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Keeler, Clyde Edgar (11 April 1900–22 April 1994), biologist, educator, and cultural historian, was born in Marion, Ohio, the son of Anthony Sylvester Keeler, a watchmaker and teacher, and Amanda Jane Dumm Keeler, a teacher. Growing up in Marion, with nearby farmlands, Keeler had early opportunities—on his milk and paper routes—to observe nature, and he attributed the launching of his biomedical career to childhood observations of field mice. Keeler graduated from Denison University (Granville, Ohio) in 1923 with a zoology major and enough credits for a master’s degree; he lacked only the research component, which he completed in 1925 at Harvard. Cited as “the school artist” in the yearbook, he was Phi Beta Kappa, president of the Zoology Club, and captain of the cross country team. He was also a member of the Student Army Training Corps (for World War I) and, after the war, the Reserve Officers Training Corps; he eventually rose to the rank of major in the U.S. Army Officers Reserve Corps....

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McCrady, Edward (19 September 1906–27 July 1981), biologist and university president, was born in Canton, Mississippi, the son of Edward McCrady, an Episcopal priest, and Mary Ormond Tucker. Descended from an old South Carolina family distinguished in law, politics, religion, and science, McCrady graduated with a degree in classics from the College of Charleston in 1927. In 1928 he joined the staff of the Highlands Art Museum (N.C.) after the Gibbes Museum of Art in Charleston sent him to do graduate work in Japanese at Columbia University. Though tempted to study both theology and medicine, he switched to biology for his master’s degree, which he received from the University of Pittsburgh in 1930. That same year he married Edith May Dowling, whom he had met during his summer studies at Woods Hole, Massachusetts. They had four children....

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Morse, Edward Sylvester (18 June 1838–20 December 1925), biologist and expert on Japanese culture, was born in Portland, Maine, the son of Jonathan Kimball Morse and Jane Seymour Beckett. His father was a partner in a firm that dealt in beaver furs and buffalo robes, and his mother was said to be “interested in all branches of science.” As a boy Morse collected shells, and at the age of seventeen he joined the Portland Society of Natural History. At the encouragement of other naturalists in the society, Morse began to study the land snails of his state and to correspond with leading American conchologists. After attending preparatory schools he worked as a draftsman in the locomotive shops of the Maine Central Railroad, presumably to save for college. There he demonstrated a fine ability in sketching and creating line drawings, which he used to advantage in his later publications....