1-20 of 54 results  for:

  • Christian: Lutheran x
Clear all

Article

Acrelius, Israel (04 December 1714–25 April 1800), Lutheran clergyman and author, was born in Öster-Âker, Sweden, the son of Johan Acrelius, a pastor, and Sara Gahm. At the age of twelve he entered the University of Uppsala, where he trained for the ministry and received his ordination in 1743. Acrelius then served as a domestic chaplain until 1745, when he became the pastor of Riala, Kulla, and Norra Ljusterö....

Article

Bachman, John (04 February 1790–24 February 1874), clergyman and naturalist, was born in Rhinebeck, New York, the son of Jacob Bachman, a farmer, and Eva (surname unknown but probably Shop). During his boyhood on a farm in Rensselaer County, New York, Bachman developed a keen interest in natural history and read many books on the subject. Around 1803, after tutoring by the local Lutheran minister, Anton T. Braun, Bachman entered college, evidently somewhere in Philadelphia, but a severe attack of tuberculosis compelled him to leave before he earned a degree. While recuperating, Bachman decided to enter the Lutheran ministry, and by 1810, after briefly studying theology with Braun and then with another minister in the local area, he had returned to Philadelphia for advanced training. During that time he also taught school. Upon the death of Braun in 1813, Bachman assumed his former mentor’s pastorate. Soon troubled again by tuberculosis, he decided to move to a warmer climate and accepted a call from St. John’s Lutheran Church, in Charleston, South Carolina, where he assumed his duties early in 1815....

Article

Berkenmeyer, Wilhelm Christoph (07 April 1687–10 October 1751), colonial Lutheran minister, was born in Bodenteich, Germany, the son of Georg Berkkenmeyer, a minister, and Anna Engel Rühden Pöppelbaum. His mother died eighteen months later, and his father married again in 1690. In 1708, the year after his father’s death, Berkenmeyer entered the Protestant University at Altdorf, a center of Lutheran orthodoxy, from which he graduated in 1712. Pastoral candidates exceeded vacancies throughout Germany, and like many candidates, he found work as a children’s tutor. In November 1722 he was appointed lay chaplain at the Hamburg city prison. In 1725 he accepted a call from the Amsterdam consistory to become pastor of the Dutch Lutheran churches in New York and New Jersey, even though he did not yet know the language. He was ordained on 25 May in Amsterdam....

Article

Renate Wilson and George Fenwick Jones

Boltzius, Johann Martin (15 December 1703–19 November 1765), Lutheran minister, was born in Forst, a small Lusatian town in Saxony, to a well-established artisan family. His name was also spelled Bolzius. Boltzius was introduced by an uncle, Johann Müller, to the influential network of Halle Pietism, an evangelical movement of religious and social reform. Baron von Burgdorf, a member of the nobility supporting Pietist reform, offered Boltzius a stipend to Friedrich University at Halle. He studied theology from 1727 to 1731 under two eminent Pietist teachers, Paul Anton and Joachim Justus Breithaupt. He was guided by the Pietist search for salvation and by the model of an active and searching Christian life set by August Hermann Francke; like most Pietists, he experienced an emotionally intense conversion....

Article

Dahl, Theodor Halvorson (02 April 1845–18 January 1923), Lutheran clergyman and church leader, was born in Baastad, Mellem Borgesyssel, Norway, the son of Halvor Thoreson Smaadal and Anne Maastad. After attending a Latin school in Christiania from 1862 to 1865 he emigrated to America. He attended Augustana Theological Seminary (located at that time in Paxton, Illinois), a school of the Scandinavian Augustana Lutheran church. He graduated with a C.T. (Candidatus Theologiae) in 1867 after two years of study. That year he was ordained to the ministry by T. N. Hasselquist, president of both the seminary and the synod, and he married Rebekka Oline Gjertsen; they had several children....

Article

Dietrichson, Johannes Wilhelm Christian (04 April 1815–14 November 1883), Lutheran clergyman, was born in Fredrikstad, Norway, the son of Fredrik Dietrichson, a military officer, and Karen Sophie Henriette Radich. The Dietrichson family, originally from Denmark, was of the upper class, the so-called officialdom. In 1837 he completed studies for a theological degree at the Royal Frederick University in Christiania (later the University of Oslo) and the following year passed the “practical” examination that qualified him to serve as a pastor in the Church of Norway. During his academic years he was influenced by Grundtvigianism, a churchly movement of Danish origin, which, in addition to the more influential Haugean lay movement, was part of the religious ferment within the Church of Norway during the nineteenth century. During the years preceding his ordination he was engaged in teaching and studying and served as assistant to the prison chaplain in Christiania. In November 1839 Dietrichson married Jørgine Laurentze Broch, who died a year and a half later, a few weeks after giving birth to a son. In June 1846, while on his trip to Norway, he married Charlotte Josine Omsen Müller. They had two children....

