1-20 of 104 results  for:

  • Christian: Catholic - clergy x
Clear all

Article

Antoine, Père (18 November 1748–19 January 1829), Roman Catholic priest, was born Francisco Antonio Ildefonso Moreno y Arze at Sedella, in Granada, Spain, the son of Pedro Moreno and Ana de Arze. As a young man he entered the Capuchin branch of the Franciscans, a segment of the Franciscan order established by Matteo di Bassi of Urbano, Italy, in 1525. Antonio de Sedella studied with and received his spiritual formation under the Capuchins of the Spanish province of Castile and during that period apparently earned a doctorate in theology. After spending a few years in Central America and then teaching theology back in Sedella, in 1779 he responded to a request from the bishop of Santiago de Cuba, who then held ecclesiastical jurisdiction over Louisiana, for missionary priests for Louisiana. Antonio de Sedella served as a Capuchin priest in New Orleans from January 1781, at the age of thirty-two, until his death forty-eight years later. Thus, although he was an Andalusian Spaniard, he is most prominently known for his labors among the city’s predominantly French-Catholic population, and for that reason, his French appellation, Père Antoine, has prevailed in the historical record....

Article

Barbelin, Joseph-Felix (30 May 1808–08 June 1869), clergyman and educator, was born near Lunéville (Meurthe-et-Moselle), France, the oldest child of Dominic Barbelin, Secretary of the Treasurer General for the region of Lunéville, and Elizabeth Louis. The Abbé Joseph L'hommée, his granduncle and godfather, was an early mentor. Barbelin completed preparatory studies at the College of Lunéville where another granduncle, the Abbé Pierre L'hommée, taught. Dreaming of missionary work with Native Americans, Barbelin entered the major seminary at Nancy, France....

Article

Barber, Virgil Horace (09 May 1782–27 March 1847), clergyman and educator, was born in Simsbury, Connecticut, the son of Daniel Barber, an Episcopal minister, and Chloe Owen Chase. He studied for the ministry at Dartmouth College (1801–1803), while teaching at Cheshire Academy, where he had begun his formal education. In 1805 he was ordained a deacon of the Episcopal church in Waterbury, Connecticut; two years later, upon ordination to the priesthood, he became its pastor. That same year he married Jerusha Booth; they had four daughters and a son....

Article

Barzynski, Vincent (20 September 1838–02 May 1899), Roman Catholic priest, was born in Sulislawice, Poland, the son of Joseph Barzynski, an organist at the local church, a part-time watchmaker, and town publicist, and Maryanna Seroczynska. Barzynski completed the philosophy curriculum at Lublin in 1858 and the theology curriculum there in 1861. He was ordained as a diocesan priest on 27 October 1861 and began his clerical career as vicar of the parish church at Horodlo, located on the Bug River. In the summer of 1862 he was transferred to the Zamosc Collegiate Church, where he accepted the position of canon under Suffragan Bishop W. Baranowski....

Article

Behrens, Henry (16 December 1815–17 October 1895), Roman Catholic priest and religious administrator, was born in Münstadt, Hanover, Germany. His parents’ names are unknown, and he kept no record of his family or early years. In 1832 he entered the novitiate of the German province of the Society of Jesus (Jesuits) at Estavayer-le-Lac, Switzerland. He was ordained a priest on 7 August 1842....

Article

Bishop, W. Howard (19 December 1885–11 June 1953), Catholic priest and founder of the Glenmary Home Missioners, was born William Howard Bishop in Washington, D.C., the son of Francis Besant Bishop, a doctor, and Eleanor Theresa Knowles, both born and raised in North Carolina. Bishop was educated in public schools but in keeping with his family’s social standing he attended Harvard College between 1906 and 1908. Originally motivated to pursue a career as a journalist, he took a year off from school to work and sort out his life. Ultimately, he enrolled at St. Mary’s Seminary in Baltimore, Maryland. With six years of Latin, four years of Greek, and a familiarity with French, German, advanced mathematics, history, and literature, he was well-prepared academically to enter the six-year seminary education, which included two years of college and four years of theology....

