1-20 of 30 results  for:

  • postmaster general x
Clear all

Article

Barry, William Taylor (05 February 1784–30 August 1835), politician, jurist, and postmaster general, was born in Lunenburg County, Virginia, the son of John Barry, a revolutionary war veteran and farmer, and Susannah Dozier. The family moved to Kentucky, apparently in 1796, and settled in Fayette County. Following a course of study in law at William and Mary College, Barry was admitted to the Kentucky bar and set up practice in Lexington in 1805. That same year he married Lucy Waller Overton, with whom he would have two children before her premature death....

Image

Montgomery Blair. Engraving by J. C. Buttre, from a set of portraits of members of the Lincoln cabinet. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-116982).

Article

Blair, Montgomery (10 May 1813–27 July 1883), postmaster general and lawyer, was born in Franklin County, Kentucky, the son of Francis Preston Blair and Eliza Violet Gist Blair. His father, who served in the War of 1812 and was an assistant newspaper editor at the time of Montgomery’s birth, later became the founder and editor of ...

Article

Burleson, Albert Sidney (07 June 1863–24 November 1937), congressman and postmaster general, was born in San Marcos, Hays County, Texas, the son of Edward Burleson, Jr., and Emma Kyle, farmers. His paternal grandfather was a general in the Texas Revolution, a member of the First Texas Congress, and in 1841 vice president of the Texas Republic. His mother’s father was a colonel in the Confederate army, and his own father served in the Mexican War, with the Texas Rangers, and in the Confederate army....

Article

Campbell, James (01 September 1812–27 January 1893), jurist and U.S. postmaster general, was born in the Southwark section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Anthony Campbell, an affluent shopkeeper, and Catherine McGarvey. James, an Irish-Catholic by birth and upbringing, was educated privately, studied law in the Philadelphia law offices of Edward D. Ingraham, and was admitted to the Pennsylvania bar on 14 September 1833. He then opened a legal practice that grew rapidly and brought him increasing prominence. As a result, he was appointed to various local political positions and gradually emerged as the spokesman for Philadelphia’s Catholics....

Image

George B. Cortelyou. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-92421).

Article

Cortelyou, George Bruce (26 July 1862–23 October 1940), presidential aide, cabinet secretary, and businessman, was born in New York City, the son of Peter Crolius Cortelyou, a businessman and Rose Seary. Educated at public and private schools, he graduated from the Massachusetts State Normal School in 1882. He studied music in Boston before going back to New York to learn stenography and court reporting. He married Lilly Morris Hinds in 1888; they had five children....

Article

Creswell, John Angel James (18 November 1828–23 December 1891), lawyer and politician, was born in Port Deposit, Maryland, the son of John G. Creswell and Rebecca E. Webb. In 1848 he graduated from Dickinson with honors, and two years later he passed the bar. Not long afterward he married Hannah J. Richardson; they had no children....

Article

Dickinson, Donald McDonald (17 January 1846–15 October 1917), lawyer and postmaster general, was born in Port Ontario, New York, the son of Asa C. Dickinson, a voyager, and Minerva Holmes. In 1848 Donald moved with his family to Michigan’s St. Clair County and then four years later to Detroit, where he attended the Detroit public schools. He graduated from the University of Michigan Law School in March 1867 and was admitted to the Michigan bar on 2 May 1867. A successful young attorney, Dickinson in 1869 married Frances Platt. The Dickinsons had seven children, five of whom died in one year, 1878, from spinal meningitis....

Image

James Farley. Second row, left, with other members of the Roosevelt administration. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-96634).

Article

Farley, James Aloysius (30 May 1888–09 June 1976), chairman of the Democratic National Committee and postmaster general of the United States in the first two administrations of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, chairman of the Democratic National Committee and postmaster general of the United States in the first two administrations of ...

Article

Gresham, Walter Quintin (17 March 1832–28 May 1895), jurist and cabinet officer, was born in Harrison County, Indiana, the son of William Gresham, a farmer and cabinetmaker, and Sarah Davis. His father, serving as county sheriff, was killed by an outlaw when Walter was less than two years old, and Sarah Gresham later married Noah Rumley, a farmer. Gresham taught school and attended Indiana University’s Preparatory Department, 1851–1852, before reading law with a prominent local Whig. He was admitted to the bar on 1 April 1854 and entered into practice at Corydon, Indiana....