Article

Douglas, Lloyd Cassel (27 August 1877–13 February 1951), minister and novelist, was born in Columbia City, Indiana, the son of Alexander Jackson Douglas, a minister and educator, and Sarah Jane Cassel, a teacher. His father had been a farmer, school superintendent, lawyer, and state senator before becoming pastor of a rural Lutheran church; his mother smothered young Lloyd with “maternal supervision,” and he grew up a solemn and sheltered child. By working at various jobs, especially playing the organ, Douglas put himself through Wittenberg College in Springfield, Ohio, and the Hamma Divinity School, a Lutheran seminary connected with Wittenberg, receiving his B.A. in 1900 and his B.D. in 1903....

Article

Eielsen, Elling (19 September 1804–10 January 1883), Lutheran lay preacher and pastor, was born on the Sundve farm in Voss, Norway, the son of Eiel Ingebrigtsen Sundve, a farmer and teacher, and Anna Ellingsen Sundsvaal. His parental home was permeated by the pietistic spirit of Haugeanism, the revival movement within the Church of Norway named after Hans Nielsen Hauge. Hauge was a lay preacher who traveled throughout the country proclaiming a message of repentance and conversion, also stressing the life of holiness and obedience that follows faith. Hauge was extremely critical of the clergy, indicting them for worldliness and neglect of their spiritual responsibilities. He met with opposition from governmental and ecclesiastical authorities since the holding of conventicles by a layman was forbidden by law. A nationwide revival resulted from Hauge’s activity....

Article

Empie, Paul Chauncey (10 February 1909–01 September 1979), Lutheran clergy, official in relief work, and ecumenist, was born of French Huguenot ancestry in St. Johnsville, New York, the son of Charles G. Empie, a Lutheran pastor, and Grace Dieffendorf. He graduated from Muhlenberg College in 1929 with an A.B. degree and from the Lutheran Technological Seminary in Philadelphia in 1932 with a B.D. degree. Empie had married Katharine Goodwin Smith in 1931; they had six children. After serving as the pastor of a Lutheran congregation in Philadelphia for five years (1932–1937), he became the superintendent of the Lutheran Home for Orphans and Aged in Philadelphia and then the secretary for stewardship of the Ministerium of Pennsylvania of the United Lutheran Church in America for three years (1941–1944)....

Article

Esbjörn, Lars Paul (16 October 1808–02 July 1870), founder of the Swedish Lutheran church in America, was born in Delabo (Delsbo), Hälsingland, Sweden, the son of Lars Esbjörn, a tailor, and Karin Lindstrom Paulson. His mother died when he was five, and his father died two years later. He was then brought up by an old woman in his village named Stina. When he was twelve, she sent him to school in Hudiksvall. He was musically gifted, and his foster mother encouraged him to earn money by singing in people’s homes and for special occasions in the villages. In 1825 he went to the Gymnasium in Gävle (Gefle), where he studied for three years before entering the Academy in Uppsala. In 1831 he married Amalia Maria Louisa Planting- Gyllenbåga; they had six children....

Article

Falckner, Daniel (25 November 1666–1741?), minister, author, and communitarian, was born near Zwickau in Langen-Reinsdorf (now Reinsdorf), Saxony, the son of Daniel Falckner. (His mother’s name is unknown.) Both his father and grandfather were Lutheran clergymen. While pursuing theological education, the young Daniel Falckner was closely associated in religious conventicles at Erfurt with August Hermann Francke, a noted leader of the Pietist reform movement within German Protestantism....

Article

Falckner, Justus (22 November 1672–late 1723), Lutheran clergyman, was born in Langen-Reinsdorf (now Reinsdorf), Saxony, the son of Daniel Falckner, a Lutheran pastor. His mother’s name is unknown. Justus Falckner studied theology after 1693 at the University of Halle, the citadel of German pietism under the influence of August Hermann Francke. Falckner’s dedication is attested by the fervent hymns he composed at Halle, one of which, “Auf, ihr Christen, Christi Glieder” (“Rise, O Children of Salvation”), is still included in German and American hymnals....

