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Howe, Percy Rogers (30 September 1864–28 February 1950), dental educator and scientist, was born in North Providence, Rhode Island, the son of James Albert Howe and Elizabeth Rachel Rogers. His father was a Baptist minister who became dean of the Cobb Divinity School at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine, where Percy spent his childhood and attended the Nichols Latin School and Bates College, from which he graduated with a B.A. in 1887. Not wishing to enter the ministry, he accepted an offer to apprentice with a family dentist; afterward, having decided on a dental career, he entered the Philadelphia Dental College, earning a D.D.S. in 1890. Having established a successful practice in Lewiston, he moved in 1903 to Boston, where once again his practice flourished. He had married Rose Alma Hilton in 1891; they had two sons....

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Keep, Nathan Cooley (23 December 1800–11 March 1875), dental scientist and educator, was born in Longmeadow, Massachusetts, the son of Samuel Keep and Anne Bliss, farmers. His early education at the local village school was relatively meager. His family was intensely religious, and several family members were active in the Congregational church. He shared his father’s interest in and skill with the use of tools and appeared destined for a career as an artisan. When Keep was sixteen his father apprenticed him to John Taylor, a jeweler in Newark, New Jersey, even though young Nathan’s first choice was to become a schoolteacher. As a dutiful son, he followed his father’s wishes and stayed with his indentureship. However, a general business slump in 1821 forced Taylor to lay him off after only five years....

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McQuillen, John Hugh (12 February 1826–03 March 1879), dentist, editor, and educator, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the son of Hugh McQuillen and Martha Scattergood, occupations unknown. He attended the Friends’ School and worked as a youth as a clerk in an importing firm. In 1847 he began the study of medicine and became particularly interested in dentistry. He studied with Elisha Townsend, a noted Philadelphia dentist, and in 1849 went into dental practice. He continued his medical studies and in 1852 received the M.D. from Jefferson Medical College. That same year he married Amelia Donnel Schellenger. They had five children, one of whom died in infancy. From 1852 to 1861 he was associated with Daniel Neall, another well-known Philadelphia dentist, and then returned to private practice....