1-13 of 13 results  for:

  • civil servant x
Clear all

Article

Bulfinch, Charles (08 August 1763–15 April 1844), civil servant and architect, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Thomas Bulfinch, a physician, and Susan Apthorp. Scion of long-established and wealthy colonial families, some members of which had been recognized amateur architects whose books were available to him, Bulfinch graduated from Harvard College in 1781. Apparently it was at Harvard that he learned drafting and the geometrical construction of linear perspective. After a period in the counting house of Joseph Barrell, where, as he later wrote, the “unsettled state of the time” produced “leisure to cultivate a taste for Architecture,” he spent the period from June 1785 to January 1787 on a grand tour of England, France, and Italy, “observing … the wonders of Architecture, & the kindred arts of painting and sculpture.” Described by Louis XVI’s director general of gardens and buildings as “un gentilhomme américain” who was already “plein de goût et de connaissance dan [ ...

Article

Clague, Ewan (27 December 1896–12 April 1987), economist and civil servant, was born in Prescott, Washington, the son of John Clague and Eleanor Christian Cooper, farmers and immigrants from the Isle of Man, Great Britain. Clague attended the University of Washington, earning an A.B. in economics in 1917. After two years in the U.S. Army, 1917–1919, he returned to the University of Washington, where he earned an A.M. in economics in 1921. He went on to study for his doctorate in economics at what was then perhaps the nation’s leading institution of higher education in the fields of labor economics and industrial relations, the University of Wisconsin....

Article

Greenhow, Robert (1800–27 March 1854), government servant and historian, was born in Richmond, Virginia, the son of Robert Greenhow, a merchant, and Mary Ann Wills. Greenhow graduated from the College of William and Mary in 1816 and from the College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York City in 1821. After further medical study abroad, he practiced medicine in New York City from 1825 to 1828, when he took up a position as a translator and librarian at the Department of State in Washington. Among his responsibilities was preparation of historical works on diplomatic issues. He wrote ...

Image

Anna Arnold Hedgeman. Oil on canvas, 1945, by Betsy Graves Reyneau. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution; gift of the Harmon Foundation.

Article

Hedgeman, Anna Arnold (05 July 1899–17 January 1990), educator, policy consultant, and political activist, was born Anna Marie Arnold in Marshalltown, Iowa, the daughter and eldest child of William James Arnold II, an entrepreneur, and Marie Ellen Parker Arnold. The Arnolds subsequently moved to Anoka, Minnesota, becoming the only black family in that town. Young Anna graduated from high school in 1918 and went on to attend Hamline University in nearby Saint Paul, becoming the college's first black graduate in 1922....

Article

Howorth, Lucy (01 July 1895–23 August 1997), lawyer, politician, and feminist activist, was born Lucy Somerville in Greenville, Mississippi, the youngest of four children and second daughter of Robert and Nellie Nugent Somerville. Many of her forefathers were legislators, lawyers, or judges. Her female ancestors were known as women of strong character who were well respected in their communities. Through homeschooling and example, Nellie Somerville passed on to her youngest child a love for learning and a concern for contemporary social issues. Nellie, a college graduate, advocated temperance and was president of the Mississippi Woman Suffrage Association. She was also a devout Methodist, a perspective never accepted by Lucy. Nellie began taking Lucy to community meetings, including suffrage rallies, before her first birthday. When she was older Lucy helped at suffrage conventions and met national women’s rights leaders including Dr. ...

Article

McCarthy, Charles (29 June 1873–26 March 1921), civil servant and reformer, was born in Brockton, Massachusetts, the son of John McCarthy, an engine-tender in a shoe factory, and Katherine O’Shea Desmond, a domestic servant who also maintained a boardinghouse for immigrant laborers. At the age of nineteen, after working at numerous occupations while reading vociferously, McCarthy was admitted to Brown University as a special student. There he distinguished himself academically and athletically, and became the first Brown player to score touchdowns against both Harvard and Yale. He also developed a long-lasting friendship with the team’s student trainer, ...

Image

William Douglas O'Connor. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-98112).

Article

O’Connor, William Douglas (02 January 1832–09 May 1889), author and civil servant, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of Peter D. O’Connor, a laborer (mother’s name unknown). O’Connor left home at age eight, after an argument with his father. Except for that incident, nothing is known about his childhood or education. In the 1850s he came under the sway of the Providence, Rhode Island, poet ...

Article

Orshansky, Mollie (9 Jan. 1915–18 Dec. 2006), civil servant, economist and statistician, was born in the Bronx, New York City, the sixth daughter of Samuel Orshansky and Fannie Orshansky, recent Jewish immigrants from the Ukraine. Samuel worked at various occupations (tinworker, ironworker, plumber, repairman), eventually becoming the proprietor of a small neighborhood grocery store. Mollie was born in poverty and grew up understanding how families coped with inadequate incomes. In her South Bronx neighborhood few young women went even as far as high school, going directly into the labor force as soon as possible. Mollie was the first member of her family to attend high school. She graduated Hunter College High School in ...

Article

Thornton, William (20 May 1759–28 March 1828), architect, civil servant, and essayist, was born on the island of Tortola in the West Indies, the son of William Thornton, a planter, and Dorcas Zeagers. The senior Thornton died when his son was five years old, and the boy went to live with relatives in Lancashire, England. He served a medical apprenticeship in Lancashire, studied at the University of Edinburgh, and received a medical degree from the University of Aberdeen in 1784. After his graduation he traveled in France and the British Isles before returning to Tortola in 1786. Enamored of the republican ideals of the American Revolution, he emigrated to Philadelphia in 1786 and became a citizen of the United States in 1788. He established a medical practice in Philadelphia but soon abandoned it, finding the practice boring and the fees unsatisfactory. Thornton enjoyed a creditable income from his West Indies plantation, which allowed him to pursue his intellectual and artistic interests. His education and European background won him admittance to intellectual circles in Philadelphia, including election to the American Philosophical Society. Thornton married Anna Marie Brodeau, a well-educated and cultured girl of fifteen, in 1790. They spent two years on Thornton’s plantation on Tortola, returned to Philadelphia, and in 1794 made their home in the new city of Washington, where they resided for the remainder of their lives. They had no children....

Article

Tolley, Howard Ross (30 September 1889–18 September 1958), agricultural economist and civil servant, was born in Howard County, Indiana, the son of Elmer E. Tolley, a farmer and schoolteacher, and Mollie Grindle, also a schoolteacher. Tolley attended Marion Normal College in Marion, Indiana, and Indiana University, where he received a B.A. in mathematics. He then taught high school mathematics in Michigan City, Indiana, but found it unrewarding. Through a civil service examination, he obtained a job as a “computer” with the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. He married Zora Hazlett and moved to Washington, D.C., in 1912; they had three children....

Article

Yarmolinsky, Adam (17 November 1922–05 January 2000), public policymaker in the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, public policymaker in the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, was born in New York City, the oldest of two sons of Avrahm Yarmolinsky, a Russian émigré and scholar of Slavonic literature, and ...