Article

Fritschel, Conrad Sigmund (02 December 1833–26 April 1900), Lutheran pastor, educator, and church leader, was born in Nürnberg, Germany, the son of Martin Heinrich Fritschel, a merchant, and Katharine Esther Kässler. In 1850 he enrolled in the Missionary Institute at Nürnberg, and when the school moved to Neuendettelsau in 1853, he followed, completing his work in 1854. At the Missionary Institute he was strongly influenced by teachers Friedrich Bauer and Wilhelm Löhe, and under their direction he prepared for ministry among the German immigrants in America. On 23 April 1854 Fritschel was ordained in Hamburg as pastor for an immigrant group. He arrived in Dubuque, Iowa, on 28 July 1854, where he began his ministry....

Article

Fritschel, Gottfried Leonhard Wilhelm (19 December 1836–13 July 1889), pastor, educator, and church leader, was born in Nürnberg, now in Germany, the son of Martin Heinrich Fritschel, a merchant, and Katharina Esther Kässler. At his father’s request, Fritschel first prepared for a career in business, but he eventually followed his older brother ...

Article

Fry, Franklin Clark (30 August 1900–06 June 1968), Lutheran pastor, church executive, and ecumenist, was born in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, the son of Franklin Foster Fry and Minnie Clark McKeown. Both his father and his grandfather Jacob Fry were nationally prominent pastors and church statesmen....

Article

Grabau, Johannes Andreas August (18 March 1804–02 June 1879), Lutheran pastor and church leader, was born in Olvenstadt, Germany, the son of Johannes Andreas Grabau and Anna Dorothea Jericho, farmers. He studied theology at the University of Halle for five years, graduating in 1829. He then taught school until 1834 when he was ordained in Erfurt and received a church position there....

Article

Graebner, Theodore Conrad (23 November 1876–14 November 1950), pastor, editor, and author, was born in Watertown, Wisconsin, the son of August L. Graebner, a professor at Northwestern College, and Anna Schaller. After prepatory training at Martin Luther College in New Ulm, Minnesota, he graduated from Concordia College in Ft. Wayne, Indiana, in 1894. He studied for the Lutheran ministry at Concordia Seminary in St. Louis, Missouri, graduating in 1897. After teaching German and history at Walther College in St. Louis from 1897 to 1900, he accepted a position as instructor of biology and English at the Lutheran Ladies’ Seminary in Red Wing, Minnesota. He married Selma Brohm in 1900; they had five children. He taught at the seminary from 1900 to 1906 and was ordained there on 25 May 1902 in the Norwegian Lutheran church....

Article

Hartwick, John Christopher (06 January 1714–17 July 1796), Lutheran pastor, was born in Molschleben, Duchy of Saxe-Gotha (later part of Germany), the son of Andrew Hartwick. His mother’s name is not known. Hartwick studied at the University of Halle, having matriculated there in 1739. In response to a call from several New York congregations directed through a London pastor, the Lutheran Ministerium of Hamburg, Germany, recruited him for service in America. He was ordained in London in November 1745....

Article

Hasselquist, Tuve Nilsson (02 March 1816–04 February 1891), Lutheran pastor, educator, and church leader, was born in Hasslaröd, Ousby Parish, Sweden, the son of Nils Tufvasson and Lissa Svensdotter, farmers. Graduating from Lund University in Sweden in 1835, he was ordained a Lutheran pastor in 1839 and served several parishes in Sweden....

Article

Hazelius, Ernest Lewis (06 September 1777–20 February 1853), Lutheran minister and educator, was born in Neusalz, Province of Silesia, Prussia, the son of Eric Hazelius, a watchmaker, and Christiana Brahtz. Hazelius’s Swedish father originally studied to be a Lutheran pastor, as had several generations of his family before him, but eventually decided he did not have a call to such ministry. He traveled, settled in Neusalz, married Moravian Christiana Brahtz, and converted to her faith. Their son Ernest was raised in that tradition. Ernest’s parents took him to Herrnhut, the cradle of Moravianism, when he was five to be blessed by an aged Moravian bishop, Polycarp Müller, who proclaimed his future life dedicated to the ministry. The entire experience, even at such an early age, made a profound impact on Ernest....