1-20 of 64 results  for:

  • attorney general (federal) x
Clear all

Article

Akerman, Amos Tappan (23 February 1821–21 December 1880), attorney general of the United States, was born in Portsmouth, New Hampshire, the son of Benjamin Akerman (pronounced with a long A), a farmer and surveyor, and Olive Meloon. Despite straitened family circumstances, Akerman attended Phillips Exeter Academy and (with loans from friends and relatives) Dartmouth College, where he graduated Phi Beta Kappa in 1842. Having suffered lung damage as a boy while swimming, he was advised to move to a milder climate. This he did in 1842, accepting successive school teaching assignments in North Carolina and Georgia, culminating in 1846–1848 as tutor in the Savannah home of senator and former attorney general ...

Article

Congress created the office of Attorney General in the Judicial Act of 1789. The attorney general was tasked with prosecuting in the Supreme Court civil and criminal cases of national interest and lending legal advice to the president. In 1870, Congress, concerned about the constantly increasing workload of the attorney general and the private attorneys who worked as his assistants, created the Department of Justice and placed the attorney general in charge. The position evolved in the twentieth century to cover cases concerning the environment, civil rights, and national security....

Image

Edward Bates. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-B8172-1741).

Article

Bates, Edward (04 September 1793–25 March 1869), political leader and attorney general of the United States, was born in Goochland County, Virginia, the son of Thomas Fleming Bates, a planter and merchant, and Caroline Matilda Woodson. A Quaker, Thomas Bates was read out of meeting when he enlisted to fight in the Revolution, from which he emerged deeply in debt. Edward nevertheless grew up surrounded by slaves. After his father died in 1805, Edward received a good education at the home of his cousin Benjamin Bates in Hanover, Maryland, and then at Charlotte Hall Academy in St. Marys County, Maryland....

Article

Biddle, Francis Beverley (09 May 1886–04 October 1968), lawyer, judge, and U.S. attorney general, was born in Paris, France, the son of Algernon Sydney Biddle, a law professor at the University of Pennsylvania, and Frances Robinson. Biddle attended Haverford Academy (1895–1899); Groton Academy (1899–1905), where he excelled at boxing and gymnastics; and Harvard University, from which he graduated with a B.A. cum laude in 1909 and an LL.B. in 1911. His first job upon graduating was as personal secretary to Associate Justice ...

Article

Black, Jeremiah Sullivan (10 January 1810–19 August 1883), U.S. attorney general, U.S. secretary of state, and attorney, was born near Stony Creek, Pennsylvania, the son of Henry Black, a judge and legislator, and Mary Sullivan. Black read law under Chauncey Forward in Somerset, Pennsylvania, passing his bar examination at age twenty. When Forward was elected to Congress in 1830, he left Black in charge of his office, and the young attorney assumed responsibilities far beyond his experience. Black’s practice in Forward’s office became more secure when in 1836 he married Forward’s daughter Mary Forward. They had five children. In 1843 Black was baptized into his father-in-law’s faith, the Disciples of Christ church, and developed a close personal friendship with its founder ...

Article

Brewster, Benjamin Harris (13 October 1816–04 April 1888), attorney general of the United States, was born in Salem, New Jersey, the son of Francis Enoch Brewster, a lawyer, and Maria Hampton. When Brewster was a year old, the family moved to Philadelphia. Shortly after his fifth birthday Brewster was severely burned, and his badly scarred face affected his personality. Its most obvious manifestation was his adopting—to partially cover his scars—the dress of an 1830s fop with a ruffled shirt, high collar, and white silk hat. His deformity repelled his father, whose reputation caused Brewster more hardship. Considered by proper Philadelphians to be “a blackguard in every sense, degraded & stained by every vice” (Wainwright, p. 155), his father abandoned his family, lived with his mistress, Isabella Anderson, had two sons by her (one of whom, Frederick Carroll Brewster, became a lawyer and jurist), and tried to disinherit Brewster and his sister. After Benjamin Brewster successfully contested the will in 1855, the estate was divided evenly among the legitimate and illegitimate children....

Article

Butler, Benjamin Franklin (14 December 1795–08 November 1858), attorney general of the United States, was born in Columbia County, New York, the son of Medad Butler, a judge and state legislator, and Hannah Tylee. At age sixteen he began to study the law under future president ...

Article

Clark, Tom Campbell (23 September 1899–13 June 1977), attorney general of the United States and U.S. Supreme Court justice, was born in Dallas, Texas, the son of William Henry Clark, an attorney, and Virginia “Jennie” Falls. His parents, who had moved to Dallas from Mississippi, were from aristocratic southern families, and both of Tom’s grandfathers had been officers in the Confederate army. His father, besides being active in Democratic party politics, was a talented and capable lawyer. Unfortunately, William Clark also suffered from alcoholism, and by the time Tom reached school age, William’s drinking problem had devastated a once thriving legal practice and the family’s finances. Tom had to deliver newspapers and work in a drugstore to help out. He nevertheless managed to become one of the first Eagle Scouts in the United States at age fourteen and to participate in oratory and debate at Bryan Street High School, from which he graduated in 1917....