Article

Habersham, Joseph (28 July 1751–18 November 1815), revolutionary leader, merchant, and politician, was born in Savannah, Georgia, the son of James Habersham and Mary Bolton. His father had followed George Whitefield to Georgia and eventually became the young colony’s leading merchant. He was acting governor in the early 1770s and a Loyalist until his death in 1775. Out of concern for Joseph’s health, his father sent him to Princeton, New Jersey, at age eight. Joseph attended the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) from 1763 to 1767. The elder Habersham was disappointed in the results of this education and sent his son to England to be a merchant apprentice under Graham, Clark, and Company in 1768. James Habersham’s friends enrolled the boy in Woolwich Academy for several months to improve his handwriting and mathematics before putting him to work. Although Joseph’s English career was reasonably successful, he was unhappy and disliked the English. He returned to Savannah in 1771....

Article

Hitchcock, Frank Harris (05 October 1867–05 August 1935), politician and postmaster general, was born in Amherst, Ohio, the son of Henry Chapman Hitchcock, a Congregational clergyman, and Mary Laurette Harris. He attended public school in Boston and entered Harvard in 1887. Interested in politics and sports, he participated in collegiate boxing matches and was a Republican precinct committeeman in Boston. After graduation in 1891, he began a career in public service, holding several minor jobs in Washington, D.C., including that of a biologist in the Department of Agriculture. During this time he studied at the Columbian law school (now George Washington University), where he earned an LL.B. degree in 1894 and the LL.M. in 1895. He was admitted to the District of Columbia bar in 1894. In 1897 he was made chief of the Agriculture Department’s Division of Foreign Markets....

Image

Joseph Holt. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-99876).

Article

Holt, Joseph (06 January 1807–01 August 1894), jurist, secretary of war, and postmaster general, was born near Hardinsburg, Kentucky, the son of John Holt, an attorney, and Eleanor Stephens. Educated at St. Joseph’s College in Bardstown and Centre College in Danville, Holt subsequently read law in Lexington. In 1828 he established a practice in Elizabethtown, Kentucky, where he was briefly in partnership with Congressman ...

Article

Howe, Timothy Otis (24 February 1816–25 March 1883), senator and postmaster general, was born in Livermore Falls, Androscoggin County, Maine, the son of Timothy Howe, a doctor, and Betsy Howard. He attended local public schools, worked on a farm, and graduated from the Maine Wesleyan Seminary. After studying law, he was admitted to the bar in 1839 and practiced in Readfield, Maine, where for a short time he was postmaster. In 1841 he married Linda Ann Haynes, with whom he raised two children. An ardent Whig, Howe served in the state legislature in 1845. The next year he relocated to Green Bay, Wisconsin, for health reasons. Although he ran unsuccessfully for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives in 1848, Howe succeeded two years later in winning election as judge of the Fourth Circuit Court, which meant he also sat on the state supreme court and for one year occupied the chief justiceship. While serving as circuit judge, he presided at the locally celebrated murder trial of Ann Wheeler in Kenosha. He held this judicial position until 1855, when he resigned to return to his law practice....

Article

Jewell, Marshall (20 October 1825–10 February 1883), businessman and politician, was born in Winchester, New Hampshire, the son of Pliny Jewell, a tanner, and Emily Alexander. As a young man Jewell, who lacked formal education, displayed great interest in the newly invented telegraph. In 1847 he helped erect the line from Louisville to New Orleans, and two years later he supervised connections between Boston and New York. While involved with these concerns, he rose from working in his father’s tannery in Hartford, Connecticut, to become a partner in the family business, a belting factory, in 1850. During the next two decades he entered several businesses, including railroads and banking, and was part owner of the Hartford ...

Image

Amos Kendall. Daguerreotype from the studio of Mathew B. Brady. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-109899).

Article

Kendall, Amos (16 August 1789–12 November 1869), journalist, postmaster general, and business agent, was born in Dunstable, Massachusetts, the son of Zebedee Kendall and Molly Dakin, farmers. Kendall spent his early years working on the family farm under the supervision of his father, a deacon in the Congregational church. After attending academies in New Ipswich, New Hampshire, and Groton, Massachusetts, he enrolled in 1807 at Dartmouth College. Frail and unaccustomed to independence, Kendall had difficulty adjusting to college life, especially because many of his classmates had moral standards much less strict than his own and because he had to drop out each winter to earn money by teaching school. But he adapted, made friends, and was so intelligent and hardworking that when he graduated in 1811 he ranked first in his class. Uncertain about his future, he spent the next few years in Groton studying law under Republican congressman William M. Richardson, who later became chief justice of the New Hampshire Superior Court....