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Rautenstrauch, Walter (07 September 1880–03 January 1951), engineering educator and industrial engineer, was born in Sedalia, Missouri, the son of Julius Rautenstrauch and Anna Nichter. He graduated with a B.S. from the University of Missouri in 1902 and was awarded his M.S. from the University of Maine in 1903. Rautenstrauch also completed a year of advanced study at Cornell University. In 1904 he married Minerva Babb; the couple had two children. From 1904 to 1906 Rautenstrauch was assistant professor at Cornell; in 1906 he moved to the Columbia School of Engineering, where he became a full professor of mechanical engineering in 1907. In 1918 he offered a course in industrial engineering. By 1920 Rautenstrauch’s interest in the field and his administrative influence persuaded President ...

Article

Taylor, Frederick Winslow (20 March 1856–21 March 1915), engineer and industrial manager, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Franklin Taylor, a lawyer, and Emily Winslow. Taylor’s parents, members of Quaker merchant families, were independently wealthy and devoted to the arts and philanthropy; their children had private tutors and attended exclusive schools. The Taylors’ contact with other wealthy Philadelphians included ties to the family of Edward W. Clark, the city’s most important investment banker. Frederick was particularly close to Clark’s son, Clarence M. Clark, who became his tennis partner (Taylor and Clark won the U.S. Lawn Tennis Association doubles championship in 1881), brother-in-law, and business adviser. Taylor’s later career as a management theorist and publicist was possible because of a fortune he made from Clark-inspired investments in West Virginia coal mines and other enterprises in the 1890s and afterward....