained scientist. He received elementary courses in biology and botany in high school that roused his interest in nature. Berry completed the three-year course in two years and finished his formal education at thirteen. From 1890 to 1897 he worked for a cotton goods company, rising from stock boy to traveling salesman. Berry then entered the newspaper world as business manager for the ...

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Lesquereux, Leo (18 November 1806–25 October 1889), teacher, student of mosses, and paleobotanist, was born in Fleurier, Switzerland, the son of V. Aimé Lesquereux, who made watchsprings, and Marie Anne (maiden name unknown). At age ten, while climbing near his home, the young Lesquereux suffered a major fall; after being in a coma for several weeks, he was found to have lost hearing in one ear. At age thirteen he was sent to Neuchâtel to begin an academic course. He was a classmate of ...

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White, David (01 July 1862–07 February 1935), paleobotanist and geologist, was born Charles David White in Wayne County, New York, the son of Asa Kendrick White and Elvira Foster, farmers. Throughout his professional career, White never employed his first name in publications nor was it used by his colleagues. White grew up on a farm just north of the Finger Lakes region of New York. A Dutch laborer on the farm interested him in plants. With the aid of a county scholarship and by teaching school, he was able to attend Cornell and graduate with a bachelor’s degree in 1886. White’s senior thesis on fossil plants from the Devonian period (413–365 million years ago) found around Ithaca, New York, included excellent drawings of specimens....

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Wieland, George Reber (24 January 1865–18 January 1953), paleobotanist and vertebrate paleontologist, was born in Boalsburg, Pennsylvania, the son of Washington Frederick Wieland and Margaret Reber, farmers. Wieland was a student in the preparatory department of Pennsylvania State College (later Pennsylvania State University) in 1882–1883 and 1887–1888. He became a college-level student in 1888 and completed his B.S. in chemistry in 1893. During his college years he developed a lasting interest in the origin and evolution of flowering plants. Prior to his graduation, he taught in country schools and, from 1890 to 1892, in secondary schools in Tennessee. He married Edla Kristina Andersson in Nykoping, Sweden, in 1891; they had two sons. He studied geology at Göttingen, Germany, in 1894. For the next two years he taught in secondary schools in Lincoln, Nebraska, and Chester, Pennsylvania. In 1896 and 1897 he collected fossil reptiles for the vertebrate paleontologist ...