Image

John Jordan Crittenden. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-6848).

Article

Crittenden, John Jordan (10 September 1786–26 July 1863), U.S. senator, U.S. attorney general, and governor of Kentucky, was born in Woodford County, Kentucky, the son of John Crittenden, a landholder, and Judith Harris. His father served with Morgan’s Riflemen and later with General ...

Image

Homer Cummings. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-90035).

Article

Cummings, Homer Stillé (30 April 1870–10 September 1956), attorney, Democratic party leader, and attorney general of the United States, was born in Chicago, Illinois, the son of Uriah C. Cummings, a businessman, and Audie Schuyler Stillé. Educated at the Heathcote School in upstate New York, the Sheffield School of Engineering of Yale University, and the Yale Law School, from which he graduated in 1893, Cummings opened a legal practice in Stamford, Connecticut, soon thereafter and formed a partnership with Charles D. Lockwood that lasted until he joined the ...

Image

Harry Daugherty. Courtesy of the Library of Congress (LC-USZ62-107385).

Article

Daugherty, Harry Micajah (26 January 1860–12 October 1941), politician, was born in Washington Court House, Ohio, the son of John H. Daugherty, a farmer and merchant tailor, and Jane Draper. John Daugherty died of diphtheria when Harry was only four years of age, and Harry was weakened by the disease. The family struggled financially, and Harry learned to fend for himself, working in a series of odd jobs as a youth. Spurning his mother’s desire for him to become a Methodist minister, Daugherty instead chose law as a profession. Though he had not attended college, Daugherty enrolled at Michigan Law School and graduated in 1881. In 1884 he married Lucy Walker, and they had one son and one daughter....

Article

Garland, Augustus Hill (11 June 1832–26 January 1899), governor, U.S. senator, and attorney general, was born in Covington, Tennessee, the son of Rufus Garland and Barbara Hill, farmers. When he was less than a year old, his family moved to Lost Prairie, Arkansas, on the Red River, where his father opened a store. Shortly after his father’s death in 1833, his mother moved the family to Spring Hill, Arkansas. When she married Judge Thomas Hubbard in 1836, the family settled in Washington, Arkansas. Garland began his education in a private school and later attended St. Mary’s College in Lebanon, Kentucky. He graduated from another Catholic college, St. Joseph’s, in Bardstown, Kentucky, in 1849. Following a year as a rural school teacher in Arkansas, he read law and was admitted to the bar in 1853, joining his stepfather’s firm in Washington, Arkansas. He married Sarah Virginia Sanders in 1853; they had eight children. In 1856 Garland moved to Little Rock to become a law partner with Ebenezer Cummins, who died less than a year later. Thus Garland became the head of a lucrative law office in the state capital. He was admitted to the bar of the U.S. Supreme Court in 1860....

Article

Gregory, Thomas Watt (06 November 1861–26 February 1933), U.S. attorney general, was born in Crawfordsville, Mississippi, the son of Francis Robert Gregory, a physician who died in Confederate army service, and Mary Cornelia Watt. He grew up on his maternal grandfather’s Mississippi plantation and graduated from Southwestern Presbyterian University in Clarksville, Tennessee, in 1883. After a year of studying law at the University of Virginia, he transferred to the University of Texas, graduating with an LL.B. in 1885. In 1893 he married Julia Nalle, with whom he had two daughters and two sons....

Article

Griggs, John William (10 July 1849–28 November 1927), attorney general of the United States and governor of New Jersey, was born in Sussex County, New Jersey, the son of Daniel Griggs and Emeline Johnson, prosperous farmers. Griggs graduated from Lafayette College in 1868 after working as a railroad ticket agent to pay for his education. A later campaign slogan said he had moved “From Ticket Agent to Governor.” He studied law for three years near Paterson, New Jersey, and formed a close friendship with ...

Article

Harmon, Judson (03 February 1846–22 February 1927), attorney general of the United States and governor of Ohio, was born in Newtown, Ohio, the son of Benjamin Franklin Harmon, a Baptist minister, and Julia Bronson, a former teacher. During the Civil War, Harmon, at age seventeen, joined the Cincinnati Home Guard and briefly participated in the pursuit of ...

Article

Hoar, Ebenezer Rockwood (21 February 1816–31 January 1895), judge and attorney general, was born in Concord, Massachusetts, the son of Samuel Hoar, a lawyer and congressman, and Sarah Sherman. Hoar was a mischievous and precocious lad whose scholarship was enhanced by keeping up with his older sister Elizabeth. Although he was ready to enter college at fourteen, his father suggested that he work on a farm for a year. During his first day’s work, Hoar (who was nearsighted) stepped on a scythe and permanently injured his foot, but he was able to participate in the interclass mayhem known as football when he entered Harvard in 1831. After graduating third in the class of 1835, Hoar taught Latin to young girls for a year in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Returning home, he read law under his father’s tutelage, entered Harvard Law School in 1837, received his LL.B. in 1839, and on 30 September of that year was admitted to the Massachusetts bar. Hoar began to practice in Concord, where he married Caroline Downes Brooks in 1840; they had seven children....