Article

Blum, Virgil Clarence (27 March 1913–05 April 1993), educator, author, activist, and clergyman, was born in Defiance, Iowa, one of twelve children of John Peter and Elizabeth (Rushenberg) Blum, both farmers. His grade school and high school years were spent at St. Peter's school in Defiance. In 1932 he began college at Dowling College, Des Moines, Iowa, and the next year transferred to Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska. On 31 Aug. 1934 he entered the Society of Jesus at St. Stanislaus Seminary at Florissant, Missouri, where he earned a bachelor's degree in Latin and English in 1938. (A brother, Victor Joseph, also became a Jesuit and became a professor of geophysics and seismology at St. Louis University). Virgil studied philosophy at St. Louis University in St. Louis, Missouri, continuing studies in the summer until he earned a master's degree in history and political science in 1945....

Article

Bójnowski, Lucyan (05 February 1868–28 July 1960), priest of the Roman Catholic church, was born in the village of Ŝwierzbutowo, county of Sokólka, province of Grodno, in the Russian-dominated part of partitioned Poland. His parents, Stanisław Bójnowski and Aleksandra Maciejewska, were of Polish ...

Article

Bouquillon, Thomas Joseph (16 May 1840–05 November 1902), Catholic priest and moral theologian, was born in Warnêton, Belgium. Little is known about Bouquillon’s parents other than their occupations as small landowners and farmers. Bouquillon received his early education in the small hamlet of Warnêton and in 1854 was sent to the episcopal college of St. Louis at Menin, Belgium, where until 1860 he learned languages and studied the liberal arts. Immediately thereafter he entered the petit séminaire of Roulers, Belgium, where he studied scholastic philosophy, and in 1862 he studied theology at the major seminary of Bruges, Belgium. In 1863 he matriculated at the Gregorian University in Rome, where he finished his theological studies, was ordained in 1865, and obtained a doctorate in moral theology in 1867....

Article

Cavanaugh, John Joseph (23 January 1899–28 December 1979), priest and educator, was born in Bennington Township, Shiawasee County, Michigan, the son of Michael Francis Cavanaugh and Mary Ann Keegan, farmers. His father died when John was five years old, and his mother was forced to sell their small farm and move with four young children to nearby Owosso, taking in boarders for a time to meet expenses. After completing parish grammar school, young John enrolled in an accelerated commercial course of typing, shorthand, and bookkeeping and, at thirteen, entered the work force, eventually serving as a business secretary....

Article

Charlevoix, Pierre-François-Xavier de (24 October 1682–01 February 1761), Jesuit priest and historian, was born at Saint-Quentin, France, the son of François de Charlevoix, a member of the old nobility and deputy king’s attorney, and Antoinette Forestier. He studied at the Collège des Bons-Enfants in Saint-Quentin and moved to Paris when he began (15 Sept. 1698) his two-year novitiate with the Society of Jesus. He then moved to the Collège Louis-le-Grand, where he studied rhetoric and philosophy....

Image

Dennis J. Comey. Photograph by Zamsky Studio, used by permission of Sarony Studios Inc. Courtesy of Francis F. Burch.

Article

Comey, Dennis J. (26 May 1896–14 October 1987), Roman Catholic clergyman and labor arbitrator, was born Dennis Joseph Comey in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Dennis Joseph Comey, an iron worker at the Baldwin Locomotive Works, and Catherine Veronica Reagan Comey; the parents had been farmers who emigrated from Timoleague, County Cork, Ireland. The oldest of thirteen children, he excelled in studies and athletics at St. Joseph's College Preparatory School in Philadelphia. On 30 July 1914 he entered the Society of Jesus at St. Andrew-on-Hudson, Poughkeepsie, New York, and continued his classical studies. He earned his A.B. (1920), M.A. (1921), and Ph.D. (1929) in philosophy from Woodstock College, Maryland; he first taught Latin at Boston College High School (1921–1922) and then Latin, Greek, Spanish, and rhetoric at Georgetown University, Washington, D.C. (1922–1925). He pursued theological studies at Woodstock College, where he was ordained a Roman Catholic priest on 20 June 1928. A year's concentration on ascetical theology at St. Beuno's College, Wales, preceded his solemn profession of his Jesuit vows in Rome, Italy, on 15 August 1931. In 1931 the Gregorian University in Rome named him a doctor of theology and in 1932 ...

Article

Corby, William (02 October 1833–28 December 1897), Roman Catholic priest and educator, was born in Detroit, Michigan, the son of Daniel Corby, a real estate dealer, and Elizabeth Stapleton. After working for four years in his father’s real estate firm, Corby entered the University of Notre Dame in 1853. He joined the Congregation of Holy Cross, a religious order, in 1854 and continued his studies at Notre Dame until 1860, when he was ordained a priest. Soon afterward, he was appointed director of the Manual Labor School at Notre Dame, Indiana, and served as pastor of a parish in South Bend, Indiana....

