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Bauer, Marion Eugenie (15 August 1887–09 August 1955), composer, teacher, and advocate of modern music, was the daughter of Jacques Bauer and Julie Heyman. Her father was an amateur musician who earned his living as a grocer, and her mother was a language teacher. Born in Walla Walla, Washington, Bauer began her musical study in Portland, Oregon, where the family moved after the death of her father in 1890. Soon after her high school graduation in 1903, Bauer moved to New York City to live with her eldest sister, Emilie Frances, a pianist and music critic, who provided her with financial support and encouragement. During this period, Bauer studied piano and composition with Henry Holden Huss....

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Bradbury, William Batchelder (06 October 1816–07 January 1868), music teacher, composer, and publisher, was born in York County, Maine, the son of David Bradbury and Sophia Chase. When Bradbury was fourteen years old the family moved to Boston, where William began the study of harmony and decided to become a professional musician. He attended the Boston Academy of Music, sang in ...

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Childers, Lulu Vere (28 February 1870–06 March 1946), founder and director of the School of Music at Howard University and singer, was born in Dryridge, Kentucky, the daughter of former slaves Alexander Childers and Eliza Butler. She studied voice at the Oberlin Conservatory of Music and in 1896 was awarded a diploma that was replaced by a bachelor’s degree in 1906 when the conservatory began granting degrees. The Oberlin Conservatory chapter of Pi Kappa Lambda, a national honor society, elected her a member in 1927. She studied voice further with Sydney Lloyd Wrightson at the Washington Conservatory of Music, with William Shakespeare, and with Oscar Devries at Chicago Musical College....

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Farwell, Arthur (23 April 1872–20 January 1952), composer, author, and teacher, was born Arthur George Farwell in St. Paul, Minnesota, the son of George Lyman Farwell, a hardware wholesaler, and Sara Gardner Wyer. Farwell studied electrical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, graduating in 1893. Then, as a result of his exposure to high-quality music in Boston during his years at MIT, he studied music with Homer Norris in Boston from 1893 to 1896. He then traveled to Europe where he studied with Engelbert Humperdinck and Hans Pfitzner in Berlin and, briefly, with Alexandre Guilmant in Paris....

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Flagg, Josiah (28 May 1737–30 December 1794), musician and soldier, was born in Woburn, Massachusetts, the son of Gershom Flagg, and Martha Johnson. Sometime before 1747 Josiah moved with his family to Boston, where one of his boyhood friends was Paul Revere. In about 1750 Flagg, Revere, and five other boys formed themselves into a society of bell ringers and petitioned Christ (Episcopal) Church for permission to play on the church’s bells. The exact manner of Flagg’s musical education is not known. It is likely that he attended one or more singing schools in the Boston area and perhaps took lessons from the organist at Christ Church. His subsequent activities reveal him to have been a well-rounded musician who was aware of recent fashions in European music. In 1760 he married Elizabeth Hawkes; they had eight children....

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Graupner, Gottlieb (06 October 1767–16 April 1836), musician and music publisher, was born Johann Christian Gottlieb Graupner in Verden, Germany, the son of Johann Georg Graupner, an honored Hanover musician, and Anna Maria Agnesa Schoenhagen. He apparently bore no relation to famed composer Christoph Graupner of Darmstadt. At age fifteen Gottlieb followed his father’s profession and joined the nearby Hanover regiment as an oboist. After his father’s death Gottlieb was discharged in 1788 and traveled to London where, in 1791–1792, he performed under Joseph Haydn in the premieres of the first set of his “London” symphonies. Graupner then immigrated to the United States, probably through Prince Edward Island off the coast of Canada. He gained employment as a musician in a traveling Atlantic coast theater company on the West and Rignall circuit. In April 1796 he married Catherine Comerford Hillier, a widow with three children, a professional singer, and a member of the company. The Graupners settled in Boston in the winter of 1796–1797 and worked to improve the musical quality of Boston’s cultural life....

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Nabokov, Nicolas (17 April 1903–06 April 1978), composer, teacher, and music promoter, was born in Lubcha, Novogrudok, in the Minsk region of Belorussia, the son of Dimitri Dimitrievich Nabokov, a court chamberlain and justice of the peace, and Lydia Falz-Fein. In 1911 his family moved to St. Petersburg, and from 1913 to 1920 Nabokov studied composition privately with Vladimir Ivanovich Rebikov. He spent the 1920s and early 1930s in Germany and France, first at the Stuttgart Conservatory (1920–1922) and then at the Berlin Hochschule für Musik (1922–1923), where he studied with Paul Juon and Ferruccio Busoni. From 1923 to 1926 he attended the Sorbonne in Paris, from which he earned the degree of License ès lettres. Following graduation, Nabokov worked until 1933 in both Paris and Germany as a private teacher of languages, composition, and literature. During this period he got his first important break as a composer, a commission from Sergei Diaghilev (partly as a result of Stravinsky’s endorsement) for the ballet-oratorio ...

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Nassi, Thomas (02 March 1892–21 December 1964), musician and pioneering music educator, was born Thoma Nashi (Nasji) in Dardha, Albania, the son of Gaqo Nashi. His mother’s name is not yet known. A member of the educated Albanian Orthodox minority, Nassi’s father had moved the family to the mountain community of Dardha, near Korça, Albania, in order to escape domination by the Ottoman Turks. The Korça region of southeastern Albania was a center of Albanian Orthodox church and nationalist activity and has been the place of origin of most Albanian immigrants to the United States. The elder Nassi abandoned his family when Thomas was six years old, after which the boy was sent to the care of an uncle in Athens, Greece. There he received a lyceum education and training in music. His first instrument was violin, followed by flute after a wrist injury....

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Root, Frederick Woodman (13 June 1846–08 November 1916), music teacher, author, and editor, was born in Boston, Massachusetts, the son of George Frederick Root, a Civil War songwriter and teacher, and Mary Olive Woodman, a gifted singer. Frederick grew up in musical surroundings and became absorbed in his father’s educational and business pursuits. He studied piano with ...

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Surette, Thomas Whitney (07 September 1861–19 May 1941), musician and teacher, was born and died in Concord, Massachusetts, the son of Louis Athanase Surette, a commission merchant, and Frances Jane Shattuck. He spent most of his life in Concord and attended the public schools. Little is known of his formal music training except for some classes in composition at Harvard University with ...