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Clarke, Parker (03 April 1748–25 March 1823), surgeon and soldier, was born in Ipswich, Massachusetts, the son of Parker Clarke and Lydia Phillips. In 1769 he married Judith Lunt; they had three sons. After obtaining some medical training in New England, Clarke immigrated to Cumberland Township on the Isthmus of Chignecto in Nova Scotia. By 1770 he was living in Fort Lawrence, where he farmed and practiced medicine as a prominent member of the New England planter community, which by then formed the majority of the population on the isthmus and throughout Nova Scotia....

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Faulkner, Thomas (1743–07 July 1803), soldier, was born in New England, the son of Edward Faulkner and Martha Stewart. Faulkner immigrated to Nova Scotia in the early 1760s, settling in the Cobequid district on the north shore of Minas Basin. This prosperous farming district included the townships of Truro, Onslow, and Londonderry, and it had a population, primarily composed of New Englanders of Scotch-Irish background, that amounted to perhaps 1,000 people in 1775. Noted for its antipathy to the central government at Halifax, Cobequid was characteristically in the forefront of political opposition to Governor Francis Legge’s militia legislation of late 1775. This legislation imposed a tax to support the militia, a portion of which would be drawn from outlying districts to defend the capital of Halifax....

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Whipple, Prince (fl. 1776–1783), revolutionary war soldier, was born to unknown parents in Amabou, Africa. When Whipple was about ten, his parents sent him to America with either a brother or cousin, ostensibly to be educated in the manner of Prince’s older brother, who had returned from America four years before. Unfortunately, the captain of the ship on which the two boys traveled diverted to Baltimore, Maryland, and sold them into slavery instead....