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Du Simitière, Pierre Eugène (18 September 1737–?10 Oct. 1784), artist, collector, and museum proprietor, was born in Geneva, Switzerland, the son of Jean-Henri Ducimetière (also spelled Dusimitière), a broker with the East Indies, and Judith-Ulrique Cunegonde Delorme. Du Simitière was baptized in the Calvinist church. He studied drawing with an unidentified Geneva artist, probably before going to Amsterdam where he joined the Eglise Wallonne in 1754. He may have served in the army in Flanders. In 1757 he sailed from Amsterdam to St. Eustatius, in the Dutch West Indies. He spent more than five years at St. Eustatius and nearby Saba Island, Curaçao, Jamaica, and Saint-Domingue. Intending to write a natural history of the region, he collected samples or made drawings of plants and animals and noted information about the language and customs of the people living there....

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Moore, Charles Herbert (10 April 1840–15 February 1930), painter, scholar, and educator, was born in New York City, the son of Charles Moore, a lace merchant, and Jane Maria Berendtson (anglicized as Benson). He attended New York public schools and began taking drawing lessons from the landscape painter Benjamin Coe by age thirteen. While still a teenager Moore began exhibiting his paintings at the National Academy of Design, supporting himself by selling landscapes to New York art dealers and teaching drawing and painting from Coe’s studios at New York University. During the early 1860s Moore’s sketching tours of the Hudson River valley increased in frequency and duration. His efforts during these trips are represented by four landscapes given to Vassar College by ...

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Rebay, Hilla (31 May 1890–27 September 1967), artist and curator, was born Baroness Hildegard Anna Augusta Elisabeth Rebay von Ehrenwiesen in Strassburg, Alsace, the daughter of Baron Franz Josef Rebay von Ehrenwiesen, a German military officer and Bavarian noble, and Antonie von Eicken. Rebay’s artistic talent was apparent early, and she received lessons from private tutors. By age eleven she was painting portraits. The family moved to Cologne, where she attended secondary school and received further artistic training with August Zinkeisen, a member of the Dusseldorf Academy. At this time Rebay developed what would become a lifelong interest in theosophy, a mystical faith based on Eastern religions and occultism. In 1909 she studied at the Académie Julian in Paris; one year later, at the urging of German jugendstil painter Fritz Erler, she moved to Munich to continue her training. Her first exhibit was during the fall of 1912 in the Cologne Kunstverein. The following year she returned briefly to Paris, then in 1913 she moved to Berlin. After World War I broke out Rebay made several trips to Zurich—where she met painter Hans (Jean) Arp and the group of artists known as the dadaists—but despite the fighting she continued to live and paint in Berlin....

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Saint-Mémin, Charles Balthazar Julien Févret de (12 March 1770–23 June 1852), artist and museum director, was born in Dijon, France, the son of Bénigne-Charles Févret de Saint-Mémin, a lawyer, and Marie-Victoire de Motmans. His father was a member of the Burgundian nobility; his maternal grandfather, a wealthy sugarcane planter in the Caribbean colony of Saint-Domingue and solicitor general of the sovereign council of Port-au-Prince. Saint-Mémin was privately educated in Dijon. In 1784 his parents enrolled him in the royal military academy in Paris. After graduation in 1788 he was appointed to the palace guard of Louis XVI. His military career ended abruptly when the guard was disbanded in 1789 at the beginning of the French Revolution. After the nobility was abolished in 1790, Saint-Mémin and his parents and two sisters fled to Switzerland....

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Savage, Edward (26 November 1761–06 July 1817), artist and museum proprietor, was born in Princeton, Massachusetts, the son of Seth Savage and Lydia Craige, occupations unknown. Savage, a self-taught artist, may have worked first as a goldsmith. His earliest paintings include a naively proportioned group portrait of his parents, grandfather, and siblings (c. 1779, Worcester Art Museum), copies of portraits by Boston colonial artist ...