Article

Corcoran, James Andrew (30 March 1820–16 July 1889), Catholic theologian and editor, was born in Charleston, South Carolina, the son of Jane O’Farrell and John Corcoran, Irish immigrants and grocers. John Corcoran immigrated to Charleston in 1817 and died there in 1819 at the age of thirty-five, five months before James was born. James’s mother Jane took over the family grocery business and raised his older brother John and him until she, too, died in 1832, leaving her two sons to the care of a hired maid. ...

Article

Coughlin, Charles Edward (25 October 1891–27 October 1979), Catholic priest, radio personality, and political insurgent, was born in Hamilton, Ontario, the son of Thomas Coughlin and Amelia Mahoney, devout Catholics of Irish descent. Thomas Coughlin was the sexton of the Catholic cathedral in Hamilton; Amelia attended mass daily and dreamed of seeing her only child enter the priesthood. Throughout his youth Charles was surrounded by the institutions of the church. His family lived on the cathedral grounds, and he attended local parish schools. At age twelve he entered St. Michael’s, a secondary school and college run by the Basilian order and intended to prepare young boys to enter the clergy. Coughlin remained at St. Michael’s through college and in 1911 entered St. Basil’s Seminary to begin formal training for the priesthood. He was ordained in 1916, at the age of twenty-three. After teaching at Basilian schools in Canada for seven years, Coughlin left the order in 1923 and moved to Michigan to become a parish priest. Three years later he was assigned to a new parish in the Detroit suburb of Royal Oak, where he spent the rest of his life. He named his church the Shrine of the Little Flower, for the recently canonized Ste. Thérèse....

Image

Father Damien. Courtesy of the Clendening History of Medicine Library and Museum, University of Kansas Medical Center.

Article

Damien, Father (03 January 1840–15 April 1889), Roman Catholic priest, was born Joseph de Veuster in Tremeloo, Belgium, the son of François (also called Frans) de Veuster, a Flemish farmer, and Anne Catherine. His mother taught him a little at home, and he helped a local laborer who was both a blacksmith and a gravedigger. His father wanted him to become a merchant and sent him to an academy at Braine-le-Compt in the province of Hainault to learn French. But Joseph was eager to follow his brother Auguste, who after serving his novitiate in Paris was transferred to Louvain. In 1859 Joseph began to train there to become a lay brother. Calling himself Damien, he was transferred to the novitiate of Issy, near Paris, where he studied Latin and took vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience in 1860 as a brother of the Sacred Hearts of Jesus and Mary. He served and studied in Paris and Louvain. When his brother contracted typhus and was unable to fulfill his ambition to become a missionary in the Hawaiian Islands, Damien asked for and was given the assignment. He began his voyage from Bremerhaven in October 1863, went around Cape Horn, and docked at Honolulu in March 1864. In May he was ordained deacon and priest....

Article

Davis, Thurston Noble (12 October 1913–17 September 1986), Jesuit priest and editor of America, Jesuit priest and editor of America, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Noble T. Davis, a sales representative for the Saturday Evening Post, and Rose Mary Carey. As a child Davis moved from Kentucky to Georgia to Ohio as a result of his father’s occupation, finally settling in Bloomfield, New Jersey. At the age of fourteen Davis commuted from Bloomfield to the Jesuit military high school, Xavier, in lower Manhattan. After high school (1931) he entered the Society of Jesus (Jesuits), receiving a B.A. in philosophy from Georgetown University in 1937 and theological education at the Jesuits’ Woodstock College in Maryland between 1937 and 1942. He was ordained for the priesthood in 1942 and after two years of work in Jesuit educational institutions was sent to Harvard University where, studying under the classicist ...

Article

Dietz, Peter Ernest (10 July 1878–11 October 1947), Roman Catholic priest and labor activist, was born in New York City, the son of Frederick Dietz, a varnisher, and Eva Kern. His parents had emigrated from Bavaria, and the family was large and poor. After attending parish schools and a series of Catholic colleges in Pennsylvania and New York, Dietz, in 1900, entered the novitiate of the missionary community of the Society of the Divine Word in Moedling, Germany. Two years later, however, hoping to found a new religious order, he withdrew from the community. His plans came to naught, and in 1903 he returned to the United States, subsequently studying at Catholic University and at St. Mary’s Seminary in Baltimore. Dietz affiliated himself with the diocese of Cleveland, Ohio, and was ordained to the priesthood by Cardinal ...