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Callimachos, Panos Demetrios (04 December 1879–13 October 1963), Greek Orthodox priest and journalist, was born in Madytos, Dardanelles, Turkey, the son of Panagiotis Paximadas and Grammatiki (maiden name unknown). Following studies in Constantinople and Smyrna, Callimachos received his doctorate in theology from the University of Athens in 1902, only four years after Greece was defeated in its war with Turkey....

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Netsvetov, Jacob (1804–26 July 1864), Native American Orthodox priest and missionary in Alaska, was born Iakov Igorovich Netsvetov, the son of Igor Netsvetov, a Russian fur trader, and Maria Alekseeva, an Unangan Aleut from the island of Atka in the Aleutian chain. Hence he was a creole, of Native American and Russian blood. His birthplace was either Atka or the island of Saint George in the Bering Sea, but he was raised on the latter island, where his father worked for the Russian-American Company, becoming a company manager there in 1818. Jacob was educated at home in his early years. In 1823 he entered the seminary in Irkutsk, Siberia. Two years later he married a Siberian creole woman, Anna Simeonovna; they had no children. In 1826 he graduated from the seminary with certificates in history and theology. On 4 March 1828, while still in Irkutsk, he was ordained to the priesthood in the Russian Orthodox church, making him the first Native American Orthodox priest....

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Trifa, Valerian Dionisie (28 June 1914–28 January 1987), archbishop of the Rumanian Orthodox Episcopate of America, was born in Câmpeni, Romania, the son of Dionisie Trifa and Macinica Motora, peasants.

Trifa graduated from the Chişinău Theological School in Bessarabia in 1935. After briefly working in his uncle’s newspaper business, he studied at the University of Jassy (1935) and then he went to the University of Bucharest (1936–1938) to begin doctoral studies. He became the president of the University Student Center and was associated with the Legion of the Archangel Michael popularly known as the “Iron Guard.” Both groups were strongly nationalistic and anti-Semitic. They opposed the rule of King Carol II. The government began to suppress the Legionnaire movement in 1938, and Trifa fled to Berlin, where he continued his studies at the University of Berlin (1939–1940). With the collapse of the regime of King Carol II in 1940, army general Ion Antonescu and the Legion assumed joint control of Romania. Trifa returned and became president of the National Union of Romanian Christian Students. The coalition between Antonescu and the students collapsed, however, early in 1941. At a demonstration on 20 January 1941, Trifa spoke against the Antonescu regime. Some subsequently claimed that he also advocated a Legionnaire state and the extermination of the Jews. In any case, persecution of the Jews followed immediately. While reports vary, it seems that about 500 Jews were killed. Survivors accused Trifa of having played a major role in the killings....

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Veniaminov, Ivan (26 or 27 Aug. 1797–31 March 1879), bishop of the Russian Orthodox church in Alaska and metropolitan of Moscow, was born Ioann Popov in Anginskoe (or Anga), Siberia, the son of Eusebius Popov, a church warden (or sacristan), and Thekla (maiden name unknown). His family was very poor. At the age of nine he began studies in the theological seminary at nearby Irkutsk. When he was seventeen years old, the principal of the seminary changed his last name to Veniaminov in honor of the late Bishop Benjamin, who had assumed the Russian form of his name at his ordination as bishop and whom the gifted student had spent much time visiting. When he was nineteen, seminarian Veniaminov married a local priest’s daughter named Catherine; the couple had seven children. In 1821 he was ordained as a priest and assigned as second priest in a parish in Irkutsk. Although happy with his life in the parish there, in 1823 he responded to his bishop’s request for volunteers as missionaries to Alaska. He later wrote that after hearing about the Aleuts living there from an old adventurer, “I began to burn with desire to go to such a people!” He and his family left for Alaska in May